3

When an exception is thrown, how can I catch it and then continue execution starting from the line that caused the error?

EDIT: Our program communicates with Indesign Server which crashes all the time and throws random COM related errors (these errors have to do with bugs in the Server itself). Indesign Server also takes a very long time to process commands so when it crashes, we want to avoid restarting execution. Instead, we want to continue from the line that caused the exception. Any line in the program can cause an exception. So technically, we cannot use a loop.

  • Do you mean the next line? Or the line that actually threw the exception? – dlev Aug 19 '11 at 17:44
  • @dlev: I think he means the line after the line that threw the exception. He's probably got one try/catch instead of more than one. – user195488 Aug 19 '11 at 17:44
  • 1
    why would you do something like this? – Carsten Aug 19 '11 at 17:45
  • 4
    Please let's not resurrect the ancient evil whose name is "On Error Resume Next". – Dan Bryant Aug 19 '11 at 17:45
  • @Dan Bryant: +1! That was the first thing that went through my mind when I read this question. Unfortunately many of the answers, though correct, are resurrecting it. – Paul Sasik Aug 19 '11 at 17:49
12

When an exception is thrown, how can I catch it and then continue execution starting from the line that caused the error? (Not the next line; retry the line that caused the exception.)

Do not try to do that. You're approaching this problem from the wrong direction.

The problem is that you have an unreliable subsystem. You have a desired policy for dealing with that unreliable subsystem, which is to retry the operation until it succeeds. If that's the case then don't put that logic in the line-of-business code which uses the subsystem. The line-of-business code should be about the business logic, not about the mechanism you choose to deal with the flaky subsystem. Isolate the mechanism to a specific class which makes the unreliable subsystem into a reliable subsystem.

That is, build a proxy class that has the same interface as the unreliable subsystem, and isolate your retry logic into that proxy class. Then the line-of-business code can use the proxy class as a reliable subsystem.

That said, a policy of "retry it until it works" is possibly a bad policy. If the subsystem is genuinely broken and not just flaky in some transient way, then "retry until it works" means "wait forever", and most users do not like waiting forever. For example, if the exception is a result of a router being unplugged rather than some transient condition then sitting there in a loop until someone plugs the router back in seems like a bad idea.

  • Retry on failure is also not a pattern that composes well with itself and should be used sparingly. It's all to easy to create systems that severly delay reporting real error conditions because of cascading retry logic. – LBushkin Aug 19 '11 at 21:08
  • @LBushkin: I agree completely. See blogs.msdn.com/b/oldnewthing/archive/2005/11/07/489807.aspx for some anecdotes. – Eric Lippert Aug 19 '11 at 21:14
  • 1
    Most users don't like waiting forever - can you prove that? Make a few users wait forever and then ask them if they liked it. You might be surprised by what you find! – configurator Aug 31 '11 at 17:12
3

If you're looking for something general purpose then using a lambda would do the trick. For example

public static class Exception {
  public static void Continue(Action action) {
    try {
      action();  
    } catch { 
      // Log 
    }
  }
}

Exception.Continue(() => Statement1());
Exception.Continue(() => Statement2());

I wouldn't consider this an ideal solution though for large scale use. It causes an extra delegate allocation, delegate invocation and method invocation for every statement you use this on. Instead I would focus on identifying the functions which are causing you problems and add explicit wrappers for them individually.

  • 5
    Interesting approach, but it would probably be more descriptive if it were invoked using Pretend.EverythingIsFine(() => SomethingDangerous()); – Dan Bryant Aug 19 '11 at 17:51
  • 4
    @Dan i prefer Ignorance.IsBliss(() => ...) :) – JaredPar Aug 19 '11 at 17:53
3

You would have to surround any line that could throw an exception in its own try/catch block to accomplish that.

So instead of

try
{
    StatementOne();  // Exception thrown here
    StatementTwo();
}
catch (SOneException) { ... }

You would have to do:

try
{
    StatementOne();
}
catch (SOneException) { ... }

StatementTwo();

If you need to retry an operation due to a (hopefully transient) exception, you can have a method like this:

public static class ExceptionHelper
{
    public static void TryNTimesAndThenThrow(Action statement, int retryCount)
    {
        bool keepTrying = false;
        do
        {
            try
            {
                statement();
                keepTrying = false;
            }
            catch (Exception)
            {
                if (retryCount > 0)
                {
                    keepTrying = true;
                    retryCount--;
                }
                else
                {
                    // If it doesn't work here, assume it's broken and rethrow
                    throw;
                }
            }
        } while (keepTrying)
    }
}

Then you can just write:

ExceptionHelper.TryNTimesAndThenThrow(() => MightThrowATransientException(), 3);

Keep in mind both methods should be used sparingly. The former will clutter your code quite a bit, while the latter could end up taking a lot more time than you think (since its often a better idea to simply alert the user if something unexpected occurs. Thus the emphasis on a transient exception that you really do expect will disappear if you just try again.)

0

You could do something like this:

                //Retry logic on opening the connection
                int retries = 0;
                openconnection:
                    try
                    {
                        connection.Open();
                    }
                    catch
                    {
                        retries++;
                        //Wait 2 seconds
                        System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(2000);
                        if (retries < MAXRETRIES)
                        {
                            goto openconnection;
                        }
                        else
                        {
                            throw;
                        }
                    }
  • This would require lot's of labels and goto statements as any one of the program's lines can throw an exception. Maybe there's a way to use .NET reflection. – user666423 Aug 19 '11 at 17:58
  • This works well if there are intermittent exceptions we want to ignore or retry. In most cases, I would not use this approach, but here I can execute the same line until success or ultimately failure. Also, I have isolated the line I want to retry. You are correct if you have lots of lines that could throw and exception more labels would be required and that would be messy. – Jon Raynor Aug 19 '11 at 18:02

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