5

Say that I have the following interface:

public interface ITeam
{
    bool HasPlayer(IPlayer player);
    void AddPlayer(IPlayer player);
}

I currently have a test that looks something along the lines of (using AutoMoq):

[Theory]
[MyAutoData]
public void ShouldRosterToTeamWhenPlayerIsNotRostered(Player player, Mock<ITeam> mockedTeam)
{
    player.RosterToTeam(mockedTeam.Object);

    mockedTeam.Verify(team => team.AddPlayer(player), Times.Once);
}

However, a precondition in my code is that HasPlayer must return false for the test to pass when RosterToTeam is called.

This can be solved by creating a ICustomization and directly composing the correct behaviour, for example:

public class TeamCustomization : ICustomization
{
    public void Customize(IFixture fixture)
    {
        fixture.Customize<Mock<ITeam>>(composer =>
            composer.Do(mock =>
                        mock.Setup(team => team.HasPlayer(It.IsAny<IPlayer>()))
                            .Returns(false)));
    }
}

However, I'd like my tests always to assume that the boolean methods have a default value of false. I've tried looking into ISpecimenBuilder, but couldn't see a way to achieve this, as it seems to only work on properties, parameters, etc.

Is anyone able to recommend me a way of generically setting up all boolean methods to return false by default when created in this fashion?

Edit: The culprit behind the behaviour change is when ConfigureMembers = true is set for AutoMoqCustomization.

This is what my MyAutoDataAttribute currently looks like:

public class MyAutoDataAttribute : AutoDataAttribute
{
    public MyAutoDataAttribute() : base(Create)
    {
    }

    private static IFixture Create()
    {
        var fixture = new Fixture();

        fixture.Customize(new AutoMoqCustomization
        {
            ConfigureMembers = true
        });

        fixture.Customize(new TeamCustomization());

        return fixture;
    }
}

For my use case, ConfigureMembers = true is still needed (and would like to remove the TeamCustomization).

3 Answers 3

2

First of all, you may want to use AutoMoqDataAttribute to create a mock of the ITeam interface:

public class AutoMoqDataAttribute : AutoDataAttribute
{
    public AutoMoqDataAttribute()
        : base(new Fixture().Customize(new AutoMoqCustomization()))
    {
    }
}

There is no need in cusomizing fixture to configure your mocks. You'd better do that in the tests itself (the arrange section):

[Theory, AutoMoqData]
public void ShouldRosterToTeamWhenPlayerIsNotRostered(Player player, Mock<ITeam> mockedTeam)
{
    mockedTeam.Setup(t => t.HasPlayer(player)).Returns(false);
    player.RosterToTeam(mockedTeam.Object);
    mockedTeam.Verify(team => team.AddPlayer(player), Times.Once);
}

[Theory, AutoMoqData]
public void ShouldNotRosterToTeamWhenPlayerIsRostered(Player player, Mock<ITeam> mockedTeam)
{
    mockedTeam.Setup(t => t.HasPlayer(player)).Returns(true);
    player.RosterToTeam(mockedTeam.Object);
    mockedTeam.Verify(team => team.AddPlayer(player), Times.Never);
}

and, finaly, the simplified RoastToTeam implementation:

public class Player
{
    public void RosterToTeam(ITeam team)
    {
        if (team.HasPlayer(this))
        {
            return;
        }
        team.AddPlayer(this);
    }
}
3
  • 1
    Thanks for the concerns, but this isn't the answer I'm looking for. I'm wanting to change the default behaviour for all boolean methods to return false. Whether this is best practice or not is irrelevant to the question.
    – Hayden
    Mar 26, 2022 at 22:34
  • Isn't False returned by default? I can comment the mockedTeam.Setup(t => t.HasPlayer(player)).Returns(false); line in my first test and it will still pass. Mar 27, 2022 at 8:47
  • I've edited the question with more detail. The culprit behind the behaviour change is when you set ConfigureMembers = true, which will auto-populate values to objects.
    – Hayden
    Mar 27, 2022 at 9:57
1
+100

Considering everything that was proposed so far, I believe the only other option is to implement your own custom AutoMoqCustomizaiton that will treat the methods returning bool as a special case and will omit setting them.

You could create a behavior that would reset the members to return false, but you would not be able to then customize your mocks to return any value other than false, since behaviors work at the moment AutoFixture has already created the value.

Creating or altering the setup for all members returning bool in a mock object by just using reflection is not an easy task. You'll have to copy a good chunk of the AutoMoq into your code base. Luckily for you the license under which we publish AutoFixture is the most permissive of all OSS licenses, so you can copy and distribute your custom version without any restrictions.

The part that you'll likely want to change is this line here, in MockVirtualMethodsCommand. Your version should look something like this.

foreach (var method in methods.Where(x => x.ReturnType != typeof(bool)))

If this was my code-base, in cases like this I would not use mocks at all, and would probably opt for fakes. Consider the same code you proposed but instead of using Moq, the test project would implement the ITeam interface in a local class.

public class FakeTeam : ITeam
{
    public List<IPlayer> Players { get; set; } = new();

    public bool HasPlayer(IPlayer player)
    {
       return this.Players.Contains(player);
    }

    public void AddPlayer(IPlayer player)
    {
       this.Players.Add(player);
    }
}

Now the same test that you wrote would look something like this.

[Theory, AutoData]
public void ShouldRosterToTeamWhenPlayerIsNotRostered(
    Player player, FakeTeam team)
{
    player.RosterToTeam(team);

    Assert.Contains(player, team.Players); 
}

Depending on your business you might even want to use the actual implementation of ITeam, and that would be fine.

1
  • 1
    Thank you for your answer. I went ahead and copied AutoMoqCustomization and modified it to suit my purpose.
    – Hayden
    Mar 31, 2022 at 10:44
0

As far I can see, AutoMoq resolves the returntype directly. (Source here)

Which means you can't make all method that returns bool to return false unless you inject the value (fixture.Inject(false)) - which then of course means that you'll get false each time you ask AF for a bool.

What I've done in your scenario, is to create an empty interface that inherits from the interface I want to modify the behavior for, and register it.

Like this:

...
public interface ITeamFake : ITeam {} // empty interface for modifying the mock
...

// Modify ITeam behavior
fixture.Register<Mock<ITeamFake>, Mock<ITeam>>(t => 
    {
        t.Setup(m => m.HasPlayer(It.IsAny<IPlayer>())).Returns(true);       
        return t.As<ITeam>();       
    });
       

This works for me anyways.

2
  • 1
    This is a neat solution, the problem is that I wanted to create a general purpose solution to this problem, and not have to create new interfaces everywhere, as that would just be a repeat of what I've done originally.
    – Hayden
    Mar 31, 2022 at 10:47
  • I figure it can be done, but I think one needs to almost recreate MockVirtualMethodsCommand at which point it's probably just better to do what you've done - and copy AutoMoqCustomization.
    – Magnus
    Mar 31, 2022 at 13:46

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