0

I would like to perform this in Dart:

abstract class A
{
  int f();
}

class A1 extends A
{
  @override
  int f() => 1515;
}

class A2 extends A
{
  @override
  int f() => 1789;
}

class X<T extends A> extends T
{
  int x() => f();
}

void main()
{
  X<A1> x1 = X<A1>();
  X<A2> x2 = X<A2>();
  
  print( x1.x() ); // Should print 1515;
  print( x2.x() ); // Should print 1789;
}

The critical line is the one defining template class X: the compiler complains because X is inheriting of the template argument (which extends A, so it could know that it is a class).

I may admit that I'm pushing the language a bit far (my C++ background...) but is there a way to perform this in Dart?

Addendum

I tried this:

abstract class A
{
  A();
  
  int f();
}

class A1 extends A
{
  A1();

  @override
  int f() => 1515;
}

class A2 extends A
{
  A2();

  @override
  int f()=>1789;
}

class X<T extends A> {
  late T t;
  
  X(){
    t = T();
  }
  int x() => t.f();
}

void main()
{
  X<A1> x1 = X<A1>();
  X<A2> x2 = X<A2>();
  
  print( x1.x() );
  print( x2.x() );
}

But the compiler is now complaining on the line with t = T();...

'T' isn't a function. Try correcting the name to match an existing function, or to define a method or function name 'T'.

2 Answers 2

1

Dart has generics, which are similar to but are not the same as C++ templates. C++ templates are more similar to macros where template arguments are substituted at compilation time, and it results in separate compiled versions of the template class for each combination of template arguments. Dart generics are different and instead are like Java's: there is a single compiled version of the generic class.

You therefore can't use duck-typing with T like you would with C++, and you can't invoke T constructors or static methods.

What you instead can do is to provide a callback that constructs a T, e.g.:

class X<T extends A> {
  T t;
  
  X(T Function() makeT) : t = makeT();

  int x() => t.f();
}

void main()
{
  X<A1> x1 = X(A1.new);
  X<A2> x2 = X(A2.new);

  ...
}

(I also made X.t no longer late (late is unnecessary if you initialize it via the constructor's initializer list) and removed the explicit type parameters when invoking the X constructors (they now can be inferred from the argument).)

3
  • Very interesting. Thanks for the explanation as well. However I'm hesitating between your solution and mine. They are very close: with your's the new is performed in the constructor, within the constructor, while with mine, it is performed beforehand, at the side of the constructor call. Yours is definitely more Dart-flavored (as I understand it, I'm new with Dart) but any function returning a T may be provided : it may be a bit confusing for the user of a library. With mine, this user just has to provide the instance of the service provider (A1 or A2). I need to think about it.
    – Jacques
    Mar 24, 2022 at 19:01
  • Also, with my solution there is more freedom to provide different parameters of even different types to A1 and A2, depending on the semantic of both classes. In you solution, the constructor must get the additional parameters and pass them to the created T. So unless you provide some logic to X about how to create X1 and X2 (which is bad design), parameters of A1 and A2 constructors must be similar. And even then, X should pass them to makeT etc.
    – Jacques
    Mar 24, 2022 at 19:09
  • @Jacques Use whichever approach you think is best for you. I'm not advocating for any particular approach (you certainly understand your use case better than I do). I'm just explaining why T() doesn't work and describing a mechanical alternative.
    – jamesdlin
    Mar 24, 2022 at 19:10
0

This a solution even without templates but the concept doesn't match what I am looking for.

  • In the question above, X and x are two different kinds of services by themselves.
  • In the solution below, X is a service using A1 or A2 as subservice providers.

Voilà:

abstract class A
{
  A();
  
  int f();
}

class A1 extends A
{
  A1();

  @override
  int f() => 1515;
}

class A2 extends A
{
  A2();

  @override
  int f()=>1789;
}

class X {
  late A t;
  
  X(A x){
    t = x;
  }
  int x() => t.f();
}

void main()
{
  X x1 = X(A1());
  X x2 = X(A2());
  
  print( x1.x() ); // Indeed prints 1515
  print( x2.x() ); // Indeed prints 1789
}

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