18

I have an ObservableObject class and a SwiftUI view. When a button is tapped, I create a Task and call populate (an async function) from within it. I thought this would execute populate on a background thread but instead the entire UI freezes. Here's my code:

class ViewModel: ObservableObject {
    @Published var items = [String]()
    func populate() async {
        var items = [String]()
        for i in 0 ..< 4_000_000 { /// this usually takes a couple seconds
            items.append("\(i)")
        }
        self.items = items
    }
}

struct ContentView: View {
    @StateObject var model = ViewModel()
    @State var rotation = CGFloat(0)

    var body: some View {
        Button {
            Task {
                await model.populate()
            }
        } label: {
            Color.blue
                .frame(width: 300, height: 80)
                .overlay(
                    Text("\(model.items.count)")
                        .foregroundColor(.white)
                )
                .rotationEffect(.degrees(rotation))
        }
        .onAppear { /// should be a continuous rotation effect
            withAnimation(.easeInOut(duration: 2).repeatForever()) {
                rotation = 90
            }
        }
    }
}

Result:

Rotation animation freezes when the button is pressed

The button stops moving, then suddenly snaps back when populate finishes.

Weirdly, if I move the Task into populate itself and get rid of the async, the rotation animation doesn't stutter so I think the loop actually got executed in the background. However I now get a Publishing changes from background threads is not allowed warning.

func populate() {
    Task {
        var items = [String]()
        for i in 0 ..< 4_000_000 {
            items.append("\(i)")
        }
        self.items = items /// Publishing changes from background threads is not allowed; make sure to publish values from the main thread (via operators like receive(on:)) on model updates.
    }
}

/// ...

Button {
    model.populate()
}

Result:

Rotation animation continues even when the button is pressed

How can I ensure my code gets executed on a background thread? I think this might have something to do with MainActor but I'm not sure.

7
  • await means that you wait for the async function to return you a result (which obviously blocks the current thread, which is main). In your second option you run the task on a background thread, so you need to ensure that results of the task are delivered to the main thread. The error you see hints you about this and provides an example, how to achieve this. How do you deliver items to the UI? Is it just a property on an observable object? Apr 12, 2022 at 5:23
  • @lazarevzubov but aren't Tasks asynchronous? When I await inside a Task shouldn't the current thread be a background thread? I can't figure out the difference between the first and second options. Anyway in SwiftUI all you need to do is set the property and the UI automatically updates.
    – aheze
    Apr 12, 2022 at 5:54
  • Have you tried to use in your second option MainActor.run { self.items = items } to move the update to the main thread? Apr 12, 2022 at 6:19
  • 1
    Task should be detached and a function performing published property modification is wrapped with MainActor - possible solution is here
    – Asperi
    Apr 12, 2022 at 8:54
  • 1
    I summarized my findings in this post: stackoverflow.com/a/73015435/8220920 Jul 18, 2022 at 9:56

5 Answers 5

20

Consider:

func populate() async {
    var items = [String]()
    for i in 0 ..< 4_000_000 {
        items.append("\(i)")
    }
    self.items = items
}

You have marked populate with async, but there is nothing asynchronous here, and it will block the calling thread.

Then consider:

func populate() {
    Task {
        var items = [String]()
        for i in 0 ..< 4_000_000 {
            items.append("\(i)")
        }
        self.items = items
    }
}

That looks like it must be asynchronous, since it is launching a Task. But this Task runs on the same actor, and because the task is slow and synchronous, it will block the current executor.

If you do not want it to run on the main actor, you can either:

  1. You can leave the view model on the main actor, but manually move the slow synchronous process to a detached task:

    @MainActor
    class ViewModel: ObservableObject {
        @Published var items = [String]()
    
        func populate() {
            Task.detached {
                var items = [String]()
                for i in 0 ..< .random(in: 4_000_000...5_000_000) { // made it random so I could see values change
                    items.append("\(i)")
                }
                await MainActor.run { [items] in
                    self.items = items
                }
            }
        }
    }
    
  2. For the sake of completeness, you could also make the view model to be its own actor, and only designate the relevant observed properties as being on the main actor:

    actor ViewModel: ObservableObject {
        @MainActor
        @Published var items = [String]()
    
        func populate() {
            Task {
                var items = [String]()
                for i in 0 ..< .random(in: 4_000_000...5_000_000) { // made it random so I could see values change
                    items.append("\(i)")
                }
                await MainActor.run { [items] in
                    self.items = items
                }
            }
        }
    }
    

I would generally lean towards the former, but both approaches work.

