258

The problem I'm having is that the dragleave event of an element is fired when hovering a child element of that element. Also, dragenter is not fired when hovering back the parent element again.

I made a simplified fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/pimvdb/HU6Mk/1/.

HTML:

<div id="drag" draggable="true">drag me</div>

<hr>

<div id="drop">
    drop here
    <p>child</p>
    parent
</div>

with the following JavaScript:

$('#drop').bind({
                 dragenter: function() {
                     $(this).addClass('red');
                 },

                 dragleave: function() {
                     $(this).removeClass('red');
                 }
                });

$('#drag').bind({
                 dragstart: function(e) {
                     e.allowedEffect = "copy";
                     e.setData("text/plain", "test");
                 }
                });

What it is supposed to do is notifying the user by making the drop div red when dragging something there. This works, but if you drag into the p child, the dragleave is fired and the div isn't red anymore. Moving back to the drop div also doesn't make it red again. It's necessary to move completely out of the drop div and drag back into it again to make it red.

Is it possible to prevent dragleave from firing when dragging into a child element?

2017 Update: TL;DR, Look up CSS pointer-events: none; as described in @H.D.'s answer below that works in modern browsers and IE11.

  • The bug pimvdb reported still exists in Webkit as of May 2012. I've countered it by also adding a class in dragover, which isn't anywhere close to nice since it fires so often, but appears to patch the issue a bit. – ajm May 11 '12 at 18:35
  • 1
    @ajm: Thanks, that works to an extent. However, on Chrome, there is a flash when entering or leaving the child element, presumably because dragleave is still fired in that case. – pimvdb May 11 '12 at 19:08
  • I have opened a jQuery UI bug upvotes are welcome so they can decide to put resources on it – fguillen Aug 21 '12 at 18:07
  • @fguillen: I'm sorry but this has nothing to do with jQuery UI. In fact, jQuery isn't even needed to trigger the bug. I've filed a WebKit bug already but there is no update as of now. – pimvdb Aug 21 '12 at 18:09
  • 1
    @pimvdb Why don't you accept H.D.'s answer? – TylerH Sep 20 '17 at 15:21

31 Answers 31

293

You just need to keep a reference counter, increment it when you get a dragenter, decrement when you get a dragleave. When the counter is at 0 - remove the class.

var counter = 0;

$('#drop').bind({
    dragenter: function(ev) {
        ev.preventDefault(); // needed for IE
        counter++;
        $(this).addClass('red');
    },

    dragleave: function() {
        counter--;
        if (counter === 0) { 
            $(this).removeClass('red');
        }
    }
});

Note: In the drop event, reset counter to zero, and clear the added class.

You can run it here

  • 7
    OMG this is the most obvious solution and only had ONE vote... Come on people, you can do better. I was thinking about that but after seeing the level of sophistication of the first few answers I almost discarded it. Did you have any drawbacks ? – Arthur Corenzan Jul 15 '14 at 0:16
  • 9
    This didn't work when the edge of the element being dragged touches the edge of another draggable element. For instance a sortable list; dragging the element downwards, over the next draggable item does not decrement the counter back to 0, instead it gets stucked at 1. But if I drag it sideways, out of any other draggable element, it works. I went with the pointer-events: none on the children. When I start dragging I append a class that has this property, when drag's over I remove the class. Worked nicely on Safari and Chrome, but not on Firefox. – Arthur Corenzan Mar 14 '15 at 14:37
  • 10
    This worked for me in all browsers, but Firefox. I have a new solution which works everywhere in my case. On the first dragenter I save event.currentTarget in a new variable dragEnterTarget. As long as dragEnterTarget is set, I ignore further dragenter events, because they are from children. In all dragleave events I check dragEnterTarget === event.target. If this is false the event will be ignored as it was fired by a child. If this is true I reset dragEnterTarget to undefined. – Pipo Jan 6 '16 at 12:54
  • 3
    Great solution. I needed to reset the counter to 0 in the function that handles accepting the drop though, otherwise subsequent drags didn't work as expected. – Liam Johnston Jan 7 '16 at 1:45
  • 2
    @Woody I didn't see his comment in the huge list of comments here, but yes, that's the fix. Why not incorporate that into your answer? – B T Jul 18 '16 at 21:28
66

Is it possible to prevent dragleave from firing when dragging into a child element?

Yes.

#drop * {pointer-events: none;}

That CSS seem to be enough for Chrome.

