103

Is it possible to use JSON.NET as default JSON serializer in ASP.NET MVC 3?

According to my research, it seems that the only way to accomplish this is to extend ActionResult as JsonResult in MVC3 is not virtual...

I hoped that with ASP.NET MVC 3 that there would be a way to specify a pluggable provider for serializing to JSON.

Thoughts?

1

7 Answers 7

106

I believe the best way to do it, is - as described in your links - to extend ActionResult or extend JsonResult directly.

As for the method JsonResult that is not virtual on the controller that's not true, just choose the right overload. This works well:

protected override JsonResult Json(object data, string contentType, Encoding contentEncoding)

EDIT 1: A JsonResult extension...

public class JsonNetResult : JsonResult
{
    public override void ExecuteResult(ControllerContext context)
    {
        if (context == null)
            throw new ArgumentNullException("context");

        var response = context.HttpContext.Response;

        response.ContentType = !String.IsNullOrEmpty(ContentType) 
            ? ContentType 
            : "application/json";

        if (ContentEncoding != null)
            response.ContentEncoding = ContentEncoding;

        // If you need special handling, you can call another form of SerializeObject below
        var serializedObject = JsonConvert.SerializeObject(Data, Formatting.Indented);
        response.Write(serializedObject);
    }

EDIT 2: I removed the check for Data being null as per the suggestions below. That should make newer versions of JQuery happy and seems like the sane thing to do, as the response can then be unconditionally deserialized. Be aware though, that this is not the default behavior for JSON responses from ASP.NET MVC, which rather responds with an empty string, when there's no data.

10
  • 1
    The code refers to MySpecialContractResolver, which isn't defined. This question helps with that (and was very related to the problem I had to solve): stackoverflow.com/questions/6700053/…
    – Elliveny
    Feb 19, 2012 at 13:53
  • 1
    Thanks for the great answer. Why the if (Data == null) return; ? For my use case I wanted to get back whatever the JSON standard was, which Json.Net faithfully does, even for null (returning "null"). By intercepting null values you end up sending the empty string back for these, which deviates from the standard and causes downstream problems - for example with jQuery 1.9.1: stackoverflow.com/a/15939945/176877 Apr 11, 2013 at 4:41
  • 1
    @Chris Moschini: You're absolutely right. It is wrong to return an empty string. But should it return the json value null or an empty json object then? I'm not sure returning a value where an object is expected is problem free either. But either way, the current code is not good in this respect. Apr 11, 2013 at 15:56
  • 1
    There's a bug in Json.Net that causes IE9 and below to fail to parse the ISO 8601 Dates Json.Net produces. Fix for this is included in this answer: stackoverflow.com/a/15939945/176877 Jun 20, 2013 at 7:36
  • 1
    @asgerhallas, @Chris Moschini What about default asp.net mvc JsonResult check if (this.JsonRequestBehavior == JsonRequestBehavior.DenyGet && string.Equals(context.HttpContext.Request.HttpMethod, "GET", StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase)) throw new InvalidOperationException(MvcResources.JsonRequest_GetNotAllowed);? I think need to add this check in answer(without internal MvcResources.JsonRequest_GetNotAllowed but with some custom message) Also, what about 2 other default asp.net mvc checks - MaxJsonLength and RecursionLimit? Do we need them if we use json.net?
    – chromigo
    May 14, 2016 at 15:53
67

I implemented this without the need of a base controller or injection.

I used action filters to replace the JsonResult with a JsonNetResult.

public class JsonHandlerAttribute : ActionFilterAttribute
{
    public override void OnActionExecuted(ActionExecutedContext filterContext)
    {
       var jsonResult = filterContext.Result as JsonResult;

        if (jsonResult != null)
        {
            filterContext.Result = new JsonNetResult
            {
                ContentEncoding = jsonResult.ContentEncoding,
                ContentType = jsonResult.ContentType,
                Data = jsonResult.Data,
                JsonRequestBehavior = jsonResult.JsonRequestBehavior
            };
        }

        base.OnActionExecuted(filterContext);
    }
}

In the Global.asax.cs Application_Start() you would need to add:

GlobalFilters.Filters.Add(new JsonHandlerAttribute());

