1

We are using very simple SELECT … WHERE queries (1000 rows, from a very small table with 18000 entries) to load time series data for plotting (for testing we are running the same query X times). While single queries to the MySQL database are fast as expected, multiple parallel queries are very slow (simplified python code for parallel queries below). When increasing the amount of parallel queries by a factor of 10 the mysql.slow_log shows query times that are twice as long, but in python the time for a single query fivefolds to tenfolds (0.04 seconds vs 0.4 second).

Furthermore, we can see that the first queries are much faster than the last ones (0.5 seconds for the last query vs. 0.06 seconds for the first query)

Obviously the table is fully indexed.

We also tried this with just a SLEEP(2) query and are getting a smaller but similar effect: For 20 of those each one comes back after around 2.03s, for 200 they take around 2.1s.

The innodb buffer seems to work fine as MySQL shows 0 Disk/IO reads when running the queries (all the data seems to be in memory). That means storage/IO is probably not the Problem.

CPU usage is probably not the bottleneck as indicated by the CPU usage graphs in AWS RDS. Network usage seems not to be the problem as well, because we see the effect also on smaller queries.

We are using the AWS RDS MySQL service on an db.t3.large instance (2 vCPU, 8GB RAM, 5GBit/s Network).

Code to reproduce the problem:

from concurrent.futures import ThreadPoolExecutor 
import pandas as pd 
import time 

executor = ThreadPoolExecutor(max_workers=200) 
futures = [] 

def read_db(query): 
    con = engine.connect() 
    start_single_query = time.time() 
    print(start_single) 
    result = pd.read_sql(query, con) 
    print(f"query finished: {time.time() - start_single}s")     
    con.close() 
    return result 

start_complete = time.time() 
query = "SELECT * FROM table WHERE id_security = 1000;" 
# query = "SELECT SLEEP(2)" 

for i in range(100):  
    future = executor.submit(read_db, query) 
    futures.append(future) 

for future in futures: # wait for all results 
    f=future.result() 
 
print(f"time total: {time.time() - start_complete}s") 

So the main questions are:

  • Why are the concurrent queries slower, even though we seem to not have any IO/CPU/Network bottlenecks?
  • Why is the query_time in the Slow Query log not similar to the query time, we can measure in Python?
  • Is this a sensible way to parallelize the queries in Python?

Update:

Create Table Statement:

CREATE TABLE `table` (
  `id_security` int(11) NOT NULL,
  `id_field` int(11) NOT NULL,
  `currency` varchar(3) DEFAULT NULL,
  `date` date NOT NULL,
  `timestamp` datetime DEFAULT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP,
  `value` double DEFAULT NULL,
  `source` int(11) NOT NULL DEFAULT '0',
  PRIMARY KEY (`id_security`,`id_field`,`date`,`source`),
  KEY `Dateindex` (`date`),
  KEY `id_security_id_field` (`id_security`,`id_field`),
  KEY `id_security` (`id_security`),
  KEY `id_field` (`id_field`),
  KEY `id_source` (`source`),
  KEY `PRIMARY_WITHOUT_SOURCE` (`id_security`,`id_field`,`date`,`value`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1;

These are the tried queries and their Explain statements (Don't mind the different table name in production): SELECT * FROM series_security WHERE id_security = 1002 AND id_field = 100 AND date>'2021-01-01'; Explain Statement 1

SELECT * FROM series_security WHERE id_security = 1002 AND id_field = 100; enter image description here

SELECT * FROM series_security WHERE id_security = 1002 enter image description here

The real table is 18.000.000 lines long, however that does not slow down the requests meaningfully. So the indices seem to work. Nevertheless, we tried it on the smaller 18.000 row table to be sure.

Update 2: That is just a dummy table to test the issue. The many indexes are not in production, otherwise Insert statements would be probably too slow.

