I have a navigation bar on the left hand side of my page, and I want it to stretch to 100% of the page height. Not just the height of the viewport, but including the areas hidden until you scroll. I don't want to use javascript to accomplish this.

Can it be done in HTML/CSS?

12 Answers 12

Here is the solution I finally came up with when using a div as a container for a dynamic background.

  • Remove the z-index for non-background uses.
  • Remove left or right for a full height column.
  • Remove top or bottom for a full width row.

EDIT 1: CSS below has been edited because it did not show correctly in FF and Chrome. moved position:relative to be on the HTML and set the body to height:100% instead of min-height:100%.

EDIT 2: Added extra comments to CSS. Added some more instructions above.

The CSS:

html{
    min-height:100%;/* make sure it is at least as tall as the viewport */
    position:relative;
}
body{
    height:100%; /* force the BODY element to match the height of the HTML element */
}
#cloud-container{
    position:absolute;
    top:0;
    bottom:0;
    left:0;
    right:0;
    overflow:hidden;
    z-index:-1; /* Remove this line if it's not going to be a background! */
}

The html:

<!doctype html>
<html>
<body>
    <div id="cloud-container"></div>
</body>
</html>

Why?

html{min-height:100%;position:relative;}

Without this the cloud-container DIV is removed from the HTML's layout context. position: relative ensures that the DIV remains inside the HTML box when it is drawn so that bottom:0 refers to the bottom of the HTML box. You can also use height:100% on the cloud-container as it now refers to the height of the HTML tag and not the viewport.

  • 1
    This worked perfectly. Thanks! – Sterling Bourne Oct 16 '12 at 20:27
  • this is great, but wont center. any fix for that? margin:0 auto; isn't working. – cream Oct 26 '12 at 7:48
  • 3
    i'm an idiot width:80%; margin:0 10%; – cream Oct 26 '12 at 7:56
  • 1
    The z-index is there because this is a snippet for a moving background I did and I wanted to make sure the div stayed in the background. It's not needed for normal elements. – Knyri Jan 20 '14 at 22:10
  • 3
    This is excellent. I've been doing CSS for 15 years and it never clicked that positioning to the <html> and positioning to the viewport were two separate things. Thank you! – Beejamin Aug 6 '15 at 5:49

With HTML5, the easiest way is simply to do height: 100vh. Where 'vh' stands for viewport height of the browser window. Responsive to resizing of browser and mobile devices.

  • 13
    Missing the point completely. OP is asking for height of page, not height of window / viewport. – Greg Jul 27 '15 at 9:06
  • 5
    Document height, not viewport height. – punkbit Feb 23 '16 at 15:55
  • 5
    same comment as above – ericn Feb 26 '16 at 9:19
  • 5
    I hastily misread the question and found this answer useful. Thank you for making the same mistake I did, but now I'd like to suggest this answer be amended to include that caveat. – durette Apr 14 '16 at 20:59

You can cheat using Faux Columns Or you can use some CSS trickery

  • 1
    Note though that css trickery will get you equal height columns, but not 100% height columns. – thedz Apr 3 '09 at 6:44
  • 28
    And it reminds me what I hate about CSS :( – Aaron Digulla Apr 3 '09 at 8:43
  • If the nav bar expands to the height of the content, which determines the height of the page, it will give you 100% height. – Ryan Doherty Apr 3 '09 at 14:43
  • 1
    -1 for not providing a 100% secure way to make sure the nav bar is always high enough. – Aaron Digulla Dec 12 '11 at 9:09
  • dead link :(((( – JBis yesterday

I had a similar problem and the solution was to do this:

#cloud-container{
    position:absolute;
    top:0;
    bottom:0;
}

I wanted a page-centered div with height 100% of page height, so my total solution was:

#cloud-container{
    position:absolute;
    top:0;
    bottom:0;
    left:0;
    right:0; 
    width: XXXpx; /*otherwise div defaults to page width*/
    margin: 0 auto; /*horizontally centers div*/
}

You might need to make a parent element (or simply 'body') have position: relative;