While using it with Firefox, the #drop shouldn't have text nodes directly (else there's a strange issue where a element "leave it to itself"), so I suggest to leave it with only one element (e.g., use a div inside #drop to put everything inside)

Here's a jsfiddle solving the original question (broken) example.

I've also made a simplified version forked from the @Theodore Brown example, but based only in this CSS.

Not all browsers have this CSS implemented, though: http://caniuse.com/pointer-events

Seeing the Facebook source code I could find this pointer-events: none; several times, however it's probably used together with graceful degradation fallbacks. At least it's so simple and solves the problem for a lot of environments.

  • The pointer-events property is the right solution going forward, but unfortunately it doesn't work in IE8-IE10, which are still widely used. Also, I should point out that your current jsFiddle doesn't even work in IE11, since it doesn't add the necessary event listeners and default behavior prevention. – Theodore Brown Sep 18 '13 at 21:39
  • 2
    Using pointer-events is indeed a good answer, I struggled a bit before finding out by myself, that answer should be higher. – floribon Aug 14 '14 at 0:50
  • Fantastic option for those of us lucky enough to not have to support old browsers. – Luke Hansford Oct 5 '15 at 7:48
  • 3
    What if your children is a Button? o.O – David Mar 15 '16 at 11:47
  • 5
    it works only if you do not have other controller elements (edit, delete) inside the area, because this solution blocks them too.. – Zoltán Süle Oct 9 '18 at 15:12
42

Here, the simplest Cross-Browser solution (seriously):

jsfiddle <-- try dragging some file inside the box

You can do something like that:

var dropZone= document.getElementById('box');
var dropMask = document.getElementById('drop-mask');

dropZone.addEventListener('dragover', drag_over, false);
dropMask.addEventListener('dragleave', drag_leave, false);
dropMask.addEventListener('drop', drag_drop, false);

In a few words, you create a "mask" inside the dropzone, with width & height inherited, position absolute, that will just show when the dragover starts.
So, after showing that mask, you can do the trick by attaching the others dragleave & drop events on it.

After leaving or dropping, you just hide the mask again.
Simple and without complications.

(Obs.: Greg Pettit advice -- You must be sure that the mask hover the entire box, including the border)

  • Not sure why, but it's not working consistently with Chrome. Sometimes leaving the area keeps the mask visible. – Greg Pettit May 23 '13 at 18:53
  • 2
    Actually, it's the border. Have the mask overlapping the border, with no border of its own, and it should work OK. – Greg Pettit May 23 '13 at 18:59
  • 1
    Note, your jsfiddle has a bug in it, in drag_drop, you should remove the hover class on "#box" not "#box-a" – entropy Dec 16 '13 at 10:30
  • This is a nice solution, but somehow it did not work for me. I finally figure out a workaround. For those of you who are looking for something else. you could try this: github.com/bingjie2680/jquery-draghover – bingjie2680 Jun 19 '14 at 12:04
  • No. I do not want to lose the control over the child elements. I've made a simple jQuery plugin that deals with the problem doing the job for us. Check my answer. – Luca Fagioli Apr 25 '15 at 18:58
34

The "right" way to solve this issue is to disable pointer events on child elements of the drop target (as in @H.D.'s answer). Here's a jsFiddle I created which demonstrates this technique. Unfortunately, this doesn't work in versions of Internet Explorer prior to IE11, since they didn't support pointer events.

Luckily, I was able to come up with a workaround which does work in old versions of IE. Basically, it involves identifying and ignoring dragleave events which occur when dragging over child elements. Because the dragenter event is fired on child nodes before the dragleave event on the parent, separate event listeners can be added to each child node which add or remove an "ignore-drag-leave" class from the drop target. Then the drop target's dragleave event listener can simply ignore calls which occur when this class exists. Here's a jsFiddle demonstrating this workaround. It is tested and working in Chrome, Firefox, and IE8+.

Update:

I created a jsFiddle demonstrating a combined solution using feature detection, where pointer events are used if supported (currently Chrome, Firefox, and IE11), and the browser falls back to adding events to child nodes if pointer event support isn't available (IE8-10).

