42

I'm testing a website that includes a logo, and I want to make sure the logo does not appear on some pages.

How can I assert that an element does NOT exist? I checked the Playwright assertions documentation, but it only has examples of checking for things that do exist.

async assertNoLog(): Promise<boolean> {
  await this.page.locator('div#page-id'); // now the page has loaded
  // How do I check if logo is on page without throwing an error if it is missing
}

I'm not sure what to write here to assert that my element is not found anywhere on the page.

1
  • I think its important to differentiate here that logo may attach to the page DOM as element but just should not be visible for the requirement to begin with , NOT until its gone. Commented Feb 29 at 12:47

7 Answers 7

30

I wanted to know that an element wasn't on screen, but I also wanted to wait until it was gone, and this is the way to do that:

await expect(locator).toHaveCount(0);

Found here

1
  • Unlike await expect(locator).not.toBeAttached(), this works regardless of whether you're going from 3 elements down to 0, or from 1 element down to 0. Use await expect(locator).not.toBeAttached() if you want that implicit single element assertion guarantee. Both idioms are useful in different contexts.
    – ggorlen
    Commented Nov 16, 2023 at 16:17
25

To check it instantly without auto-waiting, you can use count() and assert that it returns 0.

expect(await page.locator('.notexists').count()).toEqual(0);

If you want Playwright to wait until the count becomes 0 (as recommended by web-first assertions) then you should await the expect and use toHaveCount()

await expect(page.locator('.notexists')).toHaveCount(0);

https://playwright.dev/docs/api/class-locator#locator-count https://playwright.dev/docs/api/class-locatorassertions#locator-assertions-to-have-count

10
  • 2
    I was missing an await. (Still weird.) Commented Dec 15, 2022 at 14:03
  • 1
    My Visual Studio Code puts 3 little dots to highlight unnecessary awaits so that makes it easy to delete them. Then I can just add "await" to the beginning of pretty much everything.
    – emery
    Commented Dec 18, 2022 at 19:09
  • 2
    Great idea! I've managed to set up the no-floating-promises ESLint rule now. Commented Dec 19, 2022 at 8:44
  • 3
    Erik's answer is now preferred; follows Playwright guidelines on using web first assertions.
    – Dennis
    Commented Feb 16, 2023 at 8:02
  • 2
    The await should be before expect to follow playwright guideline of web first assertion playwright.dev/docs/best-practices#use-web-first-assertions. So it should be await expect(page.locator('.notexists')).toEqual(0); or await expect(page.locator('.notexists')).toHaveCount(0);something like this. This is not exactly right but somewhere along the lines that await should be before expect.
    – utkarsh-k
    Commented Jul 17, 2023 at 7:32
12

https://playwright.dev/docs/api/class-locatorassertions#locator-assertions-to-be-attached

toBeAttached

Added in: v1.33

Ensures that Locator points to an attached DOM node.

With this, now we can do:

expect(locator).not.toBeAttached() 
4
  • 1
    This should be the accepted answer - clean and with no magic constants like zero in "toHaveCount(0)"
    – Dušan
    Commented Aug 24, 2023 at 16:51
  • @Dušan I agree this probably is better, but generally speaking, 0 isn't exactly a magic constant under the traditional definition. It's not subject to change and always means 0. For example, writing for (let i = 0; i < arr.length; i++) {} does not use "magic constants" any more than this does. One potentially useful feature in the toHaveCount(0) approach is that it doesn't fail if the count goes from 3 to 0, whereas this only handles 1 to 0.
    – ggorlen
    Commented Nov 16, 2023 at 16:09
  • 1
    @JohnSpencer don't forget to await expect(locator).not.toBeAttached().
    – ggorlen
    Commented Nov 16, 2023 at 16:16
  • Personally prefer closer to the user assertions like tobevisible. But good idea too. Commented Dec 20, 2023 at 2:07
6

You could try using not before toBeVisible assertion on the routes you don't want it to be.

async assertNoLog(): Promise<boolean> {
  await this.page.locator('div#page-id'); // now the page has loaded

  // Check if the logo is on the page without throwing an error if it is missing
await expect(page.locator('div#page-id')).not.toBeVisible();
}

It's recommended to use more direct assertions when available:

await expect(page.locator('div#page-id')).toBeHidden();

Check: https://playwright.dev/docs/best-practices

1
  • locator.toBeHidden() is more readable.
    – as - if
    Commented May 30 at 22:00
4

You can play with the conditions you expect your element to have. For example, at Playwright's homepage you expect an element by the class .navbar__brand to be visible, but you also expect an element by the class .notexists NOT to be visible (in this case this element would not exist). Then you can do:

test('element does exist @pass', async ({ page }) => {
  await page.goto('https://playwright.dev/');
  const locator = await page.locator('.navbar__brand').isVisible();
  expect(locator).toBeTruthy();
});

test('element does NOT exist @fail', async ({ page }) => {
  await page.goto('https://playwright.dev/');
  const locator = await page.locator('.notexists').isVisible();
  expect(locator).toBeTruthy();
});

Doing this, of course, would return the same results:

test('element does exist @pass', async ({ page }) => {
  await page.goto('https://playwright.dev/');
  expect(await page.locator('.navbar__brand').isVisible()).toBe(true);
});

test('element does NOT exist @fail', async ({ page }) => {
  await page.goto('https://playwright.dev/');
  expect(await page.locator('.notexists').isVisible()).toBe(true);
});

As I say, the element's conditions are up to you. For example, if you want to assert an element with visibility:hidden is also not present in the DOM, because it simply shouldn't be, you can wrap the visibility and a .isHidden() conditions within a if/else, etc. And of course, feel free to play with booleans (toBe(true)/toBe(false), toBeTruthy()/toBeFalsy()).

These are not the most elegant solutions out there, but I hope they can help.

2
  • 2
    I was tempted to downvote this because it's not a very elegant solution as compared to using count() but it does provide some very useful information.
    – emery
    Commented Aug 2, 2022 at 22:46
  • Warning: this doesn't use web-first assertions.
    – ggorlen
    Commented Oct 3, 2023 at 20:53
2

You could also use Locator#waitFor method with 'detached' state. The benefit is that is also waits for some time for element state to change. It is helpful if detaching an element from DOM takes some time.

https://playwright.dev/docs/next/api/class-locator#locator-wait-for

Example:

await page.locator('someSelector').waitFor({ state: "detached" })

Other states allow for verification whether an element is visible / hidden

0

Another way using Chai assertions is using the "!" symbol before the element:

should.exist(!your selector here)

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