For completion's sake, here is my JsonNetResult extention class that I picked up from somewhere else and that I modified slightly to get correct steaming support:

public class JsonNetResult : JsonResult
{
    public JsonNetResult()
    {
        Settings = new JsonSerializerSettings
        {
            ReferenceLoopHandling = ReferenceLoopHandling.Error
        };
    }

    public JsonSerializerSettings Settings { get; private set; }

    public override void ExecuteResult(ControllerContext context)
    {
        if (context == null)
            throw new ArgumentNullException("context");
        if (this.JsonRequestBehavior == JsonRequestBehavior.DenyGet && string.Equals(context.HttpContext.Request.HttpMethod, "GET", StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase))
            throw new InvalidOperationException("JSON GET is not allowed");

        HttpResponseBase response = context.HttpContext.Response;
        response.ContentType = string.IsNullOrEmpty(this.ContentType) ? "application/json" : this.ContentType;

        if (this.ContentEncoding != null)
            response.ContentEncoding = this.ContentEncoding;
        if (this.Data == null)
            return;

        var scriptSerializer = JsonSerializer.Create(this.Settings);
        scriptSerializer.Serialize(response.Output, this.Data);
    }
}
6
  • 1
    This is a nice solution. Makes it so the native return Json() in effect uses Json.Net. Nov 6, 2015 at 2:05
  • 1
    For anyone wondering just how this works, it intercepts the JsonResult from Json() and converts it to a JsonNetResult. It does so using the as keyword which returns null if the conversion isn't possible. Very nifty. 10 points for Gryffindor! Nov 6, 2015 at 2:08
  • 4
    Question though, does the default serializer run on the object before it's intercepted? Nov 6, 2015 at 2:09
  • This is a fantastic answer - with the most flexibility. Since my project was already doing all kinds of manual solutions on the front end, I could not add a global filter - this would require a bigger change. I ended up just solving the problem only on the controller actions where necessary by using the attribute on my controller's actions. However, I called it - [BetterJsonHandler] :-). Jul 27, 2017 at 20:40
  • returning this.Json(null); still returns nothing
    – Brunis
    Dec 15, 2017 at 14:06
29

Use Newtonsoft's JSON converter:

public ActionResult DoSomething()
{
    dynamic cResponse = new ExpandoObject();
    cResponse.Property1 = "value1";
    cResponse.Property2 = "value2";
    return Content(JsonConvert.SerializeObject(cResponse), "application/json");
}
2
  • 8
    Not sure if this is hacky or not, but holy crap is it easier than creating extension classes, just to return a stupid json string. Sep 28, 2014 at 1:04
  • I don't think this is a hack, but if you create your own CustomJsonSerializer then you don't need repeat this line Content(JsonConvert.SerializeObject(cResponse), "application/json"); in every Action method that returns json. You would put the serialization logic in the CustomJsonSerializer. Also note that CustomJsonSerializer does some extra error handling which you probably don't want to repeat in your Action method. Aug 23, 2023 at 22:27
21

I know this is well after the question has been answered, but I'm using a different approach as I am using dependency injection to instantiate my controllers.

I have replaced the IActionInvoker ( by injecting the controller's ControllerActionInvoker Property ) with a version that overrides the InvokeActionMethod method.

This means no change to controller inheritance and it can be easily removed when I upgrade to MVC4 by altering the DI container's registration for ALL controllers

public class JsonNetActionInvoker : ControllerActionInvoker
{
    protected override ActionResult InvokeActionMethod(ControllerContext controllerContext, ActionDescriptor actionDescriptor, IDictionary<string, object> parameters)
    {
        ActionResult invokeActionMethod = base.InvokeActionMethod(controllerContext, actionDescriptor, parameters);

        if ( invokeActionMethod.GetType() == typeof(JsonResult) )
        {
            return new JsonNetResult(invokeActionMethod as JsonResult);
        }

        return invokeActionMethod;
    }

    private class JsonNetResult : JsonResult
    {
        public JsonNetResult()
        {
            this.ContentType = "application/json";
        }

        public JsonNetResult( JsonResult existing )
        {
            this.ContentEncoding = existing.ContentEncoding;
            this.ContentType = !string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(existing.ContentType) ? existing.ContentType : "application/json";
            this.Data = existing.Data;
            this.JsonRequestBehavior = existing.JsonRequestBehavior;
        }

        public override void ExecuteResult(ControllerContext context)
        {
            if (context == null)
            {
                throw new ArgumentNullException("context");
            }
            if ((this.JsonRequestBehavior == JsonRequestBehavior.DenyGet) && string.Equals(context.HttpContext.Request.HttpMethod, "GET", StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase))
            {
                base.ExecuteResult(context);                            // Delegate back to allow the default exception to be thrown
            }