  • This answer shows a workaround for the undesirable firing but neglects the question "Is it possible to prevent dragleave from firing when dragging into a child element?" entirely. – H.D. Sep 3 '13 at 0:34
  • Behaviour can get strange when dragging a file from outside the browser. In Firefox I've got "Entering child -> Entering Parent -> Leaving child -> Entering child -> Leaving child" without leaving the parent, which left with the "over" class. Old IE would need an attachEvent replacement for the addEventListener. – H.D. Sep 3 '13 at 0:34
  • That solution depends strongly on the bubbling, the "false" in all addEventListener should be emphasized as essential (although that's the default behaviour), since many people may not know about that. – H.D. Sep 3 '13 at 0:35
  • That single draggable adds an effect to the dropzone that doesn't appear when the dropzone is used for other draggable objects that doesn't trigger the dragstart event. Perhaps using everything as a dropzone for the effect of dragging while keeping the real dropzone with other handlers would do that. – H.D. Sep 3 '13 at 0:35
  • 1
    @H.D. I updated my answer with info on using the pointer-events CSS property to prevent the dragleave event from firing in Chrome, Firefox, and IE11+. I also updated my other workaround to support IE8 and IE9, in addition to IE10. It is intentional that the dropzone effect is only added when dragging the "Drag me" link. Others can feel free to change this behavior as needed to support their use cases. – Theodore Brown Sep 18 '13 at 21:32
26

It has been quite some time after this question is asked and a lot of solutions (including ugly hacks) are provided.

I managed to fix the same problem I had recently thanks to the answer in this answer and thought it may be helpful to someone who comes through to this page. The whole idea is to store the evenet.target in ondrageenter everytime it is called on any of the parent or child elements. Then in ondragleave check if the current target (event.target) is equal to the object you stored in ondragenter.

The only case these two are matched is when your drag is leaving the browser window.

The reason that this works fine is when the mouse leaves an element (say el1) and enters another element (say el2), first the el1.ondragenter is called and then el2.ondragleave. Only when the drag is leaving/entering the browser window, event.target will be '' in both el1.ondragenter and el2.ondragleave.

Here is my working sample. I have tested it on IE9+, Chrome, Firefox and Safari.

(function() {
    var bodyEl = document.body;
    var flupDiv = document.getElementById('file-drop-area');

    flupDiv.onclick = function(event){
        console.log('HEy! some one clicked me!');
    };

    var enterTarget = null;

    document.ondragenter = function(event) {
        console.log('on drag enter: ' + event.target.id);
        enterTarget = event.target;
        event.stopPropagation();
        event.preventDefault();
        flupDiv.className = 'flup-drag-on-top';
        return false;
    };

    document.ondragleave = function(event) {
        console.log('on drag leave: currentTarget: ' + event.target.id + ', old target: ' + enterTarget.id);
        //Only if the two target are equal it means the drag has left the window
        if (enterTarget == event.target){
            event.stopPropagation();
            event.preventDefault();
            flupDiv.className = 'flup-no-drag';         
        }
    };
    document.ondrop = function(event) {
        console.log('on drop: ' + event.target.id);
        event.stopPropagation();
        event.preventDefault();
        flupDiv.className = 'flup-no-drag';
        return false;
    };
})();

And here is a simple html page:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
<meta charset="UTF-8">
<title>Multiple File Uploader</title>
<link rel="stylesheet" href="my.css" />
</head>
<body id="bodyDiv">
    <div id="cntnr" class="flup-container">
        <div id="file-drop-area" class="flup-no-drag">blah blah</div>
    </div>
    <script src="my.js"></script>
</body>
</html>

With proper styling what I have done is to make the inner div (#file-drop-area) much bigger whenever a file is dragged into the screen so that the user can easily drop the files into the proper place.

  • 3
    This is the best solution, it's better than the counter (especially if you delegate events) and it works with draggable children as well. – Fred Oct 11 '15 at 21:03
  • 1
    Very elegant, thank you I used this concept. – magikMaker Apr 11 '16 at 11:32
  • 2
    This doesn't help tho for the problem of duplicate dragenter events – B T Jul 18 '16 at 8:24
  • Does this work for "children" that are css pseudo-elements or pseudo-classes? I couldn't get it to, but maybe I was doing it wrong. – Josh Bleecher Snyder Jan 30 '18 at 20:26
14

The problem is that the dragleave event is being fired when the mouse goes in front of the child element.

I've tried various methods of checking to see if the e.target element is the same as the this element, but couldn't get any improvement.

