112

One of the things that used to perplex me as a newby to R was how to format a number as a percentage for printing.

For example, display 0.12345 as 12.345%. I have a number of workarounds for this, but none of these seem to be "newby friendly". For example:

set.seed(1)
m <- runif(5)

paste(round(100*m, 2), "%", sep="")
[1] "26.55%" "37.21%" "57.29%" "90.82%" "20.17%"

sprintf("%1.2f%%", 100*m)
[1] "26.55%" "37.21%" "57.29%" "90.82%" "20.17%"

Question: Is there a base R function to do this? Alternatively, is there a widely used package that provides a convenient wrapper?


Despite searching for something like this in ?format, ?formatC and ?prettyNum, I have yet to find a suitably convenient wrapper in base R. ??"percent" didn't yield anything useful. library(sos); findFn("format percent") returns 1250 hits - so again not useful. ggplot2 has a function percent but this gives no control over rounding accuracy.

  • 4
    sprintf seems to be the favorite solution on the mailing lists, and I've not seen any better solution. Any built-in function won't be much simpler to call anyway, right? – michel-slm Aug 22 '11 at 10:10
  • 1
    In my view sprintf is perfectly fine for that subset of R coders that also happen to be programmers. I have coded a lot in my life, including COBOL (shudder) and fortran (shows my age). But I don't consider the sprintf formatting rules obvious (translation: WTF?). And of course a dedicated wrapper must be easier to call than sprintf, for example: format_percent(x=0.12345, digits=2) – Andrie Aug 22 '11 at 10:13
  • @hircus I think it's common enough that it deserves its own short curried function. It's particularly an issue with Sweave, where \Sexpr{sprintf(%1.2f%%",myvar)} is much uglier than \Sexpr{pct(myvar)} or whatever the shorter function would be. – Ari B. Friedman Aug 22 '11 at 10:18
  • 2
    Isn't learning to use the appropriate tools something we should expect users to strive towards? I mean, learning to use sprintf() is hardly more time consuming than finding out that package foo contains format_percent(). What happens if the user then doesn't want to format as percent but something else that is similar? They need to find another wrapper. In the long run learning the base tools will be beneficial. – Gavin Simpson Aug 22 '11 at 11:21
  • 1
    There is a slight problem in that % is the comment character in LaTeX, which is the "default" reporting format for R. So while it may be useful for labelling graphs, care must be taking if the formatted number is to be Sweaved. – James Aug 22 '11 at 11:26
106

An update, several years later:

These days there is a percent function in the scales package, as documented in krlmlr's answer. Use that instead of my hand-rolled solution.


Try something like

percent <- function(x, digits = 2, format = "f", ...) {
  paste0(formatC(100 * x, format = format, digits = digits, ...), "%")
}

With usage, e.g.,

x <- c(-1, 0, 0.1, 0.555555, 1, 100)
percent(x)

(If you prefer, change the format from "f" to "g".)

  • 1
    Yes, this works, and is a slightly more general version of the workaround I supplied in the question. But my real question is whether this exists in base R or not. – Andrie Aug 22 '11 at 10:44
  • 1
    +1 For showing how to write such a function. – Andrie Aug 22 '11 at 12:50
  • Works for me in listing percents, but replacing "x" with "percent(x)" in a statistical or graphing command produces an error message. – rolando2 Jul 20 '14 at 18:31
  • @rolando2 Both my answer and krlmlr's answer return character vectors as the output, not numbers. They are for formatting axis labels and the like. Perhaps you just want to multiply by 100? – Richie Cotton Jul 21 '14 at 12:45
66

Check out the scales package. It used to be a part of ggplot2, I think.

library('scales')
percent((1:10) / 100)
#  [1] "1%"  "2%"  "3%"  "4%"  "5%"  "6%"  "7%"  "8%"  "9%"  "10%"

The built-in logic for detecting the precision should work well enough for most cases.

percent((1:10) / 1000)
#  [1] "0.1%" "0.2%" "0.3%" "0.4%" "0.5%" "0.6%" "0.7%" "0.8%" "0.9%" "1.0%"
percent((1:10) / 100000)
#  [1] "0.001%" "0.002%" "0.003%" "0.004%" "0.005%" "0.006%" "0.007%" "0.008%"
#  [9] "0.009%" "0.010%"
percent(sqrt(seq(0, 1, by=0.1)))
#  [1] "0%"   "32%"  "45%"  "55%"  "63%"  "71%"  "77%"  "84%"  "89%"  "95%" 
# [11] "100%"
percent(seq(0, 0.1, by=0.01) ** 2)
#  [1] "0.00%" "0.01%" "0.04%" "0.09%" "0.16%" "0.25%" "0.36%" "0.49%" "0.64%"
# [10] "0.81%" "1.00%"
  • 2
    Doesn't work for negative numbers. percent(-0.1) produces NaN% – akhmed May 13 '15 at 0:19
  • 1
    @akhmed: This has been reported already, a fix is available but pending review: github.com/hadley/scales/issues/50. Note that it seems to work for more than one negative number: scales::percent(c(-0.1, -0.2)) – krlmlr May 13 '15 at 1:01
  • Thanks for the link! I wasn't sure if it is a feature or a bug. For multiple numbers it sometimes works and sometimes doesn't. Say, scales::percent(c(-0.1,-0.1,-0.1)) produces "NaN%" "NaN%" "NaN%" but your example does work. For the reference of others, the bug isn't yet fixed as of scales_0.2.4. Also, as of today, the corresponding pull request fixing it is not yet merged into the main branch. – akhmed May 13 '15 at 20:29
30