  • 13
    Why is everyone calling it a cloud-container? – Wilf Feb 17 '14 at 7:27
  • This is a nice one! Ignoring fixing the height is a brilliant idea actually and I didn't notice any bug with it yet. Love it. KISS ! Thanks for the tip man! – daneczech May 18 '16 at 13:55
  • works in my case. thanks – lynn.fang Jun 29 '17 at 5:01

It's simple using a table:

<html>
<head><title>100% Height test</title></head>
<body>
<table style="float: left; height: 100%; width: 200px; border: 1px solid red">
<tbody><tr><td>Nav area</td></tr></tbody>
</table>
<div style="border: 1px solid green;">Content blabla...
text<br />
text<br />
text<br />
text<br />
</div>
</body>
</html>

When DIV was introduced, people were so afraid of tables that the poor DIV became the metaphorical hammer.

  • 5
    While DIVs and fluid styles are great, I think CSS still fails to capture the essence of screen layout in the same way that TABLE achieves the essence of table layout. ...And table layout is still an acceptable way to do things. – Jeff Meatball Yang Jun 20 '09 at 13:55
  • 7
    Tables are meant for tabular data, not page layout. That being said, CSS has some major shortcomings when it comes to the age-old 100% height question. I have to admit that I have used this solution when on a tight deadline, but it always felt like I was giving up. – Scott Greenfield Dec 10 '11 at 22:06
  • 5
    @Scott: I've once wasted three weeks trying to get a 100% height design right in three major browsers. I really can't hear the "tables are evil" bullshit anymore :-( Even with my knowledge, using DIVs is way too complicated. – Aaron Digulla Dec 12 '11 at 9:08
  • 1
    Proper planning ensures that no reliance on tables is necessary. Now in 2012, with the industry as a whole pushing past IE6/7, I strongly advise against using tables for 100% height! – Vael Victus Jan 27 '12 at 4:44
  • 4
    You don't have to use <table>, you could use <div style="display:table;" :D – Wilf Feb 17 '14 at 7:26

Use position absolute. Note that this isn't how we are generally used to using position absolute which requires manually laying things out or having floating dialogs. This will automatically stretch when you resize the window or the content. I believe that this requires standards mode but will work in IE6 and above.

Just replace the div with id 'thecontent' with your content (the specified height there is just for illustration, you don't have to specify a height on the actual content.

<div style="position: relative; width: 100%;">
      <div style="position: absolute; left: 0px; right: 33%; bottom: 0px; top: 0px; background-color: blue; width: 33%;" id="navbar">nav bar</div>
      <div style="position: relative; left: 33%; width: 66%; background-color: yellow;" id="content">
         <div style="height: 10000px;" id="thecontent"></div>
      </div>
</div>

The way that this works is that the outer div acts as a reference point for the nav bar. The outer div is stretched out by the content of the 'content' div. The nav bar uses absolute positioning to stretch itself out to the height of its parent. For the horizontal alignment we make the content div offset itself by the same width of the navbar.

This is made much easier with CSS3 flex box model, but that's not available in IE yet and has some of it's own quirks.

  • Hi tstanis, I tested on IE6 and the navbar didn't stretch. On FireFox, Chrome it does work greatly though. – Lucas Pottersky Aug 16 '10 at 19:18
  • On IE6, use a table or JavaScript or a browser switch unless you've done this a dozen times before. – Aaron Digulla Dec 12 '11 at 9:10

I ran into the same problem as you. I wanted to make a DIV as background, why, because its easy to manipulate div through javascript. Anyways three things I did in the css for that div.

CSS:

{    
position:absolute; 
display:block; 
height:100%; 
width:100%; 
top:0px; 
left:0px; 
z-index:-1;    
}

If you are targeting more modern browsers, life can be very simple. try:

.elem{    
    height: 100vh;
 }

if you need it at 50% of the page, replace 100 with 50.

