11

I'm trying to apply the Sobel filter on an image to detect edges using scipy. I'm using Python 3.2 (64 bit) and scipy 0.9.0 on Windows 7 Ultimate (64 bit). Currently my code is as follows:

import scipy
from scipy import ndimage

im = scipy.misc.imread('bike.jpg')
processed = ndimage.sobel(im, 0)
scipy.misc.imsave('sobel.jpg', processed)

I don't know what I'm doing wrong, but the processed image does not look anything like what it should. The image, 'bike.jpg' is a greyscale (mode 'L' not 'RGB') image so each pixel has only one value associated with it.

Unfortunately I can't post the images here yet (don't have enough reputation) but I've provided links below:

Original Image (bike.jpg): http://s2.postimage.org/64q8w613j/bike.jpg

Scipy Filtered (sobel.jpg): http://s2.postimage.org/64qajpdlb/sobel.jpg

Expected Output: http://s1.postimage.org/5vexz7kdr/normal_sobel.jpg

I'm obviously going wrong somewhere! Can someone please tell me where. Thanks.

24

1) Use a higher precision. 2) You are only calculating the approximation of the derivative along the zero axis. The 2D Sobel operator is explained on Wikipedia. Try this code:

import numpy
import scipy
from scipy import ndimage

im = scipy.misc.imread('bike.jpg')
im = im.astype('int32')
dx = ndimage.sobel(im, 0)  # horizontal derivative
dy = ndimage.sobel(im, 1)  # vertical derivative
mag = numpy.hypot(dx, dy)  # magnitude
mag *= 255.0 / numpy.max(mag)  # normalize (Q&D)
scipy.misc.imsave('sobel.jpg', mag)
  • Yes, I wanted the derivative across the 0 axis (dx). I'm actually trying to implement the Canny edge detector and was having problems calculating the gradient using the Sobel operators. Thanks so much! I needed to change the precision. – Feanor Aug 25 '11 at 8:14
7

I couldn't comment on cgohlke's answer so I repeated his answer with a corrction. Parameter 0 is used for vertical derivative and 1 for horizontal derivative (first axis of an image array is y/vertical direction - rows, and second axis is x/horizontal direction - columns). Just wanted to warn other users, because I lost 1 hour searching for mistake in the wrong places.

import numpy
import scipy
from scipy import ndimage

im = scipy.misc.imread('bike.jpg')
im = im.astype('int32')
dx = ndimage.sobel(im, 1)  # horizontal derivative
dy = ndimage.sobel(im, 0)  # vertical derivative
mag = numpy.hypot(dx, dy)  # magnitude
mag *= 255.0 / numpy.max(mag)  # normalize (Q&D)
scipy.misc.imsave('sobel.jpg', mag)
  • 2
    Just to be clear, the gradient being orthogonal to the edge, the horizontal derivative detects vertical edges. – dtk Aug 21 '16 at 22:44
1

or you can use :

def sobel_filter(im, k_size):

    im = im.astype(np.float)
    width, height, c = im.shape
    if c > 1:
        img = 0.2126 * im[:,:,0] + 0.7152 * im[:,:,1] + 0.0722 * im[:,:,2]
    else:
        img = im

    assert(k_size == 3 or k_size == 5);

    if k_size == 3:
        kh = np.array([[-1, 0, 1], [-2, 0, 2], [-1, 0, 1]], dtype = np.float)
        kv = np.array([[1, 2, 1], [0, 0, 0], [-1, -2, -1]], dtype = np.float)
    else:
        kh = np.array([[-1, -2, 0, 2, 1], 
                   [-4, -8, 0, 8, 4], 
                   [-6, -12, 0, 12, 6],
                   [-4, -8, 0, 8, 4],
                   [-1, -2, 0, 2, 1]], dtype = np.float)
        kv = np.array([[1, 4, 6, 4, 1], 
                   [2, 8, 12, 8, 2],
                   [0, 0, 0, 0, 0], 
                   [-2, -8, -12, -8, -2],
                   [-1, -4, -6, -4, -1]], dtype = np.float)

    gx = signal.convolve2d(img, kh, mode='same', boundary = 'symm', fillvalue=0)
    gy = signal.convolve2d(img, kv, mode='same', boundary = 'symm', fillvalue=0)

    g = np.sqrt(gx * gx + gy * gy)
    g *= 255.0 / np.max(g)

    #plt.figure()
    #plt.imshow(g, cmap=plt.cm.gray)      

    return g

for more see here

  • Does your code work for binary image as input? – Sigur Jul 5 '18 at 12:58

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