98

I want to create a progress bar like in the below image:

Progress Bar Example

I have no idea about creating this. Should I use HTML5 techniques?

Would you please give me some help about creating this progress bar?

17 Answers 17

237

#progressbar {
  background-color: black;
  border-radius: 13px;
  /* (height of inner div) / 2 + padding */
  padding: 3px;
}

#progressbar>div {
  background-color: orange;
  width: 40%;
  /* Adjust with JavaScript */
  height: 20px;
  border-radius: 10px;
}
<div id="progressbar">
  <div></div>
</div>

Fiddle

(EDIT: Changed Syntax highlight; changed descendant to child selector)

1
27

http://jsfiddle.net/cwZSW/1406/

#progress {
    background: #333;
    border-radius: 13px;
    height: 20px;
    width: 300px;
    padding: 3px;
}

#progress:after {
    content: '';
    display: block;
    background: orange;
    width: 50%;
    height: 100%;
    border-radius: 9px;
}
<div id="progress"></div>

4
  • 3
    Depending on your browser you need to use border-radius, -webkit-border-radius or -moz-border-radius
    – Veger
    Aug 25, 2011 at 13:31
  • kudos for taking only 3 mins to do this, you must be a super talented progress bar person! wow! Apr 8, 2015 at 11:19
  • @Daniel why thank you! It's nice when people notice! Apr 8, 2015 at 11:56
  • 7
    The only problem with this solution, is that it's really hard for JavaScript code to modify the length of the :after pseudo-element, because it isn't part of the DOM. Unless I'm missing something. Mar 30, 2016 at 15:25
25

2014 answer: Since 2014 HTML now 5 includes a <progress> element that does not need JavaScript. The percent value moves with the progress using inline content. Tested only in webkit. Hope it helps:

jsFiddle

CSS:

progress {
	display:inline-block;
	width:190px;
	height:20px;
	padding:15px 0 0 0;
	margin:0;
	background:none;
	border: 0;
	border-radius: 15px;
	text-align: left;
	position:relative;
	font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;
	font-size: 0.8em;
}
progress::-webkit-progress-bar {
	height:11px;
	width:150px;
	margin:0 auto;
	background-color: #CCC;
	border-radius: 15px;
	box-shadow:0px 0px 6px #777 inset;
}
progress::-webkit-progress-value {
	display:inline-block;
	float:left;
	height:11px;
	margin:0px -10px 0 0;
	background: #F70;
	border-radius: 15px;
	box-shadow:0px 0px 6px #777 inset;
}
progress:after {
	margin:-26px 0 0 -7px;
	padding:0;
	display:inline-block;
	float:left;
	content: attr(value) '%';
}
<progress id="progressBar" max="100" value="77"></progress>

2
  • As of 2020, supported pretty well across all browsers : caniuse.com/#feat=progress
    – frackham
    Apr 3, 2020 at 10:18
  • 2
    Isn't it somewhat unrealistic to say it "doesn't need Javascript"? I mean, the element itself is a pretty simple visual component, but if you're ever going to get any value out of it, you NEED to dynamically set the "value" property somehow. How is that going to be? I'd wager to guess Javascript. So then the question becomes whether this element actually provides that much convenience or benefit, when it doesn't really do much but present something in a very controlled manner.
    – SikoSoft
    May 23, 2020 at 20:38
7

In modern browsers you could use a CSS3 & HTML5 progress Element!

progress {
  width: 40%;
  display: block; /* default: inline-block */
  margin: 2em auto;
  padding: 3px;
  border: 0 none;
  background: #444;
  border-radius: 14px;
}
progress::-moz-progress-bar {
  border-radius: 12px;
  background: orange;

}
/* webkit */
@media screen and (-webkit-min-device-pixel-ratio:0) {
  progress {
    height: 25px;
  }
}
progress::-webkit-progress-bar {
    background: transparent;
}  
progress::-webkit-progress-value {  
  border-radius: 12px;
  background: orange;
} 
<progress max="100" value="40"></progress>

6

Same as @RoToRa's answer, with a some slight adjustments (correct colors and dimensions):

body {
  background-color: #636363;
  padding: 1em;
}

#progressbar {
  background-color: #20201F;
  border-radius: 20px; /* (heightOfInnerDiv / 2) + padding */
  padding: 4px;
}

#progressbar>div {
  background-color: #F7901E;
  width: 48%;
  /* Adjust with JavaScript */
  height: 16px;
  border-radius: 10px;
}
<div id="progressbar">
  <div></div>
</div>

Here's the fiddle: jsFiddle

And here's what it looks like: jsFiddle-screenshot

5

I like this one:

very slick with only this as HTML and the rest CSS3 that is backwards compatible (although it will have less eyecandy)

Edit Added code below, but taken directly from the page above, all credit to that author

.meter {
  height: 20px;
  /* Can be anything */
  position: relative;
  background: #555;
  -moz-border-radius: 25px;
  -webkit-border-radius: 25px;
  border-radius: 25px;
  padding: 10px;
  -webkit-box-shadow: inset 0 -1px 1px rgba(255, 255, 255, 0.3);
  -moz-box-shadow: inset 0 -1px 1px rgba(255, 255, 255, 0.3);
  box-shadow: inset 0 -1px 1px rgba(255, 255, 255, 0.3);
}

