2

When I say "Entity" below, I'm not specifically referring to anything relating to the ECS pattern, I just mean a general game entity.

I'm trying my hand at game development in C, after having done previous game dev in TypeScript. I'm looking for a C idiomatic way to reuse a pattern with which I'm familiar: each tick, the game iterates through a list of entities, telling each one to update itself, then draw itself. Each entity knows how to update itself, but requires information about the game as a whole to make this update.

// Game.ts
import Entity from './Entity.js'
class Game {
  entities: List<Entity>;

  tick(dt: number) {
    entities.forEach(e => e.tick(dt));
    entities.forEach(e => e.draw());
  }
}

// Entity.ts
import Game from './Game.ts'
class Entity {
  game: Game;

  constructor(g: Game) {
    this.game = g;
  }

  tick(dt: number) {
    this.move(dt);
    this.collide(this.game);
  }
  draw() { /* snip */}
}

In C, I would like to have a big Game struct that has a list of all Entities inside it, and each Entity contains a function pointer for how to update itself.

// game.h
#include "entity.h"
typedef struct Game {
  Entity *entities;
} Game;

// entity.h
#include "game.h"
typedef struct Entity Entity;

typedef void (*tick) (Entity*);

struct Entity {
  Game *game;
  char* name;
  int x, y;
  tick* t;
};

This, however, requires a circular reference to Game in Entity and Entity in Game, which I've gathered that one is not supposed to do. The only way I've thought of to make this work is to put a tick_entity(Game *game, Entity *e) function in game.h, but my OO brain wants to separate my concerns some more to avoid making Game responsible for everything, especially once I have different kinds of Entities. Is there a more idiomatic way to do what I'm trying to do here?

2
  • Shouldn't it be typedef void tick(Entity*);?
    – tstanisl
    Feb 13 at 13:40
  • ... or shouldn't Entity { tick* t; } just be Entity { tick t; }? Do you really want t to be a pointer to a function-pointer instead of a function-pointer? Currently, this is how it would look: void foo(Entity* e) {} Entity e; tick ptr = foo; e.t = &ptr;
    – Ted Lyngmo
    Feb 13 at 13:53

1 Answer 1

2

Don't #include "entity.h" from game.h and vice versa. Just forward declare what you need a pointer to. Also add header guards if you haven't already.

Example:

// game.h
#ifndef GAME_H                 // header guard
#define GAME_H

//#include "entity.h"          // remove this
typedef struct Entity Entity;  // forward declare

typedef struct Game {
    Entity* entities;
} Game;

#endif
// entity.h
#ifndef ENTITY_H               // header guard
#define ENTITY_H

//#include "game.h"            // remove this
typedef struct Game Game;      // forward declare
typedef struct Entity Entity;

typedef void (*tick)(Entity*);

struct Entity {
    Game* game;
    char* name;
    int x, y;
    tick* t;
};

#endif
4
  • Shouldn't it be typedef void tick(Entity*);?
    – tstanisl
    Feb 13 at 13:32
  • @tstanisl Ah, yes ... It's wrong in the Entity struct unless t is supposed to be a pointer-to-pointer
    – Ted Lyngmo
    Feb 13 at 13:36
  • All signs point to me not fully understanding what typedef actually does, or what "forward declare" actually means. Now I know what to research next. Thanks! Feb 13 at 17:03
  • @BassguitarBill You're welcome! In short, a forward declaration, like struct Foo; tells the compiler that "there will be a definition of "struct Foo" later, which is enough to be able to create pointers to struct Foos. This works because you don't need to know the size/layout of a struct Foo in order to calculae the size of a pointer. typedef struct Foo Foo; is to define a type Foo out of struct Foo so that you don't have to type struct Foo all the time but can use Foo instead.
    – Ted Lyngmo
    Feb 13 at 17:41

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