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First of all, am I correct to assume that if there's always going to be a single writer thread, then I should be safe to use HashMap but not ConcurrentHashMap?

In HashMap#resize (java 17), what it does is

Node<K,V>[] oldTab = table; //table is the underlying storage transient Node<K,V>[] table
...
Node<K,V>[] newTab = (Node<K,V>[])new Node[newCap];

table = newTab;

// copy data from oldTab to newTab
...

If I have another thread starts reading while copy data from oldTab to newTab is not finished, I'll be doomed with wrong data since HashMap#get retrieves value from table, which is now an empty array because of table = newTab?

What I don't understand is why not do the copy data from oldTab to newTab step first, before replacing table with newTab (table = newTab):

Node<K,V>[] oldTab = table;
...
Node<K,V>[] newTab = (Node<K,V>[])new Node[newCap];

// copy data from oldTab to newTab
...

table = newTab;

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    HashMap is not thread-safe. Period. End-of-discussion. It is entirely possible that the current implementation is safe in this case (to be clear, I haven't verified that, and I don't think it is safe at all), but there is no guarantee that this would remain so. If writing happens on another thread than reading, then you need to use a thread-safe solution like ConcurrentHashMap or Collections.synchronizedMap, etc. Mar 21, 2022 at 12:05
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    To be clear, even if the copying is 'safe', there are all the other visibility problems with writing on another thread than reading that you're ignoring. In fact, the HashMap documentation explicitly states: "If multiple threads access a hash map concurrently, and at least one of the threads modifies the map structurally, it must be synchronized externally." Mar 21, 2022 at 12:07
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    The implications of this code have been discussed in What implementation detail makes this code fail so easily? Since the order of these statements does not really matter for concurrent access, i.e. reading it while another thread is writing to it, is broken in any case, you can see this particular order as a feature. It reduces the likelihood of broken code passing by accident, so it helps you spotting your bugs earlier.
    – Holger
    Mar 22, 2022 at 9:01

1 Answer 1

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No, this is not thread safe. As the javadoc of HashMap states:

If multiple threads access a hash map concurrently, and at least one of the threads modifies the map structurally, it must be synchronized externally. (A structural modification is any operation that adds or deletes one or more mappings; merely changing the value associated with a key that an instance already contains is not a structural modification.)

The fact that one thread is changing the map while others are reading concurrently is by definition unsafe. You will need to use ConcurrentHashMap or Collections.synchronizedMap or another synchronization solution.

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  • thanks @MarkRotteveel. I think I understand you. even if the resize is made safer, there will still be lots of visibility issue for reasons such as table is not volatile
    – wayne
    Mar 21, 2022 at 12:14
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    @wayne Even stronger than that, a resize is a structural modification of the map, so this is explicitly declared unsafe here. Mar 21, 2022 at 12:16
  • I was just about to ask this @MarkRotteveel. Does modifies the map structurally mean that if the thread is NOT doing structure change (e.g.simply replacing a value), then it's still safe to use HashMap?
    – wayne
    Mar 21, 2022 at 12:18
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    @wayne No, because that would still leave you with visibility problems (other threads might not see the updated value soon if ever). Just avoid a world of hurt trying to game it, and use ConcurrentHashMap or another thread-safe solution. Mar 21, 2022 at 12:22
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    @wayne not being structurally modified means that existing iterators (still within the same thread) do not get invalid. So you can, for example, iterate over a map and replace the existing values. In contrast, you can not add or remove entries in the middle of an iteration. This has nothing to do with multi-threading. As already said, concurrent access in the presence of modification, is broken in general.
    – Holger
    Mar 22, 2022 at 9:26

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