The production table is created like that:

CREATE TABLE `table` (
  `id_security` int(11) NOT NULL,
  `id_field` int(11) NOT NULL,
  `currency` varchar(3) DEFAULT NULL,
  `date` date NOT NULL,
  `timestamp` datetime DEFAULT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP,
  `value` double DEFAULT NULL,
  `source` int(11) NOT NULL DEFAULT '0',
  PRIMARY KEY (`id_security`,`id_field`,`date`,`source`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1;

We played around with the indexes to get a feeling for the problem. But as long as the PRIMARY KEY is in there, it doesn't make a difference.

The id in the WHERE clause is a single integer.

innodb_buffer_pool_size is 3/4 of the memory, so 6GB (default RDS setting)

As we use the SAME query for all requests in this dummy example, innodb_buffer_pool is hit 100% and we have zero IO reads.

Futhermore even if we do a smaller query on a tiny dummy table, we see a similar effect.

In Production usually 500 to 20,000 lines are fetched with one query (Timeseries data).

In this dummy example we tried up to 200 threads (s. max_worker)

Regarding the production environment:

  • We are using the Flask framework
  • The server runs on AWS Beanstalk and we allow up to 200 Threads on the webserver (So 200 concurrent web requests should be handeled). We increased that to this high number, because of those slow requests that would otherwise block further requests.
  • The server is usually hit with up to 20 web requests at the same time
  • Each of those 20 web requests, can spawn up to 16 further threads to parallely pull data from the MySQL Webserver.
  • So in an extreme case we see up to 100 to 200 concurrent requets on the database. This is why we created the dummy case to simulate the behavior to understand where the bottleneck is.
  • "Select *" was also simplified for the dummy example, usually we just pull "date" and "value" and we use different id_security values

Is there a better way to test, if the Futures/Threads Overhead in Python is the problem or the concurrent requests on the MySQL database itself? Is it right to assume, that MySQL should easily be able to handle 100 concurrent queries that are completly in the innodb_buffer_pool, without slowing down by a factor of 5 to 10?

Update 3:

As requested:

SELECT COUNT(*) FROM information_schema.tables;: https://pastebin.com/SRmKupdC -- 392 rows

SHOW GLOBAL STATUS; https://pastebin.com/6F8kjCX6

SHOW GLOBAL VARIABLES; https://pastebin.com/r5tmFX7d

SHOW FULL PROCESSLIST; (In Idle) https://pastebin.com/Q3DhEZxV -- Nothing exciting

SHOW FULL PROCESSLIST; (With some load on webserver) https://pastebin.com/4FK1FjEC -- One query, running for only 0 seconds:

SELECT  date as d,
    value  as v
    FROM  datalake.series_security
    WHERE  id_security = 1008
      AND  date >= '1962-02-09 00:00:00'
      AND  date <= '2099-01-01 00:00:00'
      AND  id_field=100
    ORDER BY  date ASC |

STATUS https://pastebin.com/X5SL64XK -- mostly latin1

SHOW ENGINE INNODB STATUS; (Idle) https://pastebin.com/JPiqF76s --yawn.

SHOW ENGINE INNODB STATUS; (With some load on webserver) https://pastebin.com/GGsmzsXz -- essentially idle

9
  • pls show the explain of the query, the create table and the query you using after test Apr 13 at 17:16
  • 1
    I updated the question, with Explain, Create and Queries
    – SebastianB
    Apr 13 at 19:44
  • What is the value of id? The syntax implies that it is a column name.
    – Rick James
    Apr 14 at 5:19
  • 1
    I updated the question to answer your questions.
    – SebastianB
    Apr 14 at 7:45
  • 1
    I updated the question with the requested information. AWS RDS is running on an general purpose SSD (gp2). Am I right to assume, tha as the effect is also present for queries, which are in the InnoDB Buffer and no IO reads are done, SSD shouldn't have an impact?
    – SebastianB
    Apr 14 at 15:02

4 Answers 4

0

Drop the redundant indexes; they are getting in the way. (Or at least that is what I see for two of the EXPLAINs.)