* {
margin: 0;
}
html, body {
height: 90%;
}
.content {
min-height: 100%;
height: auto !important;
height: 100%;
margin: 0 auto ;
}

 
           document.body.onload = function () {
                var textcontrol = document.getElementById("page");
                textcontrol.style.height = (window.innerHeight) + 'px';
            }
<html>
<head><title></title></head>
<body>

<div id="page" style="background:green;">
</div>
</body>
</html>

  • please add some explanation to your answer, showing what it does and how it solves the problem – Our Man in Bananas Oct 6 '14 at 8:37
  • div "page" 100% height any platform. just copy js script in to <script></script> tag and paste in to HTML code. – reaw_ni Oct 10 '14 at 9:18

Simple, just wrap it up in a table div...

The HTML:

<div class="fake-table">
   <div class="left-side">
     some text
   </div>
   <div class="right-side">
     My Navigation or something
   </div>
</div>

The CSS:

<style>

 .fake-table{display:table;width:100%;height:100%;}
 .left-size{width:30%;height:100%;}
 .left-size{width:70%;height:100%;}

</style>

I want to cover the whole web page before prompting a modal popup. I tried many methods using CSS and Javascript but none of them help until I figure out the following solution. It works for me, I hope it helps you too.

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
	<head>
		<style>
			html, body {
			    margin: 0px 0px;
			    height 100%;
			}
          
            div.full-page {
                position: fixed;
                top: 0;
                bottom: 0;
                width: 100%;
                height: 100%;
                background-color: #000;
                opacity:0.8;
                overflow-y: hidden;
                overflow-x: hidden;
            }
          
            div.full-page div.avoid-content-highlight {
                position: relative;
                width: 100%;
                height: 100%;
            }
          
            div.modal-popup {
                position: fixed;
                top: 20%;
                bottom: 20%;
                left: 30%;
                right: 30%;
                background-color: #FFF;
                border: 1px solid #000;
            }
		</style>
		<script>
		
			// Polling for the sake of my intern tests
			var interval = setInterval(function() {
				if(document.readyState === 'complete') {
					clearInterval(interval);
					isReady();
				}    
			}, 1000);
			
			function isReady() {
				document.getElementById('btn1').disabled = false;
				document.getElementById('btn2').disabled = false;
				
				// disable scrolling
                document.getElementsByTagName('body')[0].style.overflow = 'hidden';
			}
			
			function promptModalPopup() {
                document.getElementById("div1").style.visibility = 'visible';
                document.getElementById("div2").style.visibility = 'visible';
				
				// disable scrolling
                document.getElementsByTagName('body')[0].style.overflow = 'hidden';
            }
          
            function closeModalPopup() {
                document.getElementById("div2").style.visibility = 'hidden';  
                document.getElementById("div1").style.visibility = 'hidden';
				
				// enable scrolling
                document.getElementsByTagName('body')[0].style.overflow = 'scroll';
            }
		</script>
		
	</head>
	<body id="body">
		<div id="div1" class="full-page">
			<div class="avoid-content-highlight">
                
            </div>
		</div>
        <button id="btn1" onclick="promptModalPopup()" disabled>Prompt Modal Popup</button>
		<div id="demo">
			<h2>Original content</h2>
			<h2>Original content</h2>
			<h2>Original content</h2>
			<h2>Original content</h2>
			<h2>Original content</h2>
			<h2>Original content</h2>
			<h2>Original content</h2>
			<h2>Original content</h2>
			<h2>Original content</h2>
			<h2>Original content</h2>
			<h2>Original content</h2>
			<h2>Original content</h2>
			<h2>Original content</h2>
			<h2>Original content</h2>
			<h2>Original content</h2>
			<h2>Original content</h2>
			<h2>Original content</h2>
			<h2>Original content</h2>
			<h2>Original content</h2>
			<h2>Original content</h2>
			<h2>Original content</h2>
			<h2>Original content</h2>
			<h2>Original content</h2>
		</div>
        <div id="div2" class="modal-popup">
            I am on top of all other containers
            <button id="btn2" onclick="closeModalPopup()" disabled>Close</button>
        <div>
	</body>
</html>

Good luck ;-)

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