.meter>span {
  display: block;
  height: 100%;
  -webkit-border-top-right-radius: 8px;
  -webkit-border-bottom-right-radius: 8px;
  -moz-border-radius-topright: 8px;
  -moz-border-radius-bottomright: 8px;
  border-top-right-radius: 8px;
  border-bottom-right-radius: 8px;
  -webkit-border-top-left-radius: 20px;
  -webkit-border-bottom-left-radius: 20px;
  -moz-border-radius-topleft: 20px;
  -moz-border-radius-bottomleft: 20px;
  border-top-left-radius: 20px;
  border-bottom-left-radius: 20px;
  background-color: #f1a165;
  background-image: -webkit-gradient(linear, left top, left bottom, color-stop(0, #f1a165), color-stop(1, #f36d0a));
  background-image: -webkit-linear-gradient(top, #f1a165, #f36d0a);
  background-image: -moz-linear-gradient(top, #f1a165, #f36d0a);
  background-image: -ms-linear-gradient(top, #f1a165, #f36d0a);
  background-image: -o-linear-gradient(top, #f1a165, #f36d0a);
  -webkit-box-shadow: inset 0 2px 9px rgba(255, 255, 255, 0.3), inset 0 -2px 6px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.4);
  -moz-box-shadow: inset 0 2px 9px rgba(255, 255, 255, 0.3), inset 0 -2px 6px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.4);
  position: relative;
  overflow: hidden;
}
<div class="meter">
  <span style="width: 33%"></span>
  <!-- I use my viewmodel in MVC to calculate the progress and then use @Model.progress to place it in my HTML with Razor -->
</div>

2
  • 2
    Note that link-only answers are discouraged, SO answers should be the end-point of a search for a solution (vs. yet another stopover of references, which tend to get stale over time). Please consider adding a stand-alone synopsis here, keeping the link as a reference.
    – kleopatra
    Sep 5, 2013 at 8:36
  • @kleopatra, thank you for keeping the website usable. I know link only (certainly to sites like jsfiddle) are discouraged. I will add the code I used. Sep 5, 2013 at 8:45
5

Progress Bar without nested divs... for every element where the css linear-gradient works.

Here the JSFiddle http://jsfiddle.net/oj1L3y6t/2/

function show_progress(i) {
  var progress1 = i;
  var progress2 = progress1 + 1;
  var progress3 = progress1 + 2;

  var magic = "linear-gradient(to right, #FFC2CE " + progress1 + "% ,red " + progress2 + "% , #FFFFFF " + progress3 + "%)";
  document.getElementById("progress-0").style.background = magic;

  var magic = "linear-gradient(to right, lightblue " + progress1 + "% , lightgreen " + progress2 + "%)";
  document.getElementById("progress-1").style.background = magic;

  var magic = "linear-gradient(to right, lightblue " + progress1 + "% , #FFFFFF 100%)";
  document.getElementById("progress-2").style.background = magic;

  var magic = "linear-gradient(#FFC2CE " + progress1 + "% ,red " + progress2 + "% , #FFFFFF " + progress3 + "%)";
  document.getElementById("progress-3").style.background = magic;
}

function timeout() {
  t = setTimeout(function() {
    show_progress(t)
    timeout();
  }, 50);
  if (t == 78) {
    clearTimeout(t);
  }
  console.log(t);
}

timeout();
#progress-0 {
  border: 1px solid black;
  width: 500px;
  background: #999;
  text-align: center;
}

#progress-1 {
  border: 1px solid black;
  width: 500px;
  background: #999;
  text-align: center;
  margin-top: 10px;
  border-radius: 10px;
}

#progress-2 {
  border: 1px solid black;
  width: 500px;
  background: #999;
  text-align: center;
  margin-top: 10px;
}

#progress-3 {
  border: 1px solid black;
  width: 100px;
  height: 100px;
  background: #999;
  line-height: 100px;
  text-align: center;
  margin-top: 10px;
  border-radius: 200px;
}
<div id="progress-0">Loading</div>
<input id="progress-1" value="Loading"></input>
<button id="progress-2">Loading</button>
<p id="progress-3">Loading</p>

2

Create an element which shows the left part of the bar (the round part), also create an element for the right part. For the actual progress bar, create a third element with a repeating background and a width which depends on the actual progress. Put it all on top of the background image (containing the empty progress bar).

But I suppose you already knew that...

Edit: When creating a progress bar which do not use textual backgrounds. You can use the border-radius to get the round effect, as shown by Rikudo Sennin and RoToRa!

