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Per [intro.object]/2:

[..] An object that is not a subobject of any other object is called a complete object [..].

So consider this snippet of code:

struct Base {};
struct Derived : Base {};
struct MostDerived : Derived {};

I can't understand the wording in this quote from the standard:

[object.intro]/6:

If a complete object, a member subobject, or an array element is of class type, its type is considered the most derived class [..] An object of a most derived class type or of a non-class type is called a most derived object.

From the quote what I understand is that a type of a complete object is of "most-derived" class type. I stopped here, I really do not understand the rest of the wording.

  • Per the question "What does the "most derived object" mean?" I think that (correct me if I am wrong), objects of type "most-derived" class only, like MostDerived, are called "most-derived" objects. Is this true?

  • If I have created an object of Base like this: Base b_obj = Base(), is the object b_obj a "most-derived" object?

  • If I have created an object of Derived like this: Derived d_obj = Derived(), is the object d_obj also a "most-derived" object?

  • Does the word "derived" in "most-derived" mean that the object is an object of a class like MostDerived, or mean that the object has no class subobject in it?

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    See also this editorial issue. The terms are supposed to describe a relation between objects, but the current wording doesn't define them as such. Mar 21 at 0:28

2 Answers 2

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Per the question "What does the "most derived object" mean?" I think that (correct me if I am wrong), objects of type "most-derived" class only, like MostDerived, are called "most-derived" objects. Does this true?.

"Most derived class" is supposed to be dependent on the object under consideration. It is not a property of the class as such.

if I have created an object of Base like this: Base b_obj = Base(), Is the object b_obj is "most-derived" object?

Yes, b_obj is a variable and as such a complete object. A complete object is always a most-derived object.

if I have created an object of Derived like this: Derived d_obj = Derived(), Is the object d_obj is also a "most-derived" object?

Same as above applies.

Is the word "derived" in "most-derived" mean that the object is an object of a class like MostDerived, or mean that the object has no class subobject in it?

"most-derived" means that there is no other object of which the object under consideration is a base class subobject. This is again not a property of classes themselves, but depends on the concrete instance of the class. If for example a Derived object is created with new Derived, then it contains a Base base class subobject and this subobject is not a most-derived object. However the Derived object is the most-derived object, since there isn't e.g. any MostDerived object of which it is a base class subobject.

Is every "complete" object is "most-derived" object

Yes, every complete object is a most-derived object. But the reverse is not true. For example

struct A {
    Base b;
};

A a;

a is an object of type A and itself a most-derived object and a complete object, but a.b is also a most-derived object, although not a complete object.

2
  1. An object is not a class.
  2. An object is an instantiation of a class, an array, or built-in-type.
  3. Subobjects are class member objects, array elements, or base classes of an object.
  4. Derived objects (and most-derived objects) only make sense in the context of class inheritance.
void foo() {
    int i = 0; // complete object, but not most-derived (not class type)
}

class A {
   int i = 0; // non complete object, not most-derived
}

void bar() {
    A a; // complete object, but not derived, so can't be "most derived"
}

class B : A { }

void biz() {
   B b; // complete object, derived object, and most-derived object
}

Is every "complete" object is "most-derived" object

No. A most-derived object is an object of a most-derived class, and a most-derived class must be of a class type. Objects may be of class type, but non-class type objects also exist.

  • Every complete object of class-type is a most-derived object only if that class inherits.
  • A most-derived object may be a subobject, so you cannot infer object completeness from most-derivedness (however, you can infer that the most-derived object is of class type).

So if I have created an object of Base like this: Base b_obj = Base(), Is the object b_obj is "most-derived" object?

Yes. The most-derived object of b_obj is an object of type Base. This is not necessarily a complete object, however, since this could be a class member definition. Again, complete is not synonymous with most-derived.


Also if I have created an object of Derived like this: Derived d_obj = Derived(), Is the object d_obj is also a "most-derived" object?

Yes. The most-derived object of d_obj is an object of type Derived.


If you have an object created as type MostDerived:

MostDerived md;
  • It is an object of type MostDerived
  • It is an object of type Derived
  • It is an object of type Base
  • If it is not a member subobject, then it is a complete object
  • Its most-derived object is of type MostDerived
  • It has a subobject of type Derived, which is neither a complete object nor a most-derived object
  • Its subobject of type Derived has a subobject of type Base, which is neither a complete object nor a most-derived object.
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    Thanks, JohnFilleau. Can you add a point that states whether or not objects you have declared md and d and b are "most-derived" objects or not? That's basically what's I am asking for
    – mada
    Mar 21 at 0:04
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    "Yes. Complete object and most-derived object are synonymous.": There are most-derived objects which are not complete objects (e.g. members and array elements). "It is an object of type" sounds wrong, since it seems to refer to the variable which is one object only (with the most-derived type). Mar 21 at 0:11
  • @user17732522 I'd believe that. I'm just kind of winging it hoping someone who knows better will come and fix it. Mar 21 at 0:14
  • @JohnFilleau It seems otherwise correct to me, which is why I am only trying to correct your answer instead of posting a new one. Mar 21 at 0:15
  • If you can please answer "Is the word "derived" in "most-derived" mean that the object is an object of a most-derived class, like class MostDerived, or mean that the object has no class subobject in it?". I am actually know the answer (thanks to @user17732522), but it might be helpful for others.
    – mada
    Mar 21 at 0:19

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