The way I fixed this problem was a bit of a hack, but works 100%.

dragleave: function(e) {
               // Get the location on screen of the element.
               var rect = this.getBoundingClientRect();

               // Check the mouseEvent coordinates are outside of the rectangle
               if(e.x > rect.left + rect.width || e.x < rect.left
               || e.y > rect.top + rect.height || e.y < rect.top) {
                   $(this).removeClass('red');
               }
           }
  • 1
    Thanks! I can't get this to work in Chrome however. Could you provide a working fiddle of your hack? – pimvdb Jul 18 '12 at 19:31
  • 2
    I was thinking of doing it by checking the coords too. You did most of the work for me, thx :). I had to make some adjustments though: if (e.x >= (rect.left + rect.width) || e.x <= rect.left || e.y >= (rect.top + rect.height) || e.y <= rect.top) – Christof Jul 4 '13 at 14:34
  • It won't work in Chrome because it's event doesn't have e.x and e.y. – Hengjie Sep 1 '13 at 11:25
  • I like this solution. Didn't work in Firefox first. But if you replace e.x with e.clientX and e.y with e.clientY it works. Also works in Chrome. – Nicole Stutz Nov 3 '13 at 15:16
  • Did not work in chrome for me, neither did what Chris or Daniel Stuts suggested – Timo Huovinen Mar 14 '14 at 6:07
9

A very simple solution is to use the pointer-events CSS property. Just set its value to none upon dragstart on every child element. These elements won't trigger mouse-related events anymore, so they won't catch the mouse over them and thus won't trigger the dragleave on the parent.

Don't forget to set this property back to auto when finishing the drag ;)

  • very clever, thanks ;) – yesil Aug 3 '17 at 8:23
  • You're welcome ;) – FruityFred Aug 16 '17 at 7:05
8

You can fix it in Firefox with a little inspiration from the jQuery source code:

dragleave: function(e) {
    var related = e.relatedTarget,
        inside = false;

    if (related !== this) {

        if (related) {
            inside = jQuery.contains(this, related);
        }

        if (!inside) {

            $(this).removeClass('red');
        }
    }

}

Unfortunately it doesn't work in Chrome because relatedTarget appears not to exist on dragleave events, and I assume you're working in Chrome because your example did't work in Firefox. Here's a version with the above code implemented.

  • Thanks a lot, but indeed it's Chrome I'm trying to solve this problem in. – pimvdb Aug 19 '11 at 9:54
  • 5
    @pimvdb I see you've logged a bug, I'll just leave a reference to it here in case anyone else comes across this answer. – robertc Aug 19 '11 at 13:58
  • I did indeed, but I forgot to add a link to it here. Thanks for doing that. – pimvdb Aug 19 '11 at 14:00
  • The Chrome bug has been fixed in the mean time. – phk Jul 14 '17 at 17:21
7

And here it goes, a solution for Chrome:

.bind('dragleave', function(event) {
                    var rect = this.getBoundingClientRect();
                    var getXY = function getCursorPosition(event) {
                        var x, y;

                        if (typeof event.clientX === 'undefined') {
                            // try touch screen
                            x = event.pageX + document.documentElement.scrollLeft;
                            y = event.pageY + document.documentElement.scrollTop;
                        } else {
                            x = event.clientX + document.body.scrollLeft + document.documentElement.scrollLeft;
                            y = event.clientY + document.body.scrollTop + document.documentElement.scrollTop;
                        }

                        return { x: x, y : y };
                    };

                    var e = getXY(event.originalEvent);

                    // Check the mouseEvent coordinates are outside of the rectangle
                    if (e.x > rect.left + rect.width - 1 || e.x < rect.left || e.y > rect.top + rect.height - 1 || e.y < rect.top) {
                        console.log('Drag is really out of area!');
                    }
                })
  • I can't get this to work. It can't find event.clientX – bjornl Dec 14 '12 at 5:20
  • Does it go into «if (typeof event.clientX === 'undefined')»? – Aldekein Dec 17 '12 at 10:19
  • 1
    Worked nicely but there could be another window over the browser, so getting the mouse location and comparing it to the rectangular screen area isn't enough. – H.D. Aug 14 '13 at 11:32
  • Thank you!!! This works totally fine. Tested in Chrome, Firefox and IE11 – Sebastian Buckpesch Jul 11 '14 at 12:22
7

if you are using HTML5, you can get the parent's clientRect:

let rect = document.getElementById("drag").getBoundingClientRect();

