61

Requirements:

  • I need to grow an array arbitrarily large from data.
  • I can guess the size (roughly 100-200) with no guarantees that the array will fit every time
  • Once it is grown to its final size, I need to perform numeric computations on it, so I'd prefer to eventually get to a 2-D numpy array.
  • Speed is critical. As an example, for one of 300 files, the update() method is called 45 million times (takes 150s or so) and the finalize() method is called 500k times (takes total of 106s) ... taking a total of 250s or so.

Here is my code:

def __init__(self):
    self.data = []

def update(self, row):
    self.data.append(row)

def finalize(self):
    dx = np.array(self.data)

Other things I tried include the following code ... but this is waaaaay slower.

def class A:
    def __init__(self):
        self.data = np.array([])

    def update(self, row):
        np.append(self.data, row)

    def finalize(self):
        dx = np.reshape(self.data, size=(self.data.shape[0]/5, 5))

Here is a schematic of how this is called:

for i in range(500000):
    ax = A()
    for j in range(200):
         ax.update([1,2,3,4,5])
    ax.finalize()
    # some processing on ax
  • 1
    Does it need to be a numpy array before it is finished? If not, use a list of lists and then convert when you're finished. – Andrew Jaffe Aug 20 '11 at 20:11
  • 1
    @AndrewJaffe Do lists of lists match the memory efficiency of numpy? – wolfdawn Jun 16 '15 at 16:01
73

I tried a few different things, with timing.

import numpy as np
  1. The method you mention as slow: (32.094 seconds)

    class A:
    
        def __init__(self):
            self.data = np.array([])
    
        def update(self, row):
            self.data = np.append(self.data, row)
    
        def finalize(self):
            return np.reshape(self.data, newshape=(self.data.shape[0]/5, 5))
    
  2. Regular ol Python list: (0.308 seconds)

    class B:
    
        def __init__(self):
            self.data = []
    
        def update(self, row):
            for r in row:
                self.data.append(r)
    
        def finalize(self):
            return np.reshape(self.data, newshape=(len(self.data)/5, 5))
    
  3. Trying to implement an arraylist in numpy: (0.362 seconds)

    class C:
    
        def __init__(self):
            self.data = np.zeros((100,))
            self.capacity = 100
            self.size = 0
    
        def update(self, row):
            for r in row:
                self.add(r)
    
        def add(self, x):
            if self.size == self.capacity:
                self.capacity *= 4
                newdata = np.zeros((self.capacity,))
                newdata[:self.size] = self.data
                self.data = newdata
    
            self.data[self.size] = x
            self.size += 1
    
        def finalize(self):
            data = self.data[:self.size]
            return np.reshape(data, newshape=(len(data)/5, 5))
    

And this is how I timed it:

x = C()
for i in xrange(100000):
    x.update([i])

So it looks like regular old Python lists are pretty good ;)

  • 1
    I think the comparison is clearer with 60M updates and 500K finalizes calls. It looks like you've not called finalize in this example. – fodon Aug 20 '11 at 23:29
  • 1
    @fodon I actually did call finalize -- once per run (so I guess not really much of an impact). But this makes me think maybe I misunderstood how your data is growing: if you get 60M in on an update, I was thinking this would provide at least 60M data for the next finalize? – Owen Aug 20 '11 at 23:32
  • @Owen 60M and 500K mean 60 million and 500 thousand calls to update and finalize respectively. See my revised timing which tests a 100:1 ratio of update to finalize – Prashant Kumar Aug 21 '11 at 3:37
  • I've updated the question with a short script (that may not be syntactically correct) to give an idea of how this works. – fodon Aug 22 '11 at 5:39
  • 2
    Note that the third option is superior when you're running out of memory. The second option requires lots of memory. The reason is that Python's lists are arrays of references to values, whereas NumPy's arrays are actual arrays of values. – Fabianius Jul 18 '16 at 12:50
17

np.append() copy all the data in the array every time, but list grow the capacity by a factor (1.125). list is fast, but memory usage is larger than array. You can use array module of the python standard library if you care about the memory.

Here is a discussion about this topic:

How to create a dynamic array

  • 1
    is there a way to change the factor by which the list grows? – fodon Aug 21 '11 at 0:53
  • np.append() consuming time exponentially increase with the elements' number. – Clock ZHONG May 4 '17 at 9:38
  • ^ linear (i.e. total accumulated time is quadric), not exponential. – user1111929 Mar 18 at 23:57
11

Using the class declarations in Owen's post, here is a revised timing with some effect of the finalize.

