3

I am using next.js for my web app. I use WebGL to render a 2d scene. I have a fragment and a vertex shader hardcoded as strings in my javascript:

var fragmentShaderSource = [
    `  #ifdef GL_ES`,
    `precision highp float;`,
    `  #endif`,
    ``,
    `uniform vec4 uGlobalColor;`,
    ``,
    `void main() {`,
    `  gl_FragColor = uGlobalColor;`,
    `}`,
].join("\n");

...

let shader = gl.createShader(type);

gl.shaderSource(shader, fragmentShaderSource);
gl.compileShader(shader);

This sucks and I would prefer to use separated fragment.glsl and vertex.glsl files to dev (even if the compiled version gets a hardcoded string at the end). I read things about webpack but it's my first time using next/webpack and I'm not sure to understand what to do (and examples are 6 years old or more).

2
  • What is the actual error you get - Do you get something about using a loader?
    – Ramakay
    Mar 11, 2022 at 17:13
  • Why not put them in your public folder and load them as needed?
    – mochaccino
    Mar 11, 2022 at 17:38

1 Answer 1

6

Here is a solution using raw loader. This is my next.config.js:

/** @type {import('next').NextConfig} */
const nextConfig = {
  reactStrictMode: true,
  webpack: (config, options) => {
    config.module.rules.push({
      test: /\.glsl/,
      type: "asset/source",
    })
    return config
  },
}

module.exports = nextConfig

I can now import my shaders code that way:

import fragmentShader from '../../shaders/fragment.glsl'
import vertexShader from '../../shaders/vertex.glsl'

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