Then in the parent.dragleave():

dragleave(e) {
    if(e.clientY < rect.top || e.clientY >= rect.bottom || e.clientX < rect.left || e.clientX >= rect.right) {
        //real leave
    }
}

here is a jsfiddle

  • 2
    Excellent answer. – broc.seib Jan 31 '18 at 14:50
  • Thanks buddy, i like the plain javascript approach. – Tim Gerhard Jun 26 at 12:26
6

Here's another solution using document.elementFromPoint:

 dragleave: function(event) {
   var event = event.originalEvent || event;
   var newElement = document.elementFromPoint(event.pageX, event.pageY);
   if (!this.contains(newElement)) {
     $(this).removeClass('red');
   }
}

Hope this works, here's a fiddle.

  • This seems to work as well. – Woody May 23 '16 at 21:04
  • 2
    This didn't work for me out of the box. I needed to use event.clientX, event.clientY instead, since they're relative to the viewport and not the page. I hope that helps another lost soul out there. – Jon Abrams Jun 7 '16 at 22:34
5

I've written a little library called Dragster to handle this exact issue, works everywhere except silently doing nothing in IE (which doesn't support DOM Event Constructors, but it'd be pretty easy to write something similar using jQuery's custom events)

  • Very useful (at least for me where I only care about Chrome). – M Katz Jul 1 '15 at 3:22
5

A simple solution is to add the css rule pointer-events: none to the child component to prevent the trigger of ondragleave. See example:

function enter(event) {
  document.querySelector('div').style.border = '1px dashed blue';
}

function leave(event) {
  document.querySelector('div').style.border = '';
}
div {
  border: 1px dashed silver;
  padding: 16px;
  margin: 8px;
}

article {
  border: 1px solid silver;
  padding: 8px;
  margin: 8px;
}

p {
  pointer-events: none;
  background: whitesmoke;
}
<article draggable="true">drag me</article>

<div ondragenter="enter(event)" ondragleave="leave(event)">
  drop here
  <p>child not triggering dragleave</p>
</div>

  • I had this same problem and your solution works great. Tip for others, this was my case: if the child element you're trying to make ignore the drag event is the clone of the element being dragged (trying to achieve a visual preview), you can use this inside dragstart when creating the clone: dragged = event.target;clone = dragged.cloneNode();clone.style.pointerEvents = 'none'; – Scaramouche Nov 2 '18 at 17:51
4

Not sure if this cross browser, but I tested in Chrome and it solves my problem:

I want to drag and drop a file over entire page, but my dragleave is fired when i drag over child element. My fix was to look at the x and y of mouse:

i have a div that overlays my entire page, when the page loads i hide it.

when you drag over document i show it, and when you drop on the parent it handles it, and when you leave the parent i check x and y.

$('#draganddrop-wrapper').hide();

$(document).bind('dragenter', function(event) {
    $('#draganddrop-wrapper').fadeIn(500);
    return false;
});

$("#draganddrop-wrapper").bind('dragover', function(event) {
    return false;
}).bind('dragleave', function(event) {
    if( window.event.pageX == 0 || window.event.pageY == 0 ) {
        $(this).fadeOut(500);
        return false;
    }
}).bind('drop', function(event) {
    handleDrop(event);

    $(this).fadeOut(500);
    return false;
});
  • 1
    Hacky but clever. I like. Worked for me. – cupcakekid Jun 9 '15 at 16:35
  • 1
    Oh, how I wish this answer had more votes! Thank you – Kirby Sep 10 '15 at 23:31
4

I was having the same issue and tried to use pk7s solution. It worked but it could be done a little bit better without any extra dom elements.

Basicly the idea is same - add an extra unvisible overlay over droppable area. Only lets do this without any extra dom elements. Here is the part were CSS pseudo-elements come to play.

Javascript

var dragOver = function (e) {
    e.preventDefault();
    this.classList.add('overlay');
};

var dragLeave = function (e) {
    this.classList.remove('overlay');
};


var dragDrop = function (e) {
    this.classList.remove('overlay');
    window.alert('Dropped');
};

var dropArea = document.getElementById('box');

dropArea.addEventListener('dragover', dragOver, false);
dropArea.addEventListener('dragleave', dragLeave, false);
dropArea.addEventListener('drop', dragDrop, false);

CSS

This after rule will create a fully covered overlay for droppable area.

