I was designing a web app and then stopped to think about how my api should be designed as a RESTful web service. For now, most of my URI's are generic and might apply to various web apps:

GET  /logout   // destroys session and redirects to /
GET  /login    // gets the webpage that has the login form
POST /login    // authenticates credentials against database and either redirects home with a new session or redirects back to /login
GET  /register // gets the webpage that has the registration form
POST /register // records the entered information into database as a new /user/xxx
GET  /user/xxx // gets and renders current user data in a profile view
POST /user/xxx // updates new information about user

I have a feeling I'm doing a lot wrong here after poking around on SO and google.

Starting with /logout, perhaps since I don't really GET anything - it may be more appropriate to POST a request to /logout, destroy the session, and then GET the redirect. And should the /logout term stay?

What about /login and /register. I could change /register to /registration but that doesn't alter how my service fundamentally works - if it has deeper issues.

I notice now that I never expose a /user resource. Perhaps that could be utilized somehow. For instance, take the user myUser:

foo.com/user/myUser

or

foo.com/user

The end user doesn't require that extra verbosity in the URI. However, which one is more appealing visually?

I noticed some other questions here on SO about this REST business, but I would really appreciate some guidance on what I've laid out here if possible.

Thanks!

UPDATE:

I would also like some opinions on:

/user/1

vs

/user/myUserName
up vote 51 down vote accepted
+150

One thing sticks out in particular as not REST-ful: the use of a GET request for logging out.

(from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hypertext_Transfer_Protocol#Safe_methods)

Some methods (for example, HEAD, GET, OPTIONS and TRACE) are defined as safe, which means they are intended only for information retrieval and should not change the state of the server. In other words, they should not have side effects, beyond relatively harmless effects such as logging, caching, the serving of banner advertisements or incrementing a web counter. [...]

[... H]andling [of GET requests] by the server is not technically limited in any way. Therefore, careless or deliberate programming can cause non-trivial changes on the server. This is discouraged, because it can cause problems for Web caching, search engines and other automated agents [...]

As for logging out and redirecting, you could have a post to your logout URI give a 303 response redirecting to the post-logout page.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Post/Redirect/Get

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HTTP_303

Edit to address URL design concerns:

"How do I design my resources?" is an important question to me; "how do I design my URLs?" is a consideration in two areas:

URLs that users will see should not be too ugly and meaningful if possible; if you want cookies to be sent in requests to some resource but not others, you'll want to structure your paths and cookie paths.

If JRandomUser wants to look at his own profile and you want the URL to be prettier than foo.com/user/JRandomUser or foo.com/user/(JRandom's numeric user id here), you could make a separate URL just for a user to look at their own information:

GET foo.com/profile /*examines cookies to figure out who 
                     * is logged in (SomeUser) and then 
                     * displays the same response as a
                     * GET to foo.com/users/SomeUser.
                     */

I would claim ignorance much more readily than wisdom on this subject, but here are a few resource design considerations:

  1. Consumer: which resources are meant to be viewed directly in a browser, loaded via XHR, or accessed by some other kind of client?
  2. Access / identity: does the response depend on cookies or referrers?
  • 1
    Great answer, thanks! If I was going to implement your separate URL suggestion (GET foo.com/profile/) would that be part of, as momo suggested, the presentation layer? In other words, what exactly should that GET request return? A web page or some JSON? – Qcom Sep 4 '11 at 4:19
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    Ah, I think I see now. Momo's answer really cleared things up. So a RESTful API is constructed to allow multiple platforms to GET, POST, PUT, and DELETE resources. A website is just another platform accessing the API. In other words, website URL design is completely different than RESTful API design. Please tell me if I'm still wrong haha. – Qcom Sep 4 '11 at 4:31
  • Yes, make your REST API one set of URLs and your website a different set. Then your website URL should give you back appropriate HTML+Javascript so that the page will make appropriate XmlHttpRequests to your API URLs to act as a client. – ellisbben Sep 8 '11 at 21:06

RESTful can be used as a guideline for constructing URLs, and you can make sessions and users resources:

  • GET /session/new gets the webpage that has the login form
  • POST /session authenticates credentials against database
  • DELETE /session destroys session and redirect to /
  • GET /users/new gets the webpage that has the registration form
  • POST /users records the entered information into database as a new /user/xxx
  • GET /users/xxx // gets and renders current user data in a profile view
  • POST /users/xxx // updates new information about user

These can be plural or singular (I'm not sure which one is correct). I've usually used /users for a user index page (as expected), and /sessions to see who is logged in (as expected).

