14

I have this SQL statement and SQL Server is giving me the following error:

An aggregate may not appear in the WHERE clause unless it is in a subquery contained in a HAVING clause or a select list.

SELECT 
  SUM(M1.InvoiceTotal)-SUM(M1.AmountApplied) as PastDueAmount
  , M1.BillingID
  , M2.Name
  , M2.DelinquentDaysThreshold
  , M2.DelinquentAmountThreshold
  , DATEDIFF(d, MIN(BillingDate),GETDATE()) as DaysLate
FROM Invoices M1 
LEFT JOIN ClientAccounts M2 ON M1.BillingID = M2.ID
WHERE 
  InvoiceTotal <> AmountApplied
  AND M2.DelinquentDaysThreshold > DATEDIFF(d, MIN(BillingDate),GETDATE())
  OR (SUM(M1.InvoiceTotal)-SUM(M1.AmountApplied)) > M2.DelinquentAmountThreshold
GROUP BY 
  M1.BillingID
  , M2.Name
  , M2.DelinquentDaysThreshold
  , M2.DelinquentAmountThreshold

In the where clause, I only want to pull records where the oldest unpaid Billing Invoice Date is greater than the DelinquentDaysThreshhold (in days), OR the PastDueAmount (a calculated value) is greater than the DelinquentAmountThreshold.
For some reason SQL Server does not like aggregated amounts.

26

Use the HAVING as per the error message, which requires a GROUP BY

SELECT
    SUM(M1.InvoiceTotal)-SUM(M1.AmountApplied) as PastDueAmount, 
    M1.BillingID, M2.Name, 
    M2.DelinquentDaysThreshold, M2.DelinquentAmountThreshold,
    DATEDIFF(d, MIN(BillingDate),GETDATE()) as DaysLate
FROM
    Invoices M1
    LEFT JOIN
    ClientAccounts M2 ON M1.BillingID = M2.ID
WHERE
    InvoiceTotal <> AmountApplied
    AND
    M2.DelinquentDaysThreshold > DATEDIFF(d, MIN(BillingDate),GETDATE())
GROUP BY
    M1.BillingID, M2.Name, 
    M2.DelinquentDaysThreshold, M2.DelinquentAmountThreshold,
    DATEDIFF(d, MIN(BillingDate),GETDATE())
HAVING
    (SUM(M1.InvoiceTotal)-SUM(M1.AmountApplied)) > M2.DelinquentAmountThreshold
2

Use "Having" for use with aggregate functions.

Heres a link: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms180199.aspx

0

In the where clause, I only want to pull records where the oldest unpaid Billing Invoice Date is greater than the DelinquentDaysThreshhold (in days)

Some performance considerations with the HAVING clause:

When you use GROUP BY with the HAVING clause, the GROUP BY clause divides the rows into sets of grouped rows and aggregates their values, andthen the HAVING clause eliminates undesired aggregated groups. In many cases,you can write your select statement so it will contain only WHERE and GROUP BY clauses without a HAVING clause.

As an alternative to the HAVING clause, you can also use derived tables to solve this problem:

SELECT t1.SomeID, t1.SomeThreshold, totals.NumericTotal
FROM   Table1 t1
       INNER JOIN (
          SELECT SomeID, SUM(SomeNumericValue) NumericTotal
          FROM Table1
          Group By SomeID
       ) totals
           ON t1.SomeID = totals.SomeID
WHERE totals.NumericTotal > t1.SomeThreshold
  • 2
    Where did you copy/paste this generic answer that doesn't match OP's question? – gbn Aug 23 '11 at 19:48
  • 1
    @gbn: Excuse me? The OP asked how to use an aggragated total in the where clause. This accomplishes that. No need to be rude, dude. – James Johnson Aug 23 '11 at 19:51
  • 2
    You'd use HAVING then, not a derived table. I'll rephrase then: why did you spend time writing this snippet rather then using OP's original query? – gbn Aug 23 '11 at 19:54
  • 1
    -1 - When OP gives you code (and it's not insanely complicated) it's better to actually use it. – JNK Aug 23 '11 at 20:02
  • 2
    I am always in favor of pointing out more than one way of solving a problem, and I am in fact glad you pointed out this alternative. However, in a case like this it is worth saying explicitly that this is just an alternative for edification and that HAVING would be preferred in virtually every scenario where either one would work. – TimothyAWiseman Aug 23 '11 at 20:18

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