  -- good
  PRIMARY KEY                 (`id_security`,`id_field`,`date`,`source`),
  -- toss as redundant:
  KEY `id_security_id_field`  (`id_security`,`id_field`),
  KEY `id_security`           (`id_security`),
  -- not useful in the current queries:
  KEY `PRIMARY_WITHOUT_SOURCE` (`id_security`,`id_field`,`date`,`value`)
  KEY `id_field` (`id_field`),
  KEY `id_source` (`source`),
  KEY `Dateindex` (`date`),

Will you really be fetching all columns? In some situations, that is an unnecessary burden on the query.

How many of the 18 million rows will you expect to fetch?

Will you be using different id_security values?

What is the value of innodb_buffer_pool_size? (I want to consider the cachability of the data, especially when doing parallel queries.)

I doubt if more than 10 parallel queries will work efficiently; there is a point of "diminishing returns".

1
  • I updated the question to answer your questions.
    – SebastianB
    Apr 14 at 7:44
0
Analysis of GLOBAL STATUS and VARIABLES:
 

Observations:

  • Version: 5.7.33-log
  • 8 GB of RAM
  • Uptime = 14d 05:11:54
  • 5.98 Queries/sec : 3.39 Questions/sec

The More Important Issues:

What is going on that would cause Max_used_connections to grow into the hundreds? When that goes about a few hundred, MySQL stumbles over itself and seems to "freeze up". It is better to avoid allowing so many connections run at the same time.

Having a large value for max_allowed_packet can risk swapping.

With long_query_time = 0, every query is "slow". Yet with slow_query_log = OFF, you are getting no information about the processing. Re-think what to do here.

Some specific suggestions:

binlog_cache_size = 64M
max_connections = 300
max_allowed_packet = 50M

Why so many rows being deleted? See if TRUNCATE would be more useful.

Unless the data will grow, the 8GB instance is overkill.

Check whether all Prepared statements are "Closed".

Details and other observations:

( Binlog_cache_disk_use / Binlog_cache_use ) = 8,557 / 13019 = 65.7% -- Spill to disk -- Increase binlog_cache_size (now 32768)

( innodb_lru_scan_depth * innodb_page_cleaners ) = 1,024 * 4 = 4,096 -- Amount of work for page cleaners every second. -- "InnoDB: page_cleaner: 1000ms intended loop took ..." may be fixable by lowering lru_scan_depth: Consider 1000 / innodb_page_cleaners (now 4). Also check for swapping.

( innodb_lru_scan_depth ) = 1,024 -- innodb_lru_scan_depth is a very poorly named variable. A better name would be innodb_free_page_target_per_buffer_pool. It is a number of pages InnoDB tries to keep free in each buffer pool instance to speed up read and page creation operations. -- "InnoDB: page_cleaner: 1000ms intended loop took ..." may be fixed by lowering lru_scan_depth

( innodb_io_capacity ) = 200 -- When flushing, use this many IOPs. -- Reads could be slugghish or spiky. Use 2000 if using SSD drive.

( Innodb_buffer_pool_pages_free / Innodb_buffer_pool_pages_total ) = 65,999 / 327680 = 20.1% -- Pct of buffer_pool currently not in use -- innodb_buffer_pool_size (now 5368709120) is bigger than necessary?

( innodb_flush_neighbors ) = innodb_flush_neighbors = 1 -- A minor optimization when writing blocks to disk. -- Use 0 for SSD drives; 1 for HDD.

( innodb_io_capacity ) = 200 -- I/O ops per second capable on disk . 100 for slow drives; 200 for spinning drives; 1000-2000 for SSDs; multiply by RAID factor. Limits write IO requests per second (IOPS). -- For starters: HDD: 200; SSD: 2000.

( innodb_adaptive_hash_index ) = innodb_adaptive_hash_index = ON -- Whether to use the adapative hash (AHI). -- ON for mostly readonly; OFF for DDL-heavy

( innodb_flush_log_at_trx_commit ) = 1 -- 1 = secure; 2 = faster -- (You decide) Use 1, along with sync_binlog (now 1)=1 for the greatest level of fault tolerance. 0 is best for speed. 2 is a compromise between 0 and 1.

( innodb_print_all_deadlocks ) = innodb_print_all_deadlocks = OFF -- Whether to log all Deadlocks. -- If you are plagued with Deadlocks, turn this on. Caution: If you have lots of deadlocks, this may write a lot to disk.