            HttpResponseBase response = context.HttpContext.Response;
            response.ContentType = this.ContentType;

            if (this.ContentEncoding != null)
            {
                response.ContentEncoding = this.ContentEncoding;
            }

            if (this.Data != null)
            {
                // Replace with your favourite serializer.  
                new Newtonsoft.Json.JsonSerializer().Serialize( response.Output, this.Data );
            }
        }
    }
}

--- EDIT - Updated to show container registration for controllers. I'm using Unity here.

private void RegisterAllControllers(List<Type> exportedTypes)
{
    this.rootContainer.RegisterType<IActionInvoker, JsonNetActionInvoker>();
    Func<Type, bool> isIController = typeof(IController).IsAssignableFrom;
    Func<Type, bool> isIHttpController = typeof(IHttpController).IsAssignableFrom;

    foreach (Type controllerType in exportedTypes.Where(isIController))
    {
        this.rootContainer.RegisterType(
            typeof(IController),
            controllerType, 
            controllerType.Name.Replace("Controller", string.Empty),
            new InjectionProperty("ActionInvoker")
        );
    }

    foreach (Type controllerType in exportedTypes.Where(isIHttpController))
    {
        this.rootContainer.RegisterType(typeof(IHttpController), controllerType, controllerType.Name);
    }
}

public class UnityControllerFactory : System.Web.Mvc.IControllerFactory, System.Web.Http.Dispatcher.IHttpControllerActivator
{
    readonly IUnityContainer container;

    public UnityControllerFactory(IUnityContainer container)
    {
        this.container = container;
    }

    IController System.Web.Mvc.IControllerFactory.CreateController(System.Web.Routing.RequestContext requestContext, string controllerName)
    {
        return this.container.Resolve<IController>(controllerName);
    }

    SessionStateBehavior System.Web.Mvc.IControllerFactory.GetControllerSessionBehavior(RequestContext requestContext, string controllerName)
    {
        return SessionStateBehavior.Required;
    }

    void System.Web.Mvc.IControllerFactory.ReleaseController(IController controller)
    {
    }

    IHttpController IHttpControllerActivator.Create(HttpRequestMessage request, HttpControllerDescriptor controllerDescriptor, Type controllerType)
    {
        return this.container.Resolve<IHttpController>(controllerType.Name);
    }
}
7
  • Nice, but how do you use it? Or better how did you inject it?
    – DATEx2
    Oct 30, 2012 at 23:57
  • +1 for using the Stream form of .Serialize(). I was going to point out you can just use JsonConvert like the other top answer, but your approach gradually streams out long/large objects - that's a free performance boost, especially if the downstream client can handle partial responses. Apr 11, 2013 at 4:49
  • 1
    nice implementation. This should be the answer! Sep 2, 2013 at 19:28
  • Good going, this was the only thing i was using a base controller for. Oct 26, 2013 at 10:10
  • really nice - this is much better then overriding the Json() function, since in every location where you will return a JsonResult this will kick in and do it's magic. For those who don't use DI, just add protected override IActionInvoker CreateActionInvoker() { return new JsonNetActionInvoker();} to your base controller
    – Avi Pinto
    Dec 7, 2014 at 14:19
13

Expanding on the answer from https://stackoverflow.com/users/183056/sami-beyoglu, if you set the Content type, then jQuery will be able to convert the returned data into an object for you.

public ActionResult DoSomething()
{
    dynamic cResponse = new ExpandoObject();
    cResponse.Property1 = "value1";
    cResponse.Property2 = "value2";
    return Content(JsonConvert.SerializeObject(cResponse), "application/json");
}
2
  • Thank you, I have a hybrid mix and this is the only thing that would work for me. Jul 1, 2015 at 22:27
  • I used this with JSON.NET like this: JObject jo = GetJSON(); return Content(jo.ToString(), "application/json");
    – John Mott
    Sep 27, 2015 at 16:58
7

