13

Example

#define Echo(a)  a
#define Echo(a) (a)

I realize there probably isn’t a significant difference here, but why would you ever want to include the a within parenthesis inside the macro body? How does it alter it?

14

Suppose you have

#define mul(x, y)  x * y

What happens if I say:

mul(a + 5, 6); /* a + 5 * 6 */

Now if I slighlty change the macro:

#define mul(x, y)  ((x) * (y))
mul(a + 5, 6); /* ((a + 5) * (6)) */

Remember, the arguments aren't evaluated or anything, only textual substitution is performed.

EDIT

For an explanation about having the entire macro in parentheses, see the link posted by Nate C-K.

  • 1
  • Thank you, I was just confused because in the book I am using, the way they used them seemed redundant. They had something like this foo(bar) (bar)->something, would they be nessecary here? – rubixibuc Aug 25 '11 at 7:30
  • You probably mean foo(bar) (bar)->something, and yes, they are necessary. – cnicutar Aug 25 '11 at 7:31
  • Sry to ask, but how is it nessecary there? – rubixibuc Aug 25 '11 at 7:33
  • I read the entire linked page and still dont't see how that could get parsed wrong – rubixibuc Aug 25 '11 at 7:34
1

Just for the record, I landed from Here How to fix mathematical errors while using macros and I will try to expand this Answer here to fit the Other one.

You are asking about the difference about:

#define Echo( a )  a
#define Echo( a ) ( a )

which is fine as long as you do not understand the macro it self (I am not an expert too :) ).

First of all you already (probably) know that there is Operator Precedence, so there is a huge difference of this two programs:

1):

#include <stdio.h>
#define ADD( a , b ) a + b

int main( void )
{
    auto const int a = 5;
    auto const int b = 10;

    auto const int c = ADD (  2 + a ,  2 + b );
    printf( "%d", c );
    return 0;
}

Output:

19

and:

#include <stdio.h>
#define ADD( a , b ) ( a ) + ( b )

int main( void )
{
    auto const int a = 5;
    auto const int b = 10;

    auto const int c = ADD ( a , b );
    printf( "%d", c );
    return 0;
}

Output:

15

Now lets preplace + with *:

#define ADD( a, b ) a * b

The compiler treats a * b like for example a == 5 and b == 10 which does 5 * 10.

But, when you say: ADD ( 2 + a * 5 + b ) Like here:

#include <stdio.h>
#define ADD( a , b ) ( a ) * ( b )

int main( void )
{
    auto const int a = 5;
    auto const int b = 10;

    auto const int c = ADD ( 2 + a , 5 + b );
    printf( "%d", c );
    return 0;
}

You get 105, because the operator precedence is involved and treats

2 + b * 5 + a

as

( 2 + 5 ) * ( 5 + 10 )

which is

( 7 ) * ( 15 ) == 105

But when you do:

#include <stdio.h>
#define ADD( a, b ) a * b

int main( void )
{
    auto const int a = 5;
    auto const int b = 10;

    auto const int c = ADD ( 2 + a , 5 + b );
    printf( "%d", c );
    return 0;
}

you get 37 because of

 2 + 5 * 5 + 10

which means:

2 + ( 5 * 5 ) + 10

which means:

2 + 25 + 10

Short answer, there is a big difference between:

#define ADD( a , b ) a * b

and

#define ADD( a , b ) ( a ) * ( a )
  • Why do you write auto before variables? It is totally redundant – Erik W Feb 10 '18 at 17:32
  • @ErikW Please explain me what exactly are you finding wrong with using auto in this examples? – Michi Feb 10 '18 at 17:43
  • You never need to write auto in C since all variables are auto when declared in scope (except when declared as explicit static). It is not wrong, but unnecessary. – Erik W Feb 10 '18 at 21:18
  • @ErikW I can not answer to your question as long as you do not consider that using of auto in C is wrong. – Michi Feb 10 '18 at 22:04
  • Probably would be the same question: why people do not use return in main? Just because is implicit since 99? – Michi Feb 10 '18 at 22:17

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