#box.overlay:after {
    content:'';
    position: absolute;
    top: 0;
    left: 0;
    bottom: 0;
    right: 0;
    z-index: 1;
}

Here is the full solution: http://jsfiddle.net/F6GDq/8/

I hope it helps anyone with the same problem.

  • 1
    Occasionally does not work on chrome (does not catch dragleave properly) – Timo Huovinen Mar 14 '14 at 6:13
4

Just check if the dragged over element is a child, if it is, then don't remove your 'dragover' style class. Pretty simple and works for me:

 $yourElement.on('dragleave dragend drop', function(e) {
      if(!$yourElement.has(e.target).length){
           $yourElement.removeClass('is-dragover');
      }
  })
  • Looks like the most simple solution to me, and it solved my problem. Thanks! – Francesco Marchetti-Stasi Feb 1 '18 at 20:29
4

Very simple solution:

parent.addEventListener('dragleave', function(evt) {
    if (!parent.contains(evt.relatedTarget)) {
        // Here it is only dragleave on the parent
    }
}
3

I've stumbled into the same problem and here's my solution - which I think is much easier then above. I'm not sure if it's crossbrowser (might depend on even bubbling order)

I'll use jQuery for simplicity, but solution should be framework independent.

The event bubbles to parent either way so given:

<div class="parent">Parent <span>Child</span></div>

We attach events

el = $('.parent')
setHover = function(){ el.addClass('hovered') }
onEnter  = function(){ setTimeout(setHover, 1) }
onLeave  = function(){ el.removeClass('hovered') } 
$('.parent').bind('dragenter', onEnter).bind('dragleave', onLeave)

And that's about it. :) it works because even though onEnter on child fires before onLeave on parent, we delay it slightly reversing the order, so class is removed first then reaplied after a milisecond.

  • Only thing this snippet does is preventing the 'hovered' class to be removed by reapplying it the next tick cycle (making the 'dragleave' event useless). – null Oct 12 '13 at 8:30
  • It's not useless. If you leave parent it'll work as expected. The power of this solution is it's simplicity, it's not ideal or best there is. Better solution would be to mark an enter on a child, in onleave check if we just entered child, and if so not trigger leave event. It'll hovever need testing, extra guards, checing for grandchildren, etc. – Marcin Raczkowski Oct 15 '13 at 8:46
2

An alternate working solution, a little simpler.

//Note: Due to a bug with Chrome the 'dragleave' event is fired when hovering the dropzone, then
//      we must check the mouse coordinates to be sure that the event was fired only when 
//      leaving the window.
//Facts:
//  - [Firefox/IE] e.originalEvent.clientX < 0 when the mouse is outside the window
//  - [Firefox/IE] e.originalEvent.clientY < 0 when the mouse is outside the window
//  - [Chrome/Opera] e.originalEvent.clientX == 0 when the mouse is outside the window
//  - [Chrome/Opera] e.originalEvent.clientY == 0 when the mouse is outside the window
//  - [Opera(12.14)] e.originalEvent.clientX and e.originalEvent.clientY never get
//                   zeroed if the mouse leaves the windows too quickly.
if (e.originalEvent.clientX <= 0 || e.originalEvent.clientY <= 0) {
  • This doesn't appear to always work in Chrome. I would on occasion receive clientX above 0 when the mouse is outside of the box. Granted, my elements are position:absolute – Hengjie Sep 1 '13 at 11:37
  • Does it happens all the time or only sometimes ? Because if the mouse is moving too fast (ig. outside the window), you might get wrong values. – Profet Sep 1 '13 at 22:19
  • It happens 90% of the time. There are rare cases (1 out of 10 times) where I can make it reach 0. I'll try again moving the mouse slower, but I couldn't say I was moving quickly (perhaps what you'd call normal speed). – Hengjie Sep 2 '13 at 13:22
2

After spending so many hours I got that suggestion working exactly as intended. I wanted to provide a cue only when files were dragged over, and document dragover, dragleave was causing painful flickers on Chrome browser.

This is how I solved it, also throwing in proper cues for user.

