0

Hey I'm trying to differentiate between two equivalent types:

type A = {
    a: string
}

type B = {
    a: string
}

With two type predicates:

function isA(obj: any): obj is A {
    return true
}

function isB(obj: any): obj is B {
    return true
}

But I'm facing an issue where each predicate catches both types when applied to a union type.

Here is an example: Playground Link

Is this the intentional behavior? and if so, what is the use case?

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  • TypeScript's type system is structural, not nominal. However there are some ways to mimic it.
    – mochaccino
    Commented Feb 28, 2022 at 14:58

2 Answers 2

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Typescript has a structural type system. Two types with the same structure are equivalent. So your A and B types are essentially equivalent

When you have a type guard, the type in the is clause of the guard just is just the base type of what can be guarded. Subtypes can also be guarded out of a union. This means the type in the is clause, is not the final type of that might show up but rather the type that each constituent of the union is tested against.

type A = {
    a: string
}

type B = {
    a: string
    b: string
}

function isA(obj: any): obj is A {
    return true
}

const testObj2: number | B = {a: '', b: ''};
if (isA(testObj2)) {
    testObj2 // type: B
} else {
    testObj2 // number
}

Playground Link

So what happens in your case is that isA(o: any): o is A is guarding a variable of type A | B. What the compiler asks is:

  1. Is A from the union assignable to A from the is clause (yes)
  2. Is B from the union assignable to A from the is clause (yes)

Since the answer to both of these is yes, the type on the guarded branch is still A | B. And since we handled both cases on the true branch there is nothing left on the else branch

3
  • I see, thanks for the clarification. do you know of any workaround / trick? i would still like to do something different based based on the guard's decision.
    – CY-OD
    Commented Feb 28, 2022 at 15:21
  • @user16214132 As long as those types are identical or one is a base type of another the behavior will be the same. If you are relying on types to be different just because the name is different that is not the way TS types work, and typically is not the way JS works at runtime either. If you add something like a __type: "A" and __type: "B" props to the types it will work as expected Commented Feb 28, 2022 at 15:30
  • @user16214132 something like typescriptlang.org/play?#code/… Commented Feb 28, 2022 at 15:32
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I ended up just casting to any before the if, just like the ts playground link I have in the question. This way I have the union type outside the if and the wanted type inside the if

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