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I am interested in storing a set of users that have personality scores. I would like to get them to be more connected (closer?) to each other based on formulas that are applied to their scores. The more similar the users are, the more connected or closer to each other they are (like in a cluster). The closest nodes are to one-another, the more similar they are.

I currently do this over multiple steps (some in SQL and other in code) from a relational database.

Most posts out there and documentation seems to focus on how to get started and what the advantages are at a high level compared to relational databases.

I am wondering if Graph databases are better suited for this and would do most of the heavy lifting out of the box or more natively. Any details are greatly appreciated.

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You could consider modeling it like this:

Where a vertex type/label named Score_range was introduced, together with the label User(with property score).

User vertices are connected to Score_range vertex like User with score: 101 is connected to Score_range(vertexID=100) which stands for [100, 110).

Thus, those vertices with closer score are more connected/clusterred in this graph, and in your applicaiton, you need to make connection changes when the score are recaculated/changed to the graph database.

Then, either to run cluster algorithm(i.e. Louvain) on the whole graph or graph query to find path between any two user nodes(i.e. FIND PATH in Nebula Graph, an opensource distributed graph database speaks opencypher), the closeness will be reflected.

But, I think due to this connection/closness is actually numerical/sortable, simply handling this closeness relationship may not need a graph database from the context you already provided.

PS. I drew a picture of a graph in the above schema: schema:https://imgur.com/EBI55SH

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  • Thank you for this helpful and detailed answer. This is very interesting, score range vertices seem like a great way to tackle this. > simply handling this closeness relationship may not need a graph database Why not? I thought it was a powerful way of abstracting similarity in scores between Persen vertices. This way, we would have a few scores and we'd assume the closest Persen vertices have the most "similar" scores instead of querying in SQL, sorting and comparing all their scores after. Do you think that your example there could work with hundreds of scores and score_ranges ?
    – Emanuel
    Mar 14, 2022 at 14:41
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    Dear @Emanuel, Thanks, the reason I mention that "it may not need a GDBMS" is: if the score is only a col of the person table, in a tabular DB, an index on the score(a duplicated ordered by score replica of person table) can also address the score range query? While with GDBMS we could have more abilities to consider this clonesnes as one of relationships and on top of that, the connection exploration would provide more abilities that a tabular DB won't provide :)
    – Wey Gu
    Mar 17, 2022 at 2:00
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    > Do you think that your example there could work with hundreds of scores and score_ranges ? Hundreds level of scores and score_ranges won't be challenges, while the blanace/tradoff on the fine-grained of the score_range would be explored from your side, if it's too coarse-grained, the closeness won't be distinguished, and the supernode problem will be encountered(that one score_range node is connected to 10K node).
    – Wey Gu
    Mar 17, 2022 at 2:05
  • > if the score is only a col of the person table, in a tabular DB, an index on the score makes sense. In our case, it would be a be more complex as, yes we would like the users that are closer in some factors to be closer together, but in some cases we would like them to have things in common (more binary) and the more things they have in common, we would increase their proximity in the graph, but with diminishing returns.
    – Emanuel
    Mar 17, 2022 at 14:36
  • Now I understand it more from "but in some cases we would like them to have things in common (more binary) and the more things they have in common", looking forward to your exploration with Graph DB, feel free to ping me when I could help/learn from your use case ;). Cheers and happy graphing. BR//Wey
    – Wey Gu
    Mar 18, 2022 at 3:03

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