$(document).on('dragstart dragenter dragover', function(event) {    
    // Only file drag-n-drops allowed, http://jsfiddle.net/guYWx/16/
    if ($.inArray('Files', event.originalEvent.dataTransfer.types) > -1) {
        // Needed to allow effectAllowed, dropEffect to take effect
        event.stopPropagation();
        // Needed to allow effectAllowed, dropEffect to take effect
        event.preventDefault();

        $('.dropzone').addClass('dropzone-hilight').show();     // Hilight the drop zone
        dropZoneVisible= true;

        // http://www.html5rocks.com/en/tutorials/dnd/basics/
        // http://api.jquery.com/category/events/event-object/
        event.originalEvent.dataTransfer.effectAllowed= 'none';
        event.originalEvent.dataTransfer.dropEffect= 'none';

         // .dropzone .message
        if($(event.target).hasClass('dropzone') || $(event.target).hasClass('message')) {
            event.originalEvent.dataTransfer.effectAllowed= 'copyMove';
            event.originalEvent.dataTransfer.dropEffect= 'move';
        } 
    }
}).on('drop dragleave dragend', function (event) {  
    dropZoneVisible= false;

    clearTimeout(dropZoneTimer);
    dropZoneTimer= setTimeout( function(){
        if( !dropZoneVisible ) {
            $('.dropzone').hide().removeClass('dropzone-hilight'); 
        }
    }, dropZoneHideDelay); // dropZoneHideDelay= 70, but anything above 50 is better
});
2

I wrote a drag-and-drop module called drip-drop that fixes this weirdo behavior, among others. If you're looking for a good low-level drag-and-drop module you can use as the basis for anything (file upload, in-app drag-and-drop, dragging from or to external sources), you should check this module out:

https://github.com/fresheneesz/drip-drop

This is how you would do what you're trying to do in drip-drop:

$('#drop').each(function(node) {
  dripDrop.drop(node, {
    enter: function() {
      $(node).addClass('red')  
    },
    leave: function() {
      $(node).removeClass('red')
    }
  })
})
$('#drag').each(function(node) {
  dripDrop.drag(node, {
    start: function(setData) {
      setData("text", "test") // if you're gonna do text, just do 'text' so its compatible with IE's awful and restrictive API
      return "copy"
    },
    leave: function() {
      $(node).removeClass('red')
    }
  })
})

To do this without a library, the counter technique is what I used in drip-drop, tho the highest rated answer misses important steps that will cause things to break for everything except the first drop. Here's how to do it properly:

var counter = 0;    
$('#drop').bind({
    dragenter: function(ev) {
        ev.preventDefault()
        counter++
        if(counter === 1) {
          $(this).addClass('red')
        }
    },

    dragleave: function() {
        counter--
        if (counter === 0) { 
            $(this).removeClass('red');
        }
    },
    drop: function() {
        counter = 0 // reset because a dragleave won't happen in this case
    }
});
2

This fairly simple solution is working for me so far, assuming your event is attached to each drag element individually.

if (evt.currentTarget.contains(evt.relatedTarget)) {
  return;
}
1

I had a similar problem — my code for hiding the dropzone on dragleave event for body was fired contatantly when hovering child elements making the dropzone flicker in Google Chrome.

I was able to solve this by scheduling the function for hiding dropzone instead of calling it right away. Then, if another dragover or dragleave is fired, the scheduled function call is cancelled.

body.addEventListener('dragover', function() {
    clearTimeout(body_dragleave_timeout);
    show_dropzone();
}, false);

body.addEventListener('dragleave', function() {
    clearTimeout(body_dragleave_timeout);
    body_dragleave_timeout = setTimeout(show_upload_form, 100);
}, false);

dropzone.addEventListener('dragover', function(event) {
    event.preventDefault();
    dropzone.addClass("hover");
}, false);

dropzone.addEventListener('dragleave', function(event) {
    dropzone.removeClass("hover");
}, false);
  • This is what I ended up doing too, but it's still sketchy. – mpen Jan 28 '16 at 22:43
1

"dragleave" event is fired when mouse pointer exits the dragging area of the target container.

Which makes a lot of sense as in many cases only the parent may be droppable and not the descendants. I think event.stopPropogation() should have handled this case but seems like it doesn't do the trick.

Above mentioned some solutions do seem to work for most of the cases, but fails in case of those children which does not support dragenter / dragleave events, such as iframe.

1 workaround is to check the event.relatedTarget and verify if it resides inside the container then ignore the dragleave event as I have done here:

function isAncestor(node, target) {
    if (node === target) return false;
    while(node.parentNode) {
        if (node.parentNode === target)
            return true;
        node=node.parentNode;
    }
    return false;
}

var container = document.getElementById("dropbox");
container.addEventListener("dragenter", function() {
    container.classList.add("dragging");
});

container.addEventListener("dragleave", function(e) {
    if (!isAncestor(e.relatedTarget, container))
        container.classList.remove("dragging");
});

You can find a working fiddle here!