Check out the percent function from the formattable package:

library(formattable)
x <- c(0.23, 0.95, 0.3)
percent(x)
[1] 23.00% 95.00% 30.00%
  • 4
    +1, this allows for specifying how many digits to include, which scales::percent in the first two answers does not. – Sam Firke Nov 15 '16 at 18:13
  • 3
    +1, even though it's pretty easy to roll your own function, allowing choosing the number of digits is really useful. – Gang Su May 3 '18 at 16:37
9

I did some benchmarking for speed on these answers and was surprised to see percent in the scales package so touted, given its sluggishness. I imagine the advantage is its automatic detector for for proper formatting, but if you know what your data looks like it seems clear to be avoided.

Here are the results from trying to format a list of 100,000 percentages in (0,1) to a percentage in 2 digits:

library(microbenchmark)
x = runif(1e5)
microbenchmark(times = 100L, andrie1(), andrie2(), richie(), krlmlr())
# Unit: milliseconds
#   expr       min        lq      mean    median        uq       max
# 1 andrie1()  91.08811  95.51952  99.54368  97.39548 102.75665 126.54918 #paste(round())
# 2 andrie2()  43.75678  45.56284  49.20919  47.42042  51.23483  69.10444 #sprintf()
# 3  richie()  79.35606  82.30379  87.29905  84.47743  90.38425 112.22889 #paste(formatC())
# 4  krlmlr() 243.19699 267.74435 304.16202 280.28878 311.41978 534.55904 #scales::percent()

So sprintf emerges as a clear winner when we want to add a percent sign. On the other hand, if we only want to multiply the number and round (go from proportion to percent without "%", then round() is fastest:

# Unit: milliseconds
#        expr      min        lq      mean    median        uq       max
# 1 andrie1()  4.43576  4.514349  4.583014  4.547911  4.640199  4.939159 # round()
# 2 andrie2() 42.26545 42.462963 43.229595 42.960719 43.642912 47.344517 # sprintf()
# 3  richie() 64.99420 65.872592 67.480730 66.731730 67.950658 96.722691 # formatC()
6

Here's my solution for defining a new function (mostly so I can play around with Curry and Compose :-) ):

library(roxygen)
printpct <- Compose(function(x) x*100, Curry(sprintf,fmt="%1.2f%%"))
  • 1
    +1 For using Compose and Curry – Andrie Aug 22 '11 at 12:51
5

You can use the scales package just for this operation (without loading it with require or library)

scales::percent(m)
3

Seeing how scalable::percent had already been shown to be slowest and Liliana Pacheco offering up another solution, I went ahead and tried to benchmark it against some of the other options based on the example Michael set:

library(microbenchmark)
library(scales)
library(formattable)

x<-runif(1e5)

lilip <- function() formattable::percent(x,2)
krlmlr <- function() scales::percent(x)
andrie1 <- function() paste0(round(x,4) * 100, '%')

microbenchmark(times=100L,lilip(), krlmlr(), andrie1())

These are the results I got:

Unit: microseconds
      expr        min          lq        mean      median          uq        max neval
   lilip()    194.562    373.7335    772.5663    889.7045    950.4035   1611.537   100
  krlmlr() 226270.845 237985.6560 260194.9269 251581.0235 280704.2320 373022.180   100
 andrie1()  87916.021  90437.4820  92791.8923  92636.8420  94448.7040 102543.252   100

I have no idea, though, why my krlmlr() and andrie1() performed so much worse than in MichaelChirico's example. Any clues?

0
try this~

data_format <- function(data,digit=2,type='%'){
if(type=='d') {
    type = 'f';
    digit = 0;
}
switch(type,
    '%' = {format <- paste("%.", digit, "f%", type, sep='');num <- 100},
    'f' = {format <- paste("%.", digit, type, sep='');num <- 1},
    cat(type, "is not a recognized type\n")
)
sprintf(format, num * data)
}
0

This function could transform the data to percentages by columns

percent.colmns = function(base, columnas = 1:ncol(base), filas = 1:nrow(base)){
    base2 = base
    for(j in columnas){
        suma.c = sum(base[,j])
        for(i in filas){
            base2[i,j] = base[i,j]*100/suma.c
        }
    }
    return(base2)
}

protected by Andrie Jan 12 '17 at 15:27

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