9

I have what I think is an interesting problem.

Basically, I have a list of Items, where each Item has a fixed set of meta-data, of different values.

For example:

  • Item 1: {Type = "Text", Author = "User A", Edited Date = "03/03/2003"}
  • Item 2: {Type = "Table", Author = "User A", Edited Date = "04/05/2006"}
  • Item 3: {Type = "Image", Author = "User B", Edited Date = "05/05/2005"}
  • Item 4: {Type = "Text", Author = "User B", Edited Date = "05/07/2007"}

Now, as it stands, that list of items is flattened and presented in a table.

However, we would like to find a way to allow the users to browse it in a tree, but with the added flexibility that they can 'pivot' the order each of the meta-data tags appears in the tree.

So, initially it might look like:

Items
+ Table
  + User A
    + 04/05/2006
      -> Item 2
    -> Item 2
  -> Item 2
+ Text
  + User A
    + 03/03/2003
      -> Item 1
    -> Item 1
  + User B
    + 05/07/2007
      -> Item 4
    -> Item 4
  -> Item 1
  -> Item 4
+ Image
  ..

However, suppose instead, a user wants to flip it round and view all items related to a particular user:

Items
+ User A
  + Text
  + Table
  -> Item 1
  -> Item 2
+ User B
  + Image
  + Text
  -> Item 3
  -> Item 4

And so on.

I hope that makes sense.

So, what I'm wondering therefore, is if there is a best practice approach to achieving this at low cost? The result of each 'flip/shuffle/pivot' is nicely represented in a tree, so obviously the first thought is that when a user requests to change the representation, a new tree could be generated of the list of items as required. However, I was hoping perhaps there may be a better way, simply rotating a single tree etc.

Also, is this something that could be done computationally cheaply in JavaScript on the user's browser, if the backend were to just simply return a flat list of items?

Many thanks & kind regards,

Jamie

  • 1
    Is this in Java or Javascript? They're two very different languages. – Reverend Gonzo Aug 18 '11 at 15:48
  • @Reverend Gonzo - Preferably in JavaScript to allow the client browser to alter the presentation of the data without having to make repeat requests to a servlet. However, if it would be too intensive to do in JS, it could be handled in Java each time. – Jay Aug 18 '11 at 15:57
  • i know someone who has implemented this as a way to view large data sets on mobile devices (if i understand correctly). i think it's some kind of javascript lib. he's given a presentation on it twice at our local dynamic languages group. if you're interested email me at andrew@acooke.org and i can probably connect you up. – andrew cooke Aug 18 '11 at 15:59
  • I don't think the two trees are presented consistently. For example, in the second tree, there is no entry under + User A, + Text. – Little Endian Apr 26 '14 at 22:17
1

You want to present elements in a tree structure, but with a variable tree depth and changing tree branching: I doubt a tree structure is actualy what you want.

I think you should consider instead that the world is flat (like in your table). A javascript database could help (there is http://taffydb.com/)

Still considering the world is flat, you could also create a signature function that returns a string

separator="µ"; //TODO Find something better
function signature() {
  return item.Type + separator + item.Author + separator + item.EditedDate;
}


assert(item1.signature == "TextµUser Aµ03/03/2003")

Then you store your objects in a simple dictionary using this signature as the key.

And then, you can perform a regexp match on the keys to get the objects you want. First, edit the signature function to return "([^separator]+)" if the corresponding item property is undefined.

assert ({Type="Text"}.signature() == "Textµ[^µ]+µ[^µ]+")

function find(filterItem) {
  retval= = new generic.list();
  for (var k in dict.keys()) {
    if (k.match(regexp)) {
      retval.add(dcit[k]);
    }
  }
}

I have no idea whether this is faster than browsing all elements though.

  • Thanks for pointing me towards the taffydb, I'd not heard of javascript side databases. I'm going to think through whether taking advantage of increasingly specific 'queries' on the taffydb would work. Thankfully, the json array of objects returned are simple associative arrays, with consistent keys. I wonder how performance of taffydb would compare to a recursive partitioning approach of the array into sub-arrays dynamically as the user decides which type of meta-data to branch on next. – Jay Aug 19 '11 at 16:18
0

They way I would go around to solve this is to define a list item that lookgs something like this:

public class Item
{
    string NodeName {get; set;}
    string Url {get; set;}
    List<Item> Children {get; set;}
}

This is c#-code, but the idea should be applicable in any language that supports objects. Now your list only need to support one type of list, and that is a list of Item so all you need to do is find a way to transform your data to such a list.

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