( innodb_purge_threads ) = 1 -- Number of threads to clean up history list. -- If you have a lot of writes, recommend 4 in versions 5.6 and 10.0 or later.

( max_connections ) = 2,000 -- Maximum number of connections (threads). Impacts various allocations. -- If max_connections (now 2000) is too high and various memory settings are high, you could run out of RAM.

( 176000 * max_connections ) = (176000 * 2000) / 8192M = 4.1% -- Estimate of ram usage due to the size of max_connections. -- max_connections (now 2000) is somewhat high

( max_allowed_packet ) = 999,999,488 / 8192M = 11.6% -- If you do not have large blobs (etc) to load, then decrease the value. Else decrease innodb_buffer_pool_size (now 5368709120) to make room. Swapping is terrible for performance.

( innodb_ft_result_cache_limit ) = 2,000,000,000 / 8192M = 23.3% -- Byte limit on FULLTEXT resultset. (It grows as needed.) -- Lower the setting.

( character_set_client ) = character_set_client = latin1 --

( character_set_connection ) = character_set_connection = latin1 --

( character_set_results ) = character_set_results = latin1 --

( (Com_show_create_table + Com_show_fields) / Questions ) = (306 + 226110) / 4161091 = 5.4% -- Naughty framework -- spending a lot of effort rediscovering the schema. -- Complain to the 3rd party vendor.

( local_infile ) = local_infile = ON -- local_infile (now ON) = ON is a potential security issue

( Created_tmp_disk_tables / Questions ) = 1,527,791 / 4161091 = 36.7% -- Pct of queries that needed on-disk tmp table. -- Better indexes / No blobs / etc.

( Created_tmp_disk_tables / Created_tmp_tables ) = 1,527,791 / 1840986 = 83.0% -- Percent of temp tables that spilled to disk -- Maybe increase tmp_table_size (now 16777216) and max_heap_table_size (now 16777216); improve indexes; avoid blobs, etc.

( Com_rollback / (Com_commit + Com_rollback) ) = 490,964 / (100382 + 490964) = 83.0% -- Rollback : Commit ratio -- Rollbacks are costly; change app logic

( (Com_insert + Com_update + Com_delete + Com_replace) / Com_commit ) = (168913 + 3650 + 23593 + 1066) / 100382 = 1.96 -- Statements per Commit (assuming all InnoDB) -- Low: Might help to group queries together in transactions; High: long transactions strain various things.

( ( Com_stmt_prepare - Com_stmt_close ) / ( Com_stmt_prepare + Com_stmt_close ) ) = ( 118 - 102 ) / ( 118 + 102 ) = 7.3% -- Are you closing your prepared statements? -- Add Closes.

( Com_stmt_close / Com_stmt_prepare ) = 102 / 118 = 86.4% -- Prepared statements should be Closed. -- Check whether all Prepared statements are "Closed".

( Com_admin_commands / Queries ) = 3,167,117 / 7344901 = 43.1% -- Percent of queries that are "admin" commands. -- What's going on?

( Com__biggest ) = Com__biggest = Com_admin_commands -- Which of the "Com_" metrics is biggest. -- Normally it is Com_select (now 2792924). If something else, then it may be a sloppy platform, or may be something else.

( binlog_format ) = binlog_format = MIXED -- STATEMENT/ROW/MIXED. -- ROW is preferred by 5.7 (10.3)

( slow_query_log ) = slow_query_log = OFF -- Whether to log slow queries. (5.1.12)

( Slow_queries ) = (Syncs) / 1228314 = 5.1 /sec -- Frequency (Slow queries per sec) -- Rework slow guys; improve indexes; watch disk space for slow log file

( Slow_queries / Questions ) = 6,269,663 / 4161091 = 150.7% -- Frequency (% of all queries) -- Find slow queries; check indexes.

( log_slow_slave_statements ) = log_slow_slave_statements = OFF -- (5.6.11, 5.7.1) By default, replicated statements won't show up in the slowlog; this causes them to show. -- It can be helpful in the slowlog to see writes that could be interfering with Replica reads.