Using the name in the URL instead of a number (/users/43 vs. /users/joe) is usually driven by the desire to be more friendly to the users or search engines, not any technical requirements. Either is fine, but I'd recommend you are consistent.

I think if you go with the register/login/logout or sign(in|up|out), it doesn't work as well with the restful terminology.

  • 4
    Awesome! I like how you noun'ed those resources; that's pretty clean. Although, from what I've heard, isn't appending /new to GET /session/ non RESTful? I've heard that the verbs are typically left to the HTTP verbs (GET, POST, etc). – Qcom Sep 4 '11 at 4:22
  • 1
    @Zach new is not a verb. In this case it's a subresource of session. – Kugel Apr 19 '13 at 4:18
  • How to determine which session to delete in DELETE /session? Curl doesn't send neither cookies nor any params in DELETE request. I assume - just to use DELETE /session/sessionId? Another question is how to return session id in POST /session and in which format. – Tvaroh Nov 3 '13 at 15:03
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    Restful indeed is a way to make yourself unhappy and waste time on things that don't matter at all. – Jian Chen Dec 10 '15 at 4:11
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    Personally I don't like the idea of having the routes which return the form (/new). This breaks the separation between the view and business logic. Tha said, without the /new routes the suggested one look perfect. – Scadge May 30 '17 at 15:28

Sessions aren't RESTful

  • Yes, I know. It's being done, usually with OAuth, but really sessions aren't RESTful. You shouldn't have a /login /logout resource primarily because you shouldn't have sessions.

  • If your going to do it, make it RESTful. Resources are nouns and /login and /logout aren't nouns. I would go with /session. This make creation and deletion a more natural action.

  • POST vs. GET for sessions is easy. If you are sending user/password as variables, I would use POST because I don't want to have the password sent as part of the URI. It will show up in logs and possibly be exposed over the wire. You also run the risk of having software fail on GET args limitations.

  • I generally use Basic Auth or no Auth with REST services.

Creating users

  • It's one resource, so you shouldn't need /register.

    • POST /user - Creates a user if the requestor cannot specify the id
    • PUT /user/xxx - Create or update a user assuming you know the id beforehand
    • GET /user - lists x user ids
    • GET /user/xxx - GETs the details of the user with id xxx
    • DELETE /user/xxx - Delete the user with id xxx
  • Which kind of ID to use is a hard question. You have to think about enforcing uniqueness, about reuse of old ids that were DELETEd. For example, you do not want to use those ids as foreign keys on a backend if ids are going to be recycled (if at all possible). You can have a lookup though for external/internal id conversion in order to mitigate backend requirements.

  • 4
    This is the best answer. /login and /logout aren't resources and break the idea of REST. – williamle8300 Sep 16 '16 at 2:07
  • "Sessions aren't RESTful therefore don't use authentication". Okaay... – RecursiveExceptionException Sep 30 '17 at 21:53
  • 2
    Authentication != Session – dietbuddha Oct 13 '17 at 0:01
  • 1
    Yes, Fielding's thesis states in section 5.1.3 that "[s]ession state is [...] kept entirely on the client." Further, I would argue that, ideally, authentication should also be stateless on the server side, i.e., rather than storing active "authentication tickets" in a database, the server should be able to verify an authentication credential just based on the credential itself, e.g. by using a self-contained cryptographic token in conjunction with a private key. So, instead of a /session resource one could introduce an /authentication resource, but it doesn't really solve the problem either... – user1932890 Feb 3 at 2:02

I am going to simply speak from my experience integrating various REST Web Services for my clients, whether it is used for mobile apps or for server to server communication as well as building REST API for others. Here are few observations that I have gathered from other people's REST API as well as those that we built ourselves:

  • When we say API, it normally refers to set of programming interface and not necessary the presentation layer. REST is also data centric and not presentation driven. That said most REST return data in the form of JSON or XML and rarely returning a specific presentation layer. This trait (of returning data and not the direct webpage) given REST ability to do multi-channels delivery. Meaning that the same webservice can be rendered in HTML, iOS, Android or even used as server to server combination.
  • It's very rare to combine both HTML and REST as a URL. By default REST are thoughts as services and not having presentation layer. It is the job for those who consume the webservices to render the data from the services that they call according to what they want. To that point your URL below does not conform with most REST based design that I've encountered thus far (nor the standards such as those who are coming from Facebook or Twitter)
GET  /register // gets the webpage that has the registration form
  • Continuing from previous point, it is also uncommon (and I have not encountered) for REST based service to do redirection such as the ones suggested below:
GET  /logout   // destroys session and redirects to /
POST /login    // authenticates credentials against database and either redirects home with a new session or redirects back to /login
 

