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I intend to use a hybrid user-item collaborative filtering to build a Top-N recommender system with TensorFlow Keras

currently my dataframe consist of |user_id|article_id|purchase

user article purchases

purchase is always TRUE because the dataset is a history of user - article purchases

This dataset has 800,000 rows and 3 columns

2 Questions

  1. How do I process it such that I will have 20% purchase = true and 80% purchase = false to train the model?

  2. Is a 20%, 80% true:false ratio good for this use case?

1 Answer 1

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  1. How do I process it such that I will have 20% purchase = true and 80% purchase = false to train the model?

Since you only have True values, it means that you'll have to generate the False values. The only False that you know of are the user-item interactions that are not present in your table. If your known interactions can be represented as a sparse matrix (meaning, a low percentage of the possible interactions, N_ITEMS x N_USER, is present) then you can do this:

  1. Generate a random user-item combination
  2. If the user-item interaction exists, means is True, then repeat step 1.
  3. If the user-item interaction does not exist, you can consider it a False interaction.

Now, to complete your 20%/80% part, just define the size N of the sample that you'll take from your ground truth data (True values) and take 4*N False values using the previous steps. Remember to keep some ground truth values for your test and evaluation steps.

  1. Is a 20%, 80% true:false ratio good for this use case?

In this case, since you only have True values in your ground truth dataset, I think the best you can do is to try out different ratios. Your real world data only contains True values, but you could also generate all of the False values. The important part to consider is that some of the values that you'll consider False while training might actually be True values in your test and validation data. Just don't use all of your ground truth data, and don't generate an important portion of the possible combinations.

I think a good start could be 50/50, then try 60/40 and so on. Evaluate using multiple metrics, see how are they changing according to the proportion of True/False values (some proportions might be better to reach higher true positive rates, other will perform worse, etc). In the end, you'll have to select one model and one training procedure according to the metrics that matter the most to you.

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