My Post may help someone.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Web;
using System.Web.Mvc;
namespace MultipleSubmit.Service
{
    public abstract class BaseController : Controller
    {
        protected override JsonResult Json(object data, string contentType,
            Encoding contentEncoding, JsonRequestBehavior behavior)
        {
            return new JsonNetResult
            {
                Data = data,
                ContentType = contentType,
                ContentEncoding = contentEncoding,
                JsonRequestBehavior = behavior
            };
        }
    }
}


using Newtonsoft.Json;
using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.IO;
using System.Linq;
using System.Web;
using System.Web.Mvc;
namespace MultipleSubmit.Service
{
    public class JsonNetResult : JsonResult
    {
        public JsonNetResult()
        {
            Settings = new JsonSerializerSettings
            {
                ReferenceLoopHandling = ReferenceLoopHandling.Error
            };
        }
        public JsonSerializerSettings Settings { get; private set; }
        public override void ExecuteResult(ControllerContext context)
        {
            if (context == null)
                throw new ArgumentNullException("context");
            if (this.JsonRequestBehavior == JsonRequestBehavior.DenyGet && string.Equals
(context.HttpContext.Request.HttpMethod, "GET", StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase))
                throw new InvalidOperationException("JSON GET is not allowed");
            HttpResponseBase response = context.HttpContext.Response;
            response.ContentType = string.IsNullOrEmpty(this.ContentType) ? 
"application/json" : this.ContentType;
            if (this.ContentEncoding != null)
                response.ContentEncoding = this.ContentEncoding;
            if (this.Data == null)
                return;
            var scriptSerializer = JsonSerializer.Create(this.Settings);
            using (var sw = new StringWriter())
            {
                scriptSerializer.Serialize(sw, this.Data);
                response.Write(sw.ToString());
            }
        }
    }
} 

public class MultipleSubmitController : BaseController
{
   public JsonResult Index()
    {
      var data = obj1;  // obj1 contains the Json data
      return Json(data, JsonRequestBehavior.AllowGet);
    }
}    
1
  • Thanks. Having already implemented my own BaseController, this was the lowest impact chang - just had to add the class and update BaseController.
    – AndrewP
    Jan 8, 2019 at 2:01
5

I made a version that makes web service actions type-safe and simple. You use it like this:

public JsonResult<MyDataContract> MyAction()
{
    return new MyDataContract();
}

The class:

public class JsonResult<T> : JsonResult
{
    public JsonResult(T data)
    {
        Data = data;
        JsonRequestBehavior = JsonRequestBehavior.AllowGet;
    }

    public override void ExecuteResult(ControllerContext context)
    {
        // Use Json.Net rather than the default JavaScriptSerializer because it's faster and better

        if (context == null)
            throw new ArgumentNullException("context");

        var response = context.HttpContext.Response;

        response.ContentType = !String.IsNullOrEmpty(ContentType)
            ? ContentType
            : "application/json";

        if (ContentEncoding != null)
            response.ContentEncoding = ContentEncoding;

        var serializedObject = JsonConvert.SerializeObject(Data, Formatting.Indented);
        response.Write(serializedObject);
    }

    public static implicit operator JsonResult<T>(T d)
    {
        return new JsonResult<T>(d);
    }
}
4
  • but why would you want to have a strongly types JsonResult? :D you loose the anonymous types results and earn nothing on the client side, as its not using C# classses anyway?
    – mikus
    Oct 20, 2015 at 13:23
  • 2
    @mikus It is typesafe on the server side: the method must return type MyDataContract. It makes it clear to the client side exactly what data structure is being returned. It is also concise and readable - JsonResult<T> autoconverts any type being returned to Json and you don't have to do anything. Nov 10, 2015 at 18:08
  • Exactly. I find it silly that everything I return is a JsonResult or string (for Newtonsoft) even for actions that return generic collections. That's an extra added step for any unit testing because you have to deserialize everything again. It seems that in Core at least you can return an IEnumerable<T> now and it will serialize, but I don't think it works .NET Framework. (I'd love to be wrong about that, but I can't get it to work.) Dec 21, 2021 at 16:00
  • To add to the answer, I ended up adding an extension method: public static JsonResult<T> Preserialize<T>(this T data) where T: class => new JsonResult<T>(data). That way you don't have to write long types out every time. So example usage would be Enumerable.Range(0, 100).Preserialize() I tried defining an implicit conversion, but they don't work on interface types. Dec 21, 2021 at 17:46

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