As REST are designed as services, function such as login and logout are normally returning success/failure result (normally in JSON or XML data format) which then the consumer would interpret. Such interpretation could include the redirection to appropriate webpage as you mentioned

  • In REST, the URL signify the actions that is taken. For that reason, we should remove as much ambiguity as possible. While it is legitimate in your case to have both GET and POST that has the same path (such as /register) that perform different action, such design introduce ambiguity in services provided and may confuse the consumer of your services. For example, the URLs such as the one that you introduce below are not ideal for REST based services
GET  /register // gets the webpage that has the registration form
POST /register // records the entered information into database as a new /user/xxx

Those are some points from what I have dealt with. I hope it could provide some insights for you.

Now as far for implementation of your REST, these are the typical implementation that I have encountered:

  • GET  /logout  
    

    Execute logout in the backend and return JSON for denoting the success/failure of the operation

  • POST /login
    

    Submit credentials to the backend. Return success/failure. If successful, normally it will also return the session token as well as the profile information.

  • POST /register
    

    Submit registration to the backend. Return success/failure. If successful, normally treated the same as successful login or you could choose to make registration as a distinct service

  • GET  /user/xxx
    

    Get user profile and return JSON data format for the user's profile

  • POST /user/xxx 
    // renamed to 
    POST /updateUser/xxx
    

    Post updated profile information as JSON format and update the information in the backend. Return success/failure to the caller

  • 3
    Yes, if you are integrating your REST API with HTML based app (via Javascript and AJAX), you will tremendous benefits as JSON is parsed natively by Javascript. In Android/Java, JSON is easier and more straightforward to parse as well compared to XML. – momo Aug 31 '11 at 7:44
  • 6
    GET /logout is dangerous. GET should be idempotent. Also browsers like to prefetch <a> hrefs, which will log you out! – Kugel Apr 19 '13 at 4:21

Using and designing APIs isn't all about visually appealing URLs, but URLs that make sense. For user registration/login, I've used these in the past:

GET  /user          // Get multiple user info (limit ~10)
GET  /user/1        // Get single user info
POST /user          // Create user (registration)
PUT  /user/1        // Edit user
POST /user/1/login  // Login (could be GET, but I like sending more secure params by POST)
GET  /user/1/logout // Logout
  • 4
    Use HTTPS if you want security, OK? – Donal Fellows Aug 30 '11 at 14:39
  • 9
    My point was that POST is no more secure than GET (except for information written to log files, but they should only be read by highly trusted people). The real security comes from securing the channel with SSL (i.e., using HTTPS); the reason to use POST instead of PUT is to do with operation idempotency. (OTOH, I've never seen login sessions managed with REST; they usually seem to be set up before getting to the RESTful part of the site.) – Donal Fellows Aug 31 '11 at 8:02
  • 16
    You already know your user ID when you are logging in? – Jean-François Beauchef Oct 31 '16 at 15:47
  • 2
    "POST is no more secure than GET" I disagree. Imagine the ability of modifying a user by clicking in a link (GET) – jperelli Feb 21 '17 at 0:18

I would recommend using a user account URL similar to twitter where the user's account URL would be something like foo.com/myUserName just like you can get to my twitter account with the URL https://twitter.com/joelbyler

I disagree about logout requiring a POST. As part of your API, if you are going to maintain a session, then a session id in the form of a UUID might be something that can be used to keep track of a user and confirm that the action being taken is authorized. Then even a GET can pass along the session id to the resource.

In short I would recommend that you keep it simple, URLs should be short an memorable.

I believe this is a RESTful approach to authentication. For LogIn you use HttpPut. This HTTP method can be used for creation when the key is provided, and repeated calls are idempotent. For LogOff, you specify the same path under the HttpDelete method. No verbs utilized. Proper collection pluralization. The HTTP methods support the purpose.

[HttpPut]
[Route("sessions/current")]
public IActionResult LogIn(LogInModel model) { ... }

[HttpDelete]
[Route("sessions/current")]
public IActionResult LogOff() { ... }

If desired you could substitute current for active.

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