Either way, it will allow the slow process to not block the main thread. Here I tapped on the button twice:

enter image description here


See WWDC 2021 videos Swift concurrency: Behind the scenes, Protect mutable state with Swift actors, and Swift concurrency: Update a sample app, all of which are useful when trying to grok the transition from GCD to Swift concurrency.

7

First, you can't have it both ways; Either you perform your CPU intensive work on the main thread (and have a negative impact on the UI) or you perform the work on another thread, but you need to explicitly dispatch the UI update onto the main thread.

However, what you are really asking about is

(By using Task) I thought this would execute populate on a background thread but instead the entire UI freezes.

When you use a Task you are using unstructured concurrency, and when you initialise your Task via init(priority:operation) the task ... inherits the priority and actor context of the caller.

While the Task is executed asynchronously, it does so using the actor context of the caller, which in the context of a View body is the main actor. This means that while your task is executed asynchronously, it still runs on the main thread and that thread is not available for UI updates while it is processing. So you are correct, this has everything to do with MainActor.

When you move the Task into populate it is no longer being created in a MainActor context and therefore does not execute on the main thread.

As you have discovered, you need to use this second approach to avoid the main thread. All you need to do to your code is move the final update back to the main queue using the MainActor:

func populate() {
    Task {
        var items = [String]()
        for i in 0 ..< 4_000_000 {
            items.append("\(i)")
        }
        await MainActor.run {
            self.items = items 
        }
    }
}

You could also use Task.detached() in the body context to create a Task that is not attached the MainActor context.

2
  • 1
    Thanks, that part about inheriting the context makes sense. But about the DispatchQueue.main.async {, I heard that you shouldn't mix async/await with the old stuff, do you know if there's any impact? I also tried replacing Task with Task.detached and nothing happened.
    – aheze
    Apr 12, 2022 at 14:09
  • Correct, see my update
    – Paulw11
    Apr 12, 2022 at 20:08
6

Update 6/10/22: At WWDC I asked some Apple engineers about this problem — it really is all about actor inheritance. However, there were some compiler-level changes in Xcode 14 Beta. For example, this will run smoothly on Xcode 14, but lag on Xcode 13:

class ViewModel: ObservableObject {
    @Published var items = [String]()

    func populate() async {
        var items = [String]()
        for i in 0 ..< 4_000_000 { /// this usually takes a couple seconds
            items.append("\(i)")
        }

        /// explicitly capture `items` to avoid `Reference to captured var 'items' in concurrently-executing code; this is an error in Swift 6`
        Task { @MainActor [items] in
            self.items = items
        }
    }
}

struct ContentView: View {
    @StateObject var model = ViewModel()
    @State var rotation = CGFloat(0)

    var body: some View {
        Button {
            Task {

                /// *Note!* Executes on a background thread in Xcode 14.
                await self.model.populate()
            }
        } label: {
            Color.blue
                .frame(width: 300, height: 80)
                .overlay(
                    Text("\(model.items.count)")
                        .foregroundColor(.white)
                )
                .rotationEffect(.degrees(rotation))
        }
        .onAppear { /// should be a continuous rotation effect
            withAnimation(.easeInOut(duration: 2).repeatForever()) {
                rotation = 90
            }
        }
    }
}

Again, Task inherits the context of where it's called.

  • A Task called from within a plain ObservableObject class will run in the background, since the class isn't a main actor.
  • A Task called inside a Button will probably run on the main actor, since the Button is a UI element. Except, Xcode 14 changed some things and it actually runs in the background too...

To make sure a function runs on the background thread, independent of the inherited actor context, you can add nonisolated.

nonisolated func populate() async {

}

Note: the Visualize and optimize Swift concurrency video is super helpful.