0

Here is another approach based on the timing of events.

The dragenter event dispatched from the child element can be captured by the parent element and it always occurs before the dragleave. The timing between these two events is really short, shorter than any possible human mouse action. So, the idea is to memorize the time when a dragenter happens and filter dragleave events that occurs "not too quickly" after ...

This short example works on Chrome and Firefox:

var node = document.getElementById('someNodeId'),
    on   = function(elem, evt, fn) { elem.addEventListener(evt, fn, false) },
    time = 0;

on(node, 'dragenter', function(e) {
    e.preventDefault();
    time = (new Date).getTime();
    // Drag start
})

on(node, 'dragleave', function(e) {
    e.preventDefault();
    if ((new Date).getTime() - time > 5) {
         // Drag end
    }
})
0

pimvdb..

Why don't you try out using drop instead of dragleave. It worked for me. hope this solves your problem.

Please check the jsFiddle : http://jsfiddle.net/HU6Mk/118/

$('#drop').bind({
                 dragenter: function() {
                     $(this).addClass('red');
                 },

                 drop: function() {
                     $(this).removeClass('red');
                 }
                });

$('#drag').bind({
                 dragstart: function(e) {
                     e.allowedEffect = "copy";
                     e.setData("text/plain", "test");
                 }
                });
  • 2
    If the user changes their mind and drags the file back out of the browser, this will remain red. – ZachB May 2 '15 at 23:53
0

You can use a timeout with a transitioning flag and listen on the top element. dragenter / dragleave from child events will bubble up to the container.

Since dragenter on the child element fires before dragleave of the container, we will set the flag show as transitioning for 1ms... the dragleave listener will check for the flag before the 1ms is up.

The flag will be true only during transitions to child elements, and will not be true when transitioning to a parent element (of the container)

var $el = $('#drop-container'),
    transitioning = false;

$el.on('dragenter', function(e) {

  // temporarily set the transitioning flag for 1 ms
  transitioning = true;
  setTimeout(function() {
    transitioning = false;
  }, 1);

  $el.toggleClass('dragging', true);

  e.preventDefault();
  e.stopPropagation();
});

// dragleave fires immediately after dragenter, before 1ms timeout
$el.on('dragleave', function(e) {

  // check for transitioning flag to determine if were transitioning to a child element
  // if not transitioning, we are leaving the container element
  if (transitioning === false) {
    $el.toggleClass('dragging', false);
  }

  e.preventDefault();
  e.stopPropagation();
});

// to allow drop event listener to work
$el.on('dragover', function(e) {
  e.preventDefault();
  e.stopPropagation();
});

$el.on('drop', function(e) {
  alert("drop!");
});

jsfiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/ilovett/U7mJj/

0

You need to remove the pointer events for all child objects of the drag target.

function disableChildPointerEvents(targetObj) {
        var cList = parentObj.childNodes
        for (i = 0; i < cList.length; ++i) {
            try{
                cList[i].style.pointerEvents = 'none'
                if (cList[i].hasChildNodes()) disableChildPointerEvents(cList[i])
            } catch (err) {
                //
            }
        }
    }
0

use this code http://jsfiddle.net/HU6Mk/258/:

$('#drop').bind({
         dragenter: function() {
             $(this).addClass('red');
         },

         dragleave: function(event) {
             var x = event.clientX, y = event.clientY,
                 elementMouseIsOver = document.elementFromPoint(x, y);
             if(!$(elementMouseIsOver).closest('.red').length) {
                 $(this).removeClass('red');
             }
        }
    });
0

Just try to use the event.eventPhase. It will set to 2 (Event.AT_TARGET) only if the target ist entered, otherwise it is set to 3 (Event.BUBBLING_PHASE).

I'fe used the eventPhase to bind or unbind the dragleave Event.

$('.dropzone').on('dragenter', function(e) {

  if(e.eventPhase === Event.AT_TARGET) {

    $('.dropzone').addClass('drag-over');

    $('.dropzone').on('dragleave', function(e) {
      $('.dropzone').removeClass('drag-over');
    });

  }else{

    $('.dropzone').off('dragleave');

  }
})

Guido

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