21

Editor's note: as of Rust 1.66.0, BTreeMap::pop_last has been stabilized.


In stable Rust 1.65 or older, is there a way to write a function equivalent to BTreeMap::pop_last?

The best I could come up with is:

fn map_pop_last<K, V>(m: &mut BTreeMap<K, V>) -> Option<(K, V)>
where
    K: Ord + Clone,
{
    let last = m.iter().next_back();
    if let Some((k, _)) = last {
        let k_copy = k.clone();
        return m.remove_entry(&k_copy);
    }
    None
}

It works, but it requires that the key is cloneable. BTreeMap::pop_last from Rust nightly imposes no such constraint.

If I remove the cloning like this

fn map_pop_last<K, V>(m: &mut BTreeMap<K, V>) -> Option<(K, V)>
where
    K: Ord,
{
    let last = m.iter().next_back();
    if let Some((k, _)) = last {
        return m.remove_entry(k);
    }
    None
}

it leads to

error[E0502]: cannot borrow `*m` as mutable because it is also borrowed as immutable
  --> ...
   |
.. |     let last = m.iter().next_back();
   |                -------- immutable borrow occurs here
.. |     if let Some((k, _)) = last {
.. |         return m.remove_entry(k);
   |                ^^------------^^^
   |                | |
   |                | immutable borrow later used by call
   |                mutable borrow occurs here

Is there a way to work around this issue without imposing additional constraints on map key and value types?

7
  • I don't think it is possible to implement this in safe Rust. You could perhaps copy chunks of the source code from std, to get the same implementation.
    – Peter Hall
    Mar 13, 2022 at 13:56
  • 2
    @PeterHall Unfortunately the source code uses alloc::collections::btree::borrow::DormantMutRef which is not accessible through the public API. You would need to either re-implement it or find another way. Mar 13, 2022 at 15:13
  • And as more general point, copying parts of unstable source code is not safer than compiling on nightly, probably less. Mar 13, 2022 at 15:15
  • @Anonyme2000 copying specific parts of unstable source is definitely safer than just using nightly.
    – Peter Hall
    Mar 13, 2022 at 16:11
  • @Anonyme2000 Yes, you would need to copy all of the internal types that it uses, not just the function body.
    – Peter Hall
    Mar 13, 2022 at 16:12

3 Answers 3

11

Is there a way to work around this issue without imposing additional constraints on map key and value types?

It doesn't appear doable in safe Rust, at least not with reasonable algorithmic complexity. (See Aiden4's answer for a solution that does it by re-building the whole map.)

But if you're allowed to use unsafe, and if you're determined enough that you want to delve into it, this code could do it:

// Safety: if key uses shared interior mutability, the comparison function
// must not use it. (E.g. it is not allowed to call borrow_mut() on a
// Rc<RefCell<X>> inside the key). It is extremely unlikely that such a
// key exists, but it's possible to write it, so this must be marked unsafe.
unsafe fn map_pop_last<K, V>(m: &mut BTreeMap<K, V>) -> Option<(K, V)>
where
    K: Ord,
{
    // We make a shallow copy of the key in the map, and pass a
    // reference to the copy to BTreeMap::remove_entry(). Since
    // remove_entry() is not dropping the key/value pair (it's returning
    // it), our shallow copy will remain throughout the lifetime of
    // remove_entry(), even if the key contains references.
    let (last_key_ref, _) = m.iter().next_back()?;
    let last_key_copy = ManuallyDrop::new(std::ptr::read(last_key_ref));
    m.remove_entry(&last_key_copy)
}

Playground

9
  • Note that even though remove_entry is not dropping the key it may move it internally prior to returning it, which would invalidate the reference before it returns (although it likely won't try to use the reference again by that point explaining why MIRI doesn't complain).
    – Jmb
    Mar 14, 2022 at 8:07
  • @Jmb No. It won't invalidate the reference because the reference points to a local copy of the key. The validity my comment refers to is in case the key internally contains further references, which would be invalidated by it getting dropped. (But won't, because it's getting moved to the caller.) Mar 14, 2022 at 8:09
  • Oh, right. So it should be safe unless the key is of some exotic type that does something funny (and unsafe) in its comparison function.
    – Jmb
    Mar 14, 2022 at 8:22
  • 1
    @Jmb I think I've now come up with an example where safe code results in unsoundness (when calling my function): play.rust-lang.org/… The trick is to replace Box<RefCell<i32>> with RefCell<Box<i32>>. Then borrow_mut() on self.r and other.r are decoupled and don't panic, and their .as_mut() give out two mutable refs to the same i32, which is UB. Mar 14, 2022 at 13:49
  • 1
    And with a slight modification we can get miri to complain: play.rust-lang.org/…
    – Jmb
    Mar 15, 2022 at 7:27
5

Is there a way to work around this issue without imposing additional constraints on map key and value types?

You can't do it efficiently in safe rust, but it is possible:

fn map_pop_last<K, V>(m: &mut BTreeMap<K, V>) -> Option<(K, V)>
where
    K: Ord,
{
    let mut temp = BTreeMap::new();
    std::mem::swap(m, &mut temp);
    let mut iter = temp.into_iter();
    let ret = iter.next_back();
    m.extend(iter);
    ret  
}

playground

This will do a full traversal of the map but is safe.

2

We can even be sure that it is not possible to mutate the map in-place with the current offer of interfaces in safe Rust (version 1.59, at the time of writing):

To extract the key, we need to look the keys of the map. "Look at" implies borrowing here. This gives us a &K reference that also borrows the entire map.

Now, a problem arises: To call any of these remove* methods, we need to mutably borrow the map again, which we cannot do since we still hold the reference to the key that we are about to extract - these lifetimes overlap and it won't compile.

Another approach could be to try to get hold of the Entry, but to get one through the .entry method, we need have an owned K too.

0

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