3
  • 1
    Re "Xcode 14 changed some things and it actually runs in the background too", how to know for sure? I tried Thread.isMainThread, but it says "Class property isMainThread is unavailable from asynchronous contexts." If a Task is running asynchronously but in the MainActor context, a UI @State var can be updated directly, but if the Task is on a different thread, then the @State var needs to be updated on the main thread using DispatchQueue.main.async or a @MainActor decorator on the @State var itself, correct? Or you will get the purple warning about an update on a background thread. Dec 22, 2022 at 14:55
  • Not that sure — that's what the Apple engineer told me...
    – aheze
    Dec 22, 2022 at 17:27
  • Interesting! I'm sure it's right then. I wish they had more documentation about it. Maybe the docs will get better over time. Dec 22, 2022 at 19:10
3

As others have mentioned, the reason of this behavior is that the Task.init inherits the actor context automatically. You're calling your function from the button callback:

Button {
    Task {
        await model.populate()
    }
} label: {

}

The button callback is on the main actor, so the closure passed to the Task initializer is on the main actor too.

One solution is using a detached task:

func populate() async {
    Task.detached {
        // Calculation here
    }
}

While detached tasks are unstructured, I'd like to suggest structured tasks like async let tasks:

@MainActor
class ViewModel: ObservableObject {
    @Published var items = [String]()

    func populate() async {
        async let newItems = { () -> [String] in
            var items = [String]()
            for i in 0 ..< 4_000_000 {
                items.append("\(i)")
            }
            return items
        }()

        items = await newItems
    }
}

This is useful when you want the populate function to return some value asynchronously. This structured task approach also means cancellation can be propagated automatically. For example, if you want to cancel the calculation when the button is tapped multiple times in a short time, you can do something like this:

@MainActor
class ViewModel: ObservableObject {
    @Published var items = [String]()

    func populate() async {
        async let newItems = { () -> [String] in
            var items = [String]()
            for i in 0 ..< 4_000_000 {
                // Stop in the middle if cancelled
                if i % 1000 == 0 && Task.isCancelled {
                    break
                }
                items.append("\(i)")
            }
            return items
        }()

        items = await newItems
    }
}

struct ContentView: View {
    @StateObject var model: ViewModel
    @State var task: Task<Void, Never>?

    init() {
        _model = StateObject(wrappedValue: ViewModel())
    }

    var body: some View {
        Button {
            task?.cancel() // Cancel previous task if any
            task = Task {
                await model.populate()
            }
        } label: {
            // ...
        }
    }
}

Moreover, withTaskGroup also creates structured tasks and you can avoid inheriting the actor context too. It can be useful when your computation has multiple child tasks that can progress concurrently.

1

You can fix it by removing the class. You aren't using Combine so you don't need its ObservableObject and SwiftUI is most efficient if you stick to value types. The button doesn't hang with this design:

extension String {
    static func makeItems() async -> [String]{
        var items = [String]()
        for i in 0 ..< 4_000_000 { /// this usually takes a couple seconds
            items.append("\(i)")
        }
        return items
    }
}

struct AnimateContentView: View {
    @State var rotation = CGFloat(0)
    @State var items = [String]()
    
    var body: some View {
        Button {
            Task {
                items = await String.makeItems()
            }
        } label: {
            Color.blue
                .frame(width: 300, height: 80)
                .overlay(
                    Text("\(items.count)")
                        .foregroundColor(.white)
                )
                .rotationEffect(.degrees(rotation))
        }
        .onAppear { /// should be a continuous rotation effect
            withAnimation(.easeInOut(duration: 2).repeatForever()) {
                rotation = 90
            }
        }
    }
}
3
  • Thanks! How come the class causes problems though? I would prefer to keep it for the code organization and ability to share state with UIKit
    – aheze
    Apr 12, 2022 at 14:10
  • you can use custom structs for that
    – malhal
    Apr 12, 2022 at 14:52
  • 1
    @aheze There's nothing wrong with using classes for what you're doing. Feel free to use them.
    – damd
    Oct 26, 2022 at 21:17

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