9

I'm new to Vue Composition API and need to use document.querySelector. However, it is not working as expected. If I write

<nav class="home-menu pure-menu pure-menu-horizontal pure-menu-fixed">

<script setup>
import { ref } from "vue";
const observer = new IntersectionObserver(handleIntersection);
const target = document.querySelector(".home-menu");
observer.observe(target);
console.log(target);

target is null. Reading the docs, I see the ref attribute, and if I

<nav ref="navbar" class="home-menu pure-menu pure-menu-horizontal pure-menu-fixed">
<script setup>
import { ref } from "vue";

const target = ref("navbar");
console.log(target);

an object is logged.

Is ref the way that you get a DOM element in Composition API?
Can I now use target in my observer object?
Is it equivalent to querySelector?

I tried

import { ref } from "vue";
const observer = new IntersectionObserver(handleIntersection);

const target = ref("navbar");
observer.observe(target);

but got this error:

Uncaught TypeError: IntersectionObserver.observe: Argument 1 does not implement interface Element.

2
  • 2
    Vue template refs are not like querySelector. querySelector takes a CSS selector and returns the matching element, if it exists. With template refs, you define a ref and use it in the template. Think of it like this, instead: you define a ref, as usual, and then, when the template is evaluated, the element with ref="name" uses the ref you defined, a bit like variable access. Apr 5, 2022 at 14:29
  • 1
    With querySelector, the DOM comes first, and you select something from it. With a template ref, the ref comes first, and then a element binds itself to that ref. Apr 5, 2022 at 14:32

2 Answers 2

15

The reason document.querySelector is returning null is that the DOM does not contain that element yet. The script setup runs when the component is created, so the component's DOM has not been created yet.

You can use the onMounted lifecycle hook to run code when the component has been mounted. I created a playground to demonstrate this.

From the Lifecycle docs:

For example, the onMounted hook can be used to run code after the component has finished the initial rendering and created the DOM nodes

There are then two approaches to achieve what you want. You can use continue to use querySelector, or you can use template refs. Personally, I use template refs for static elements (such as navbars, etc.) and querySelector for dynamic selections.

Using Template Refs

A template ref is a regular Vue ref, but by connecting it to an element or child component via the ref attribute you can obtain a direct reference to that element or component.
If you connected it to an element, the value will be that element; if you connected it to a child component, the value will be that component's component instance; if nothing is connected to it, the value will be null.

Steps

  • Create a ref:

    const navbar = ref(null);
    

    This will be used to refer to the element.

  • Connect the template ref to the element by setting the ref attribute on the element to the name you used for the template ref:

    <nav ref="navbar" ...>
    

    Paraphrasing the Template Refs docs:
    ref is a special attribute. It allows us to obtain a direct reference to a specific DOM element or child component instance after it's mounted.

  • Connect the observer when the component is mounted:

    onMounted(() => {
      observer.observe(navbar.value);
    })
    

    Paraphrasing the docs again:
    Note that you can only access the ref after the component is mounted. If you try to access navbar before then, it will be null. This is because the element doesn't exist until after the first render!

  • Optionally (see below), disconnect the observer when the component is being unmounted:

    onBeforeUnmount(() => {
      observer.disconnect();
    })
    

    Note that I don't believe this is technically necessary, as the observer should be garbage collected when the component is destroyed.
    You can fiddle around with this experiment I did in the SFC playground, trying to create a memory leak.

Code Example

<script setup>
import { ref, onMounted, onUnmounted } from "vue";

const el = ref(null);

const observer = new IntersectionObserver((entries, observer) => {
  console.log(entries)
});

onMounted(() => {
  observer.observe(el.value)
})

// Probably optional
onUnmounted(() => {
  observer.disconnect()
})
</script>

<template>
  <div ref="el">
    I'm the target!
  </div>
</template>

Using querySelector

Alternatively, you can still use querySelector. The same lifecycle considerations apply.

<nav class="home-menu ...">
onMounted(() => {
  const target = document.querySelector(".home-menu");
  observer.observe(target);
})

Code Example

<script setup>
import { onMounted, onUnmounted } from "vue";

const observer = new IntersectionObserver((entries, observer) => {
  console.log(entries)
});

onMounted(() => {
  const target = document.querySelector(".target");
  observer.observe(target);
})

// Probably optional
onUnmounted(() => {
  observer.disconnect()
})
</script>

<template>
  <div class="target">
    I'm the target!
  </div>
</template>

Other Docs

This is the diagram from the Lifecycle docs:

Vue Lifecycle Diagram

Side Notes

The reason console.log(target) did log an object is because a Vue ref is an object. The actual value is accessed via the value property.
The technical reason for this is that Vue can then detect when that property is accessed, and do its reactivity magic; including when it was a complete reassignment of the value.

5

You can use the ref approach, calling the variable with the same name you declared the ref in the template:

const navbar = ref(null);

However, you should await the component to be mounted to observe:

onMounted(() => {
  observer.observe(target);
})

remember also to disconnect it when you unmount the component:

onBeforeUnmount(() => {
  observer.disconnect();
})
2
  • Thanks guys for quick concise answers. I never ran into this trouble with vue 2. I guess running querySelector() from methods option does same thing.
    – Alan
    Apr 4, 2022 at 18:25
  • And for useful utilities for things like this, VueUse is incredible. Apr 4, 2022 at 18:29

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