24

Using bash, how can I search for all occurrences of the substring 'foo' in all filenames (including folders) contained recursively in a directory and replace them them with 'bar'?

For example, if the current structure looks like:

-foo_test
    - fooo.txt
    - xfoo
        - yfoo.h
- 1foo.c

It should look like this after running the bash script:

-bar_test
    - baro.txt
    - xbar
        - ybar.h
- 1bar.c
  • Will you need to worry about files containing foo twice? e.g. rename foo-foo.txt to bar-bar.txt – Adrian Pronk Aug 24 '11 at 7:45
  • @Adrian: Yes, I will. – Cam Aug 24 '11 at 8:19
48

Both variations shown here using work correctly on OPs test structure:

find . -depth -name '*foo*' -execdir bash -c 'mv -i "$1" "${1//foo/bar}"' bash {} \;

or, if you have a very large number of files and want it to run faster:

find . -depth -name '*foo*' -execdir bash -c 'for f; do mv -i "$f" "${f//foo/bar}"; done' bash {} +

EDIT: As noted in the comments, my earlier answer using a find command that did not use the execdir option and using rename has problems renaming files in directories that contain foo in their name. As suggested, I have changed the find commands to use -execdir, and I have deleted the variation using the rename command since it is a non-standard command.

  • 2
    ... assuming you have the rename command, which is nonstandard. – tripleee Aug 24 '11 at 7:26
  • 1
    Wouldn't you need a g in the regex if he can have foo multiple times? (that is s/foo/bar/g) – carlpett Aug 24 '11 at 9:13
  • 1
    @triplee - And even worse, there are two different non-compatible variants that I see installed on different distros. – Kaleb Pederson Aug 24 '11 at 18:07
  • for f in "$@"; can be shortened to for f; as "$@" is used by default in the absence of a list. I'd use -execdir as it is both safer and because mv path/foo/more/path/foo.txt path/bar/more/path/bar.txt won't work. See BashFAQ 30 for even more ideas. – jw013 Aug 24 '11 at 18:27
  • 1
    @SSTeve: But I see that the original attempt using rename without -execdir failed so I have deleted that from my answer. – Adrian Pronk Aug 25 '11 at 19:59
3

This was tricky because of directory names with multiple instances of "foo". When you change ./foo_test/xfoo to ./bar_test/xbar everything that was in ./foo_test becomes inaccessible. So I changed the file names first then changed the last occurrence of "foo" in the directory names. I added echo statements to track what's going on during development. You can, of course, expunge them.

#!/bin/sh
#first change the file names
#append '.' to process files in current directory
for D in $(find -d . -name "*foo*" -type d ) '.' 
do 
    pushd $D >> /dev/null
    echo 'directory: ' "$D"
    for file in $(find . -name "*foo*" -type f -maxdepth 1)
    do
        echo '    change' "$file" 'to' `echo "$file" | sed s/foo/bar/g`
        mv "$file" `echo "$file" | sed s/foo/bar/g`
    done
    popd >> /dev/null
done

echo ''

#Now change the directory names
for D in $(find -d . -name "*foo*" -type d )
do 
    echo 'change' "$D" 'to' `echo "$D" | sed 's/\(.*\)foo/\1bar/'`
    #change only the last occurance of foo
    mv "$D" `echo "$D" | sed 's/\(.*\)foo/\1bar/'`
done

I have no doubt there are shorter, more elegant ways to do this (probably just by removing half of the lines in this script), but I'm pretty sure this works.


EDIT The identical loops were a red flag. This version only loops once. You get a message attempting mv '.' '.', but it's safely ignored.

#!/bin/sh
#first change the file names
#append '.' to change file in current directory
for D in $(find -d . -name "*foo*" -type d ) '.' 
do 
    pushd $D >> /dev/null
    echo 'directory: ' "$D"
    for file in $(find . -name "*foo*" -type f -maxdepth 1)
    do
        echo '    change' "$file" 'to' `echo "$file" | sed s/foo/bar/g`
        mv "$file" `echo "$file" | sed s/foo/bar/g`
    done
    popd >> /dev/null

    echo 'change' "$D" 'to' `echo "$D" | sed 's/\(.*\)foo/\1bar/'`
    #change only the last occurence of foo
    mv "$D" `echo "$D" | sed 's/\(.*\)foo/\1bar/'`
done

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