2

In C you can use set printf's width parameter dynamically like this:

printf("%*.*f", width, precision, value);

This is how I would like it to work:

let width = 8;
let precision = 2;
let value = 1234.56789;
println!("{:*.*}", width, precision, value);

But using that syntax throws expected '}' in format string.

This kind of works:

let width = 8;
let precision = 2;
let value = 1234.56789;
println!("{:8.*}", precision, value);

But as you can see the width is not set dynamically. I assume it doesn't work because of some good reason. Is it possible to make it work in a similar way or are there any workarounds?

1 Answer 1

6

You can write:

fn main() {
    let width = 8;
    let precision = 2;
    let value = 1234.56789;
    println!("{:width$.precision$}", value);
}

This avoids mixing the actual values to be formatted with the formatting parameters, which I think is nice.

You can also write:

fn main() {
    let width = 8;
    let precision = 2;
    let value = 1234.56789;
    println!("{:1$.2$}", value, width, precision);
}

Or:

fn main() {
    let width = 8;
    let precision = 2;
    let value = 1234.56789;
    println!("{:foo$.bar$}", value, foo = width, bar = precision);
}
3
  • Although this works, I don't understand how it is possible: shouldn't macro hygiene prevent println! from accessing width and precision in the first example?
    – jthulhu
    Commented Feb 26, 2022 at 13:59
  • 2
    It isn't a macro but a compiler built-in.
    – Acorn
    Commented Feb 26, 2022 at 14:06
  • @Acorn It is a compiler built-in macro. But even not built-in proc-macros don't have hygiene (by default). Commented Feb 26, 2022 at 18:30

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