3

I've written a little script to supply a password to sshfs, but for some reason sshfs isn't grabbing the password. Any pointers? (PS I know ssh keys are better/safer, but politics where I work prevents key based authentication being setup on the target server - sigh... ).

#!/usr/bin/expect
# NOT WORKING!!
exp_internal 1
spawn sshfs server:/export/pc_storage /home/sonia/mnt/server
expect {
    "assword:" {
        send "secret\r\r"
        send_user "\n"
    }
    timeout {
        send_user "timed out!\n"
     }
}

To terminate the password, I've tried \r \n \r\r - none work.

Debugging output, showing that password prompt is triggering:

spawn sshfs server:/export/pc_storage /home/sonia/mnt/server
parent: waiting for sync byte
parent: telling child to go ahead
parent: now unsynchronized from child
spawn: returns {17532}

expect: does "" (spawn_id exp6) match glob pattern "assword:"? no
pcuser@server's password: 
expect: does "pcuser@server's password: " (spawn_id exp6) match glob pattern "assword:"? yes
expect: set expect_out(0,string) "assword:"
expect: set expect_out(spawn_id) "exp6"
expect: set expect_out(buffer) "pcuser@server's password:"
send: sending "secret\r\r" to { exp6 }

% uname -a
Linux zapote 2.6.38-10-generic-pae #46-Ubuntu SMP Tue Jun 28 16:54:49 UTC 2011 i686 i686 i386 GNU/Linux

% sshfs -V
SSHFS version 2.2
FUSE library version: 2.8.4
fusermount version: 2.8.4
using FUSE kernel interface version 7.12

SOLVED:

(I can't post an answer as I don't have 100 points - double sigh)

I need to fix this up a bit... For example I hard coded PS1 in my .bashrc to "bash_prompt" (I use zsh by default).

#!/usr/bin/expect

# FIX: get homedir from env, set bash prompt somehow...

set timeout 30

spawn /bin/bash
expect "bash_prompt"
send_user "Shell spawned.\n"

send -- "sudo umount /home/sonia/mnt/server &> /dev/null\r"
expect "bash_prompt"

send -- "sshfs server:/export/pc_storage /home/sonia/mnt/server\r"
expect {
    "assword:" {
        send "secret\r"
        send_user "\n"
    }
    timeout {
        send_user "timed out!\n"
    }
}
expect "bash_prompt"
  • One \r should be correct. Try adding expect eof to the end of your script and let us know what happens. – glenn jackman Aug 19 '11 at 10:25
5

Rather than use Expect, you can just supply the password directly. Try this:

echo your-password | sshfs server:/export/pc_storage /home/sonia/mnt/server -o password_stdin

Not sure if you can make this work with your password policies, but its worth a shot.

  • Thanks Jim. If you read the question I put my solution in the question but couldn't mark it as "solved" as I didn't have enough points at the time. It's a long time since I asked this question, so I can't remember the details. However, echo doesn't work with ssh (and probably not with sshfs) as the programs are written to ignore stdin ie they only accept input from an interactive terminal. Hence the use of expect. For example see andre.frimberger.de/index.php/linux/… – Sonia Hamilton Dec 7 '13 at 9:23
  • Hi Sonia, I see now that it was marked resolved. I have been using this trick to get sshfs to authenticate on my mac, and it works just fine. I'm only using it to authenticate local vms though, so I'm not sure if there are other environment setups that may cause sshfs to ignore stdin. – Jim Clouse Dec 9 '13 at 21:38
  • This solution works! – Kadir Dec 9 '14 at 11:25
2

I need to fix this up a bit... For example I hard coded PS1 in my .bashrc to "bash_prompt" (I use zsh by default).

#!/usr/bin/expect

# FIX: get homedir from env, set bash prompt somehow...

set timeout 30

spawn /bin/bash
expect "bash_prompt"
send_user "Shell spawned.\n"

send -- "sudo umount /home/sonia/mnt/server &> /dev/null\r"
expect "bash_prompt"

send -- "sshfs server:/export/pc_storage /home/sonia/mnt/server\r"
expect {
    "assword:" {
        send "secret\r"
        send_user "\n"
    }
    timeout {
        send_user "timed out!\n"
    }
}
expect "bash_prompt"
  • please explain the secret sauce. the spawn /bin/bash and send -- " – marinara Apr 12 '14 at 1:39
  • spawn starts up a separate process for the script to run in. On some machines my default shell might be zsh or ksh; I want a consistent environment therefore I start up bash (and nowadays I would do something like bash --rcfile ~/.bashrc_expect). send (and other expect commands) take options. For example send -i PID allows you to send commands to a process PID. A -- signals the end of options and disables further option processing. Any arguments after the -- are treated as filenames and arguments. -- is *nix convention. – Sonia Hamilton Apr 12 '14 at 8:47
0

\r\r does not seem right. Have you tried \r\n?

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