39

Fiddle

var Assertion = function() {
    return { "dummy": "data" };    
}

Object.defineProperty(Object.prototype, 'should', {
  set: function(){},
  get: function(){
    return new Assertion(this);
  }
});

// Insert magic here.

// This needs to be false
console.log(({}).should === undefined);

What options do I have in ES5 to undo a defineProperty call ?

No silly suggestions like Object.defineProperty = function() { } please.

The following Object.defineProperty(Object.prototype, 'should', {})

does not work

and Object.defineProperty(Object.prototype, 'should', { value: undefined })

Throws a Uncaught TypeError: Cannot redefine property: defineProperty in V8

Object.defineProperty(Object.prototype, 'should', { 
    set: function() {},
    get: function() { return undefined; }
});

Throws the same error

delete Object.prototype.should also does not work

0
42

In general, you can't undo a defineProperty call, since there's no undo stack or something. The JS engine does not keep track of previous attribute descriptors.

For example,

Object.defineProperty(Object.prototype, 'foo', {
    configurable: true,
    value: 1,
    enumerable: false
});
Object.defineProperty(Object.prototype, 'foo', {
    get: function () {
        alert('You cannot revert me');
        return 2;
    },
    enumerable: true
});

What you can do is remove or reconfigure an attribute, or overwrite its value. As mentioned in the other answer, the configurable flag is required to be true if you want to remove or reconfigure. Once a property is defined with configurable:false, you cannot change the configurable flag.


To remove an attribute (this is supposedly what you want to do), use delete:

Object.defineProperty(Object.prototype, 'foo', {
    configurable: true, // defaults to false
    writable: false,
    value: 1
});
delete Object.prototype.foo;
console.log(Object.prototype.hasOwnProperty('foo')); // false

To reconfigure, use defineProperty again and pass a different descriptor:

Object.defineProperty(Object.prototype, 'foo', {
    configurable: true,
    get: ...
    set: ...
});
Object.defineProperty(Object.prototype, 'foo', {
    value: undefined
});
console.log({}.foo); // undefined
console.log(Object.prototype.hasOwnProperty('foo')); // true

As shown in this sample, you can use defineProperty to switch between accessor (get/set) and data (value) properties.


To overwrite, use simple assignment. In this case, you need the writable flag to be true. Obviously this does not work with accessor properties. It even throws an exception:

Object.defineProperty(Object.prototype, 'foo', {
    configurable: true,
    value: 1,
    writable: true // defaults to false
});
Object.prototype.foo = undefined;
console.log(Object.prototype.foo); // undefined
console.log(Object.prototype.hasOwnProperty('foo')); // true

Object.defineProperty(Object.prototype, 'foo', {
    get: function () {
        return 1;
    },
    writable: true // JS error!
});

Note that writable defaults to false when you use defineProperty, but true when you use the simple syntax o.attr = val; to define a (previously not existing) property.

2
  • can anybody explain why can't we override or remove an accessor by assigning a new value to the property like this obj.foo = 'new value';? in other word why we have to either delete the property first or reconfigure it to get rid of that accessor – kapreski Oct 13 '17 at 7:49
  • 1
    @kapreski Because JavaScript accessor properties do not work in a way that allows reassignment of the property itself: when you attempt to assign a value to an accessor, a correctly programmed JavaScript engine will "trap" the call and pass the assigned value to the accessor's setter function if one has been defined, else it assume the property is not supposed to be written to at all and will throw an error, as according to the ECMAScript specification. Defining a property as an accessor at all will remove the default [[Get]] and [[Set]] behaviour in favour of user-provided behaviour. – Jamie Ridding Oct 13 '18 at 0:52

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