16

I'd like to construct an object that works like a random number generator, but generates numbers in a specified sequence.

# a random number generator
rng = lambda : np.random.randint(2,20)//2

# a non-random number generator
def nrng():
    numbers = np.arange(1,10.5,0.5)
    for i in range(len(numbers)):
        yield numbers[i]

for j in range(10):
    print('random number', rng())
    print('non-random number', nrng())

The issue with the code above that I cannot call nrng in the last line because it is a generator. I know that the most straightforward way to rewrite the code above is to simply loop over the non-random numbers instead of defining the generator. I would prefer getting the example above to work because I am working with a large chunk of code that include a function that accepts a random number generator as an argument, and I would like to add the functionality to pass non-random number sequences without rewriting the entire code.

EDIT: I see some confusion in the comments. I am aware that python's random number generators generate pseudo-random numbers. This post is about replacing a pseudo-random-number generator by a number generator that generates numbers from a non-random, user-specified sequence (e.g., a generator that generates the number sequence 1,1,2,2,1,0,1 if I want it to).

11
  • 4
    Do you want to be able to continuously sample from your non-random number pool? Or do you want it to exhaust? If you have an actual sequence, and not just the toy example above, can you write a recurrence relation for it?
    – ddejohn
    Mar 29, 2022 at 2:57
  • 7
    As an aside, you could use seeding to still take advantage of RNG while also making it reproducible. I'm assuming you want this functionality for some sort of debugging?
    – ddejohn
    Mar 29, 2022 at 3:02
  • 2
    This is how all number generators work. Show me an algorithm to generate something truly random :)
    – Tvde1
    Mar 29, 2022 at 14:10
  • Such a generator is sometimes called a "deterministic" generator. They often get used in unit testing to replace randomness to help test corner cases that are extremely rare with proper psudorandom numbers, but can be made to occur quickly with the right sequence.
    – Cort Ammon
    Mar 29, 2022 at 17:43
  • I can't believe no one has mentioned en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linear-feedback_shift_register Mar 30, 2022 at 6:15

6 Answers 6

19

You can call next() with a generator or iterator as an argument to withdraw exactly one element from it. Saving the generator to a variable beforehand allows you to do this multiple times.

# make it a generator
def _rng():
    while True:
        yield np.random.randint(2,20)//2

# a non-random number generator
def _nrng():
    numbers = np.arange(1,10.5,0.5)
    for i in range(len(numbers)):
        yield numbers[i]

rng = _rng()
nrng = _nrng()
for j in range(10):
    print('random number', next(rng))
    print('non-random number', next(nrng))
5
  • 2
    This is an excellent (and upvoted) point. But you could achieve the same effect with less overhead with def _nrng(): return iter(np.arange(1, 10.5, 0.5)) (or even _nrng = lambda:np.arange(1, 10.5, 0.5)).
    – rici
    Mar 29, 2022 at 1:26
  • 1
    I think OP wants to receive the "next number" by just doing nrng(), since downstream code which presumably accepts nrng will call it that way. Mar 29, 2022 at 1:49
  • I think OP should consider explicitly using next() though, as it is pretty unambiguous.
    – ddejohn
    Mar 29, 2022 at 2:55
  • 7
    @PranavHosangadi Instead of passing nrng they can use lambda: next(nrng) as argument...
    – GACy20
    Mar 29, 2022 at 14:54
  • 1
    @GACy20 That's a much better answer to this question than this one. Green Cloak Guy's answer is true generally, but does not answer the actual question asked.
    – Numeri
    Mar 30, 2022 at 1:59
15

Edit:

The cleanest way to do this would be to use a lambda to wrap your call to next(nrng) as per great comment from @GACy20:

def nrng_gen():
    yield from range(10)

nrng = nrng_gen()

nrng_func = lambda: next(nrng)

for i in range(10):
    print(nrng_func())

Original answer:

If you want your object to keep state and look like a function, create a custom class with __call__ method.

eg.

class NRNG:
    def __init__(self):
        self.numbers = range(10)
        self.state = -1
    def __call__(self):
        self.state += 1
        return self.numbers[self.state]
        
nrng = NRNG()


for i in range(10):
    print(nrng())

However, I wouldn't recommend this unless absolutely necessary, as it obscures the fact that your nrng keeps a state (although technically, most rngs keep their state internally).