( Max_used_connections ) = 626 -- High-water mark for connections -- Lots of inactive connections is OK; over 100 active connections is likely to be a problem. Max_used_connections (now 626) does not distinguish them; Threads_running (now 1) is instantaneous.

( connect_timeout ) = 86,400 -- DOS attack vulnerability if too large

( thread_stack * max_connections ) = (262144 * 2000) / 8192M = 6.1% -- Bare minimum memory allocation for max_connections. -- Lower max_connections (now 2000)

Abnormally small:

Innodb_log_writes / Innodb_log_write_requests = 0.11%

Abnormally large:

Com_purge_before_date = 12 /HR
Com_rename_table = 0.018 /HR
Com_replace_select = 1.5 /HR
Com_show_create_event = 0.0059 /HR
Com_show_create_trigger = 0.059 /HR
Com_show_profile = 0.0088 /HR
Com_show_profiles = 0.0029 /HR
Handler_delete = 114 /sec
Innodb_buffer_pool_pages_flushed / max(Questions, Queries) = 2.39
Innodb_buffer_pool_write_requests / Innodb_buffer_pool_pages_flushed = 213
Innodb_rows_deleted = 114 /sec
Max_execution_time_set = 74
Max_execution_time_set / Com_select = 0.00%
Performance_schema_file_instances_lost = 1
Prepared_stmt_count = 4
Ssl_accepts = 10,073
Ssl_default_timeout = 7,200
Ssl_finished_accepts = 10,073
Ssl_session_cache_misses = 4,432
Ssl_session_cache_overflows = 3,512
Ssl_used_session_cache_entries = 110
Ssl_verify_depth = 1.84e+19
Ssl_verify_mode = 5
Threads_connected = 339
Uptime - Uptime_since_flush_status = 1.12e+6
net_read_timeout = 86,400
net_write_timeout = 86,400
wait_timeout = 86,400

Abnormal strings:

gtid_mode = OFF_PERMISSIVE
innodb_data_home_dir = /rdsdbdata/db/innodb
innodb_fast_shutdown = 1
log_output = TABLE
log_statements_unsafe_for_binlog = OFF
optimizer_trace = enabled=off,one_line=off
optimizer_trace_features = greedy_search=on, range_optimizer=on, dynamic_range=on, repeated_subselect=on
relay_log_recovery = ON
slave_rows_search_algorithms = TABLE_SCAN,INDEX_SCAN
sql_slave_skip_counter = 0
time_zone = Europe/Amsterdam
0

Rate Per Second = RPS

Suggestions to consider for your AWS RDS Performance Group update

table_open_cache_instances=1  # from 16 - your db.t3.large has ONLY 1 Core
innodb_lru_scan_depth=100  # from 1024 to conserve 90% of CPU cycles used for function
innodb_change_buffer_max_size=50  # from 25 percent to accomodate high volume INSERTS
read_rnd_buffer_size=96*1024  # from 512K to reduce handler_read_rnd_next RPS of 734
net_buffer_length=96*1024  # from 16K to reduce number packets in/out

Observations: A) CLOSE appears to be missing when done with a connection that is remaining OPEN 24 hour according to WAIT_TIMEOUT value of 86400. B) your instance is plagued with com_rollback and handler_rollback every 3-4 seconds. innodb_print_all_deadlocks=ON would log some of the problems in your error log.

For additional assistance, view the profile for contact info and get in touch for FREE Downloadable Utility Scripts to assist with performance tuning. You have MANY more tuning opportunities for your AWS RDS db.t3.large instance.

0

We found, that it has nothing to do with MySQL but with the Global Interpreter Lock (GIL) of Python.

Due to the fact that the function read_db() /pd.read_sql(query, con) is CPU-bound and Python has the GIL, the query results are received and processed sequentially.

One solution is to use multiprocessing instead of multithreading. One can easily exchange the ThreadPoolExecutor with the ProcessPoolExecutor from concurrent.futures.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.