332

I ran across enable_shared_from_this while reading the Boost.Asio examples and after reading the documentation I am still lost for how this should correctly be used. Can someone please give me an example and/or and explanation of when using this class makes sense.

347

It enables you to get a valid shared_ptr instance to this, when all you have is this. Without it, you would have no way of getting a shared_ptr to this, unless you already had one as a member. This example from the boost documentation for enable_shared_from_this:

class Y: public enable_shared_from_this<Y>
{
public:

    shared_ptr<Y> f()
    {
        return shared_from_this();
    }
}

int main()
{
    shared_ptr<Y> p(new Y);
    shared_ptr<Y> q = p->f();
    assert(p == q);
    assert(!(p < q || q < p)); // p and q must share ownership
}

The method f() returns a valid shared_ptr, even though it had no member instance. Note that you cannot simply do this:

class Y: public enable_shared_from_this<Y>
{
public:

    shared_ptr<Y> f()
    {
        return shared_ptr<Y>(this);
    }
}

The shared pointer that this returned will have a different reference count from the "proper" one, and one of them will end up losing and holding a dangling reference when the object is deleted.

enable_shared_from_this has become part of C++ 11 standard. You can also get it from there as well as from boost.

  • 186
    +1. The key point is that the "obvious" technique of just returning shared_ptr<Y>(this) is broken, because this winds up creating multiple distinct shared_ptr objects with separate reference counts. For this reason you must never create more than one shared_ptr from the same raw pointer. – j_random_hacker Apr 3 '09 at 2:31
  • 2
    It should be noted that in C++11 and later, it is perfectly valid to use a std::shared_ptr constructor on a raw pointer if it inherits from std::enable_shared_from_this. I don' t know if Boost's semantics were updated to support this. – Matthew Oct 10 '17 at 20:51
  • 6
    @MatthewHolder Do you have a quote for this? On cppreference.com I read "Constructing a std::shared_ptr for an object that is already managed by another std::shared_ptr will not consult the internally stored weak reference and thus will lead to undefined behavior." (en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/memory/enable_shared_from_this) – Thorbjørn Lindeijer May 1 '18 at 14:01
  • 3
    Why can't you just do shared_ptr<Y> q = p? – Dan M. May 8 '18 at 14:28
  • 1
    @ThorbjørnLindeijer, you are right, it's C++17 and later. Some implementations did follow the C++16 semantics before it was released. The proper handling for C++11 to C++14 should be to use std::make_shared<T>. – Matthew Mar 7 at 20:04
187

from Dr Dobbs article on weak pointers, I think this example is easier to understand (source: http://drdobbs.com/cpp/184402026):

...code like this won't work correctly:

int *ip = new int;
shared_ptr<int> sp1(ip);
shared_ptr<int> sp2(ip);

Neither of the two shared_ptr objects knows about the other, so both will try to release the resource when they are destroyed. That usually leads to problems.

Similarly, if a member function needs a shared_ptr object that owns the object that it's being called on, it can't just create an object on the fly:

struct S
{
  shared_ptr<S> dangerous()
  {
     return shared_ptr<S>(this);   // don't do this!
  }
};

int main()
{
   shared_ptr<S> sp1(new S);
   shared_ptr<S> sp2 = sp1->dangerous();
   return 0;
}

This code has the same problem as the earlier example, although in a more subtle form. When it is constructed, the shared_ptr object sp1 owns the newly allocated resource. The code inside the member function S::dangerous doesn't know about that shared_ptr object, so the shared_ptr object that it returns is distinct from sp1. Copying the new shared_ptr object to sp2 doesn't help; when sp2 goes out of scope, it will release the resource, and when sp1 goes out of scope, it will release the resource again.

The way to avoid this problem is to use the class template enable_shared_from_this. The template takes one template type argument, which is the name of the class that defines the managed resource. That class must, in turn, be derived publicly from the template; like this:

struct S : enable_shared_from_this<S>
{
  shared_ptr<S> not_dangerous()
  {
    return shared_from_this();
  }
};

int main()
{
   shared_ptr<S> sp1(new S);
   shared_ptr<S> sp2 = sp1->not_dangerous();
   return 0;
}

When you do this, keep in mind that the object on which you call shared_from_this must be owned by a shared_ptr object. This won't work:

int main()
{
   S *p = new S;
   shared_ptr<S> sp2 = p->not_dangerous();     // don't do this
}
28

Here's my explanation, from a nuts and bolts perspective (top answer didn't 'click' with me). *Note that this is the result of investigating the source for shared_ptr and enable_shared_from_this that comes with Visual Studio 2012. Perhaps other compilers implement enable_shared_from_this differently...*

enable_shared_from_this<T> adds a private weak_ptr<T> instance to T which holds the 'one true reference count' for the instance of T.

So, when you first create a shared_ptr<T> onto a new T*, that T*'s internal weak_ptr gets initialized with a refcount of 1. The new shared_ptr basically backs onto this weak_ptr.