It's best to just use a regular generator with yield by calling next on it or to write a custom iterator (also class-based). Those will work with things like for loops and other python tools for iteration (like the excellent itertools package).

7

np.random.randint can remember the last number it generated because it's a function of the np.random.RandomState class. Numpy simply aliases the class method so that it's accessible directly from the np.random module instead of having you access it through the class.

Knowing this, you can write your own class to work like so:

class NotRandom:

    numbers = np.arange(1,10.5,0.5)
    last_index = -1

    @classmethod
    def nrng(cls):
        cls.last_index += 1
        if cls.last_index < len(cls.numbers):
            return cls.numbers[cls.last_index]
        # else:
        return None

# Create an alias to the classmethod
nrng = NotRandom.nrng      # Note this is OUTSIDE the class

Then, you can do:

print(nrng())    # 1.0
print(nrng())    # 1.5
print(nrng())    # 2.0

If you want to be able to have multiple concurrent instances of nrng, you could make nrng() an instance method instead of a class method:

class NotRandom:
    def __init__(self):
        self.numbers = np.arange(1,10.5,0.5)
        self.last_index = -1

    def nrng(self):
        self.last_index += 1
        if self.last_index < len(self.numbers):
            return self.numbers[self.last_index]
        # else:
        return None

# Create an object. Then create an alias to its method
nrng = NotRandom().nrng 

Then, you can use nrng() to refer to the method that's bound to the NotRandom instance you created. If you want another instance, you can have that too:

another_notrandom = NotRandom()
nrng2 = another_notrandom.rng

print(nrng())    # 1.0
print(nrng())    # 1.5

print(nrng2())   # 1.0

print(nrng())    # 2.0

print(nrng2())   # 1.5

6
  • It's really weird that you chose to use a class method.
    – user253751
    Mar 29, 2022 at 19:40
  • Why? @user253751 Mar 29, 2022 at 19:47
  • well... what is the point of having a class without instances?
    – user253751
    Mar 29, 2022 at 19:52
  • @user253751 to keep track of state?
    – Esther
    Mar 29, 2022 at 20:05
  • 2
    @user253751 Global variables are a not such a great idea. The class nicely encapsulates all the information relevant to its own calculations within itself. If you want multiple instances of the generator, don't make it a class method like the second half of my answer shows. Static functions and static classes are a thing in lots of other languages. This isn't some python-specific shenanigans (you should know, you have a gold badge in java and c++) Mar 29, 2022 at 20:17
5

function that accepts a random number generator as an argument

Call it like this then:

that_function(nrng().__next__)

Or with functools.partial:

that_function(partial(next, nrng()))

Or without your generator, if that arange is all you want:

that_function(iter(np.arange(1,10.5,0.5)).__next__)

Demo code (rng and nrng are yours, I added that_function and the test calls):

import numpy as np
from functools import partial

# a random number generator
rng = lambda : np.random.randint(2,20)//2

# a non-random number generator
def nrng():
    numbers = np.arange(1,10.5,0.5)
    for i in range(len(numbers)):
        yield numbers[i]

def that_function(rng):
    print(*(rng() for j in range(10)))

that_function(rng)
that_function(nrng().__next__)
that_function(iter(np.arange(1,10.5,0.5)).__next__)
that_function(partial(next, nrng()))

Output (Try it online!):

4 6 1 3 8 7 3 6 2 1
1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 3.5 4.0 4.5 5.0 5.5
1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 3.5 4.0 4.5 5.0 5.5
1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 3.5 4.0 4.5 5.0 5.5
1
  • 1
    This is the best answer, if OP really wants to avoid refactoring their code.
    – ddejohn
    Mar 29, 2022 at 3:02
3

The simplest solution to making a generator callable is to make a bound method for __next__:

>>> def f():
        yield 10
        yield 20
        yield 30
    
>>> g = f().__next__
>>> g()
10
>>> g()
20
>>> g()
30
0
0

I do agree, next() seems the way to go. Honestly I would have simply done something like this:

# Get the first n numbers (10 in this case)

for i,j in enumerate(nrng()):  
    if i > 9:
        break
    print('random number', rng())
    print('non-random number', j)
    
# Or this if you want to get all numbers in nrng()

for j in nrng():
    print('random number', rng())
    print('non-random number', j)

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