In short, I find class C to provide an implementation that is over 60x faster than the method in the original post. (apologies for the wall of text)

The file I used:

#!/usr/bin/python
import cProfile
import numpy as np

# ... class declarations here ...

def test_class(f):
    x = f()
    for i in xrange(100000):
        x.update([i])
    for i in xrange(1000):
        x.finalize()

for x in 'ABC':
    cProfile.run('test_class(%s)' % x)

Now, the resulting timings:

     903005 function calls in 16.049 seconds

Ordered by: standard name

ncalls  tottime  percall  cumtime  percall filename:lineno(function)
     1    0.000    0.000   16.049   16.049 <string>:1(<module>)
100000    0.139    0.000    1.888    0.000 fromnumeric.py:1043(ravel)
  1000    0.001    0.000    0.003    0.000 fromnumeric.py:107(reshape)
100000    0.322    0.000   14.424    0.000 function_base.py:3466(append)
100000    0.102    0.000    1.623    0.000 numeric.py:216(asarray)
100000    0.121    0.000    0.298    0.000 numeric.py:286(asanyarray)
  1000    0.002    0.000    0.004    0.000 test.py:12(finalize)
     1    0.146    0.146   16.049   16.049 test.py:50(test_class)
     1    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 test.py:6(__init__)
100000    1.475    0.000   15.899    0.000 test.py:9(update)
     1    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 {method 'disable' of '_lsprof.Profiler' objects}
100000    0.126    0.000    0.126    0.000 {method 'ravel' of 'numpy.ndarray' objects}
  1000    0.002    0.000    0.002    0.000 {method 'reshape' of 'numpy.ndarray' objects}
200001    1.698    0.000    1.698    0.000 {numpy.core.multiarray.array}
100000   11.915    0.000   11.915    0.000 {numpy.core.multiarray.concatenate}


     208004 function calls in 16.885 seconds

Ordered by: standard name

ncalls  tottime  percall  cumtime  percall filename:lineno(function)
     1    0.001    0.001   16.885   16.885 <string>:1(<module>)
  1000    0.025    0.000   16.508    0.017 fromnumeric.py:107(reshape)
  1000    0.013    0.000   16.483    0.016 fromnumeric.py:32(_wrapit)
  1000    0.007    0.000   16.445    0.016 numeric.py:216(asarray)
     1    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 test.py:16(__init__)
100000    0.068    0.000    0.080    0.000 test.py:19(update)
  1000    0.012    0.000   16.520    0.017 test.py:23(finalize)
     1    0.284    0.284   16.883   16.883 test.py:50(test_class)
  1000    0.005    0.000    0.005    0.000 {getattr}
  1000    0.001    0.000    0.001    0.000 {len}
100000    0.012    0.000    0.012    0.000 {method 'append' of 'list' objects}
     1    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 {method 'disable' of '_lsprof.Profiler' objects}
  1000    0.020    0.000    0.020    0.000 {method 'reshape' of 'numpy.ndarray' objects}
  1000   16.438    0.016   16.438    0.016 {numpy.core.multiarray.array}


     204010 function calls in 0.244 seconds

Ordered by: standard name

ncalls  tottime  percall  cumtime  percall filename:lineno(function)
     1    0.000    0.000    0.244    0.244 <string>:1(<module>)
  1000    0.001    0.000    0.003    0.000 fromnumeric.py:107(reshape)
     1    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 test.py:27(__init__)
100000    0.082    0.000    0.170    0.000 test.py:32(update)
100000    0.087    0.000    0.088    0.000 test.py:36(add)
  1000    0.002    0.000    0.005    0.000 test.py:46(finalize)
     1    0.068    0.068    0.243    0.243 test.py:50(test_class)
  1000    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 {len}
     1    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 {method 'disable' of '_lsprof.Profiler' objects}
  1000    0.002    0.000    0.002    0.000 {method 'reshape' of 'numpy.ndarray' objects}
     6    0.001    0.000    0.001    0.000 {numpy.core.multiarray.zeros}

Class A is destroyed by the updates, class B is destroyed by the finalizes. Class C is robust in the face of both of them.

  • The update is done a n times then finalize is called once. This whole process is done m times (otherwise there is no data to finalize). Also, when comparing with original post ... do you mean the first (array.append + numpy conversion) or (numpy.append + reshape)? – fodon Aug 21 '11 at 14:27
  • what did you use for the profiling? – pyCthon Jul 8 '12 at 22:24
  • cProfile. It's the first import and the last line invoked in my code snippet. – Prashant Kumar Jul 12 '12 at 5:47
2

there is a big performance difference in the function that you use for finalization. Consider the following code:

N=100000
nruns=5

a=[]
for i in range(N):
    a.append(np.zeros(1000))

print "start"

b=[]
for i in range(nruns):
    s=time()
    c=np.vstack(a)
    b.append((time()-s))
print "Timing version vstack ",np.mean(b)

b=[]
for i in range(nruns):
    s=time()
    c1=np.reshape(a,(N,1000))
    b.append((time()-s))

print "Timing version reshape ",np.mean(b)

b=[]
for i in range(nruns):
    s=time()
    c2=np.concatenate(a,axis=0).reshape(-1,1000)
    b.append((time()-s))

print "Timing version concatenate ",np.mean(b)

print c.shape,c2.shape
assert (c==c2).all()
assert (c==c1).all()

Using concatenate seems to be twice as fast as the first version and more than 10 times faster than the second version.

Timing version vstack  1.5774928093
Timing version reshape  9.67419199944
Timing version concatenate  0.669512557983
1

If you want improve performance with list operations, have a look to blist library. It is a optimized implementation of python list and other structures.

I didn't benchmark it yet but the results in their page seem promising.

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