T can then, in its methods, call shared_from_this to obtain an instance of shared_ptr<T> that backs onto the same internally stored reference count. This way, you always have one place where T*'s ref-count is stored rather than having multiple shared_ptr instances that don't know about each other, and each think they are the shared_ptr that is in charge of ref-counting T and deleting it when their ref-count reaches zero.

  • 1
    This is correct, and the really important part is So, when you first create... because that is a requirement (as you say the weak_ptr isn't initialized until you pass the objects pointer into a shared_ptr ctor!) and this requirement is where things can go horribly wrong if you are not careful. If you create no shared_ptr before calling shared_from_this you get UB - likewise if you create more than one shared_ptr you get UB too. You have to somehow make sure you create a shared_ptr exactly once. – AnorZaken Sep 1 '16 at 16:12
  • 2
    In other words the whole idea of enable_shared_from_thisis brittle to begin with since the point is to be able to get a shared_ptr<T> from a T*, but in reality when you get a pointer T* t it is generally not safe to assume anything about it already being shared or not, and making the wrong guess is UB. – AnorZaken Sep 1 '16 at 16:17
  • "internal weak_ptr gets initialized with a refcount of 1" weak ptr to T are non owning smart ptr to T. A weak ptr is a owning smart ref to enough information to make a owning ptr that is a "copy" of other owning ptr. A weak ptr has no ref count. It has access to a ref count, like all owning ref. – curiousguy Nov 28 '17 at 23:43
3

Note that using a boost::intrusive_ptr does not suffer from this problem. This is often a more convenient way to get around this issue.

  • Yes, but enable_shared_from_this allows you to work with an API which specifically accepts shared_ptr<>. In my opinion, such an API is usually Doing It Wrong (as it's better to let something higher in the stack own the memory) but if you're forced to work with such an API, this is a good option. – cdunn2001 Jun 5 '13 at 14:55
  • 1
    Better to stay within the standard as much as you can. – Sergei Feb 27 at 0:15
3

It's exactly the same in c++11 and later: It is to enable the ability to return this as a shared pointer since this gives you a raw pointer.

in other word, it allows you to turn code like this

class Node {
public:
    Node* getParent const() {
        if (m_parent) {
            return m_parent;
        } else {
            return this;
        }
    }

private:

    Node * m_parent = nullptr;
};           

into this:

class Node : std::enable_shared_from_this<Node> {
public:
    std::shared_ptr<Node> getParent const() {
        std::shared_ptr<Node> parent = m_parent.lock();
        if (parent) {
            return parent;
        } else {
            return shared_from_this();
        }
    }

private:

    std::weak_ptr<Node> m_parent;
};           
  • This will only work if these objects are always managed by a shared_ptr. You might want to change the interface to make sure it's the case. – curiousguy Nov 28 '17 at 23:47
  • 1
    You are absolutely correct @curiousguy. This goes without saying. I also like typedef-ing all of my shared_ptr to improve readability when defining my public APIs. For example, instead of std::shared_ptr<Node> getParent const(), I would normally expose it as NodePtr getParent const() instead. If you absolutely need access to the internal raw pointer (best example: dealing with a C library), there's std::shared_ptr<T>::get for that, which I hate mentioning because I've this raw pointer accessor used too many times for the wrong reason. – mchiasson Dec 10 '17 at 15:49
-3

Another way is to add a weak_ptr<Y> m_stub member into the class Y. Then write:

shared_ptr<Y> Y::f()
{
    return m_stub.lock();
}

Useful when you cannot change the class you are deriving from (e.g. extending other people's library). Do not forget to initialize the member, e.g. by m_stub = shared_ptr<Y>(this), its is valid even during a constructor.

It is OK if there are more stubs like this one in inheritance hierarchy, it will not prevent destruction of the object.

Edit: As correctly pointed out by user nobar, the code would destroy Y object when the assignment is finished and temporary variables are destroyed. Therefore my answer is incorrect.

  • 4
    If your intention here is to produce a shared_ptr<> which does not delete its pointee, this is overkill. You can simply say return shared_ptr<Y>(this, no_op_deleter); where no_op_deleter is a unary function object taking Y* and doing nothing. – John Zwinck Jan 16 '11 at 18:23
  • 2
    It seems unlikely that this is a working solution. m_stub = shared_ptr<Y>(this) will construct and immediately destruct a temporary shared_ptr from this. When this statement is over, this will be deleted and all subsequent references will be dangling. – nobar Feb 23 '11 at 19:23
  • 2
    The author acknowledges this answer is wrong so he could probably just delete it. But he last logged in 4.5 years so isn't likely to do so - could someone with higher powers remove this red herring? – Tom Goodfellow Apr 11 '16 at 7:19
  • if you look at the implementation of enable_shared_from_this, it keeps a weak_ptr of itself (populated by the ctor), returned as a shared_ptr when you call shared_from_this. In other word, you are duplicating what enable_shared_from_this already provides. – mchiasson Dec 10 '17 at 16:30

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