0
1

.loading {
  position: relative;
  width: 50%;
  height: 200px;
  border: 1px solid rgba(160, 160, 164, 0.2);
  background-color: rgba(160, 160, 164, 0.2);
  border-radius: 3px;
}

span.loader {
  position: absolute;
  top: 40%;
  left: 10%;
  width: 250px;
  height: 20px;
  border-radius: 8px;
  border: 2px solid rgba(160, 160, 164, 0.8);
  padding: 0;
}

span.loader span.innerLoad {
  text-align: center;
  width: 140px;
  font-size: 15px;
  font-stretch: extra-expanded;
  color: #2A00FF;
  padding: 1px 18px 3px 80px;
  border-radius: 8px;
  background: rgb(250, 198, 149);
  background: -moz-linear-gradient(left, rgba(250, 198, 149, 1) 0%, rgba(245, 171, 102, 1) 47%, rgba(239, 141, 49, 1) 100%);
  background: -webkit-gradient(linear, left top, right top, color-stop(0%, rgba(250, 198, 149, 1)), color-stop(47%, rgba(245, 171, 102, 1)), color-stop(100%, rgba(239, 141, 49, 1)));
  background: -webkit-linear-gradient(left, rgba(250, 198, 149, 1) 0%, rgba(245, 171, 102, 1) 47%, rgba(239, 141, 49, 1) 100%);
  background: -o-linear-gradient(left, rgba(250, 198, 149, 1) 0%, rgba(245, 171, 102, 1) 47%, rgba(239, 141, 49, 1) 100%);
  background: -ms-linear-gradient(left, rgba(250, 198, 149, 1) 0%, rgba(245, 171, 102, 1) 47%, rgba(239, 141, 49, 1) 100%);
  background: linear-gradient(to right, rgba(250, 198, 149, 1) 0%, rgba(245, 171, 102, 1) 47%, rgba(239, 141, 49, 1) 100%);
  filter: progid:DXImageTransform.Microsoft.gradient( startColorstr='#fac695', endColorstr='#ef8d31', GradientType=1);
}
<div class="loading">
  <span class="loader">
     	<span class="innerLoad">Loading...</span>
  </span>
</div>

1
    .black-strip
{   width:100%;
    height: 30px;       
    background-color:black; 
}

.green-strip
{   width:0%;           
    height: 30px;       
    background-color:lime;
    animation-name: progress-bar;           
    animation-duration: 4s;  
    animation-iteration-count: infinite; 
}

@keyframes progress-bar { 
    from{width:0%} 
    to{width:100%} 
}

    <div class="black-strip">
        <div class="green-strip">
        </div>
   </div>
0

If you wish to have a progress bar without adding some code PACE can be an awesome tool for you.

Just include pace.js and a CSS theme of your choice, and you get a beautiful progress indicator for your page load and AJAX navigation. Best thing with PACE is the auto detection of progress.

It contains various themes and color schemes as well.

Worth a try.

0
.bar {
background - color: blue;
height: 40 px;
width: 40 px;
border - style: solid;
border - right - width: 1300 px;
border - radius: 40 px;
animation - name: Load;
animation - duration: 11 s;
position: relative;
animation - iteration - count: 1;
animation - fill - mode: forwards;
}

@keyframes Load {
100 % {
    width: 1300 px;border - right - width: 5;
}
2
  • this is what I used... for a middle school coding project, it;s not the prettiest but it works Mar 29, 2017 at 18:41
  • 1
    Not only is it not the prettiest, it's also not valid and won't work. CSS properties do not have spaces in them. For example background - color: blue; needs to be background-color: blue;
    – Matijs
    Mar 29, 2017 at 18:51
0

Using setInterval.

var totalelem = document.getElementById("total");
var progresselem = document.getElementById("progress");
var interval = setInterval(function(){
    if(progresselem.clientWidth>=totalelem.clientWidth)
    {
        clearInterval(interval);
        return;
    }
    progresselem.style.width = progresselem.offsetWidth+1+"px";
},10)
.outer
{
    width: 200px;
    height: 15px;
    background: red;
}
.inner
{
    width: 0px;
    height: 15px;
    background: green;
}
<div id="total" class="outer">
    <div id="progress" class="inner"></div>
</div>

Using CSS Transtitions.

function loading()
{
    document.getElementById("progress").style.width="200px";
}
.outer
{
    width: 200px;
    height: 15px;
    background: red;
}
.inner
{
    width: 0px;
    height: 15px;
    background: green;
    -webkit-transition:width 3s linear;
    transition: width 3s linear;
}
<div id="total" class="outer">
    <div id="progress" class="inner"></div>
</div>
<button id="load" onclick="loading()">Load</button>

0

There is a tutorial for creating an HTML5 progress bar here. If you don't want to use HTML5 methods or you are looking for an all-browser solution, try this code:

<div style="width: 150px; height: 25px; background-color: #dbdbdb;">
  <div style="height: 25px; width:87%; background-color: gold">&nbsp;</div>
</div>

You can change the color GOLD to any progress bar color and #dbdbdb to the background-color of your progress bar.

0
0
<!DOCTYPE html>
<html lang="pt-BR">
    <head>
        <meta chatset="UTF-8" />
        <title>CSS Progress Bar</title>
        
        <style>
            .wrapper {
                width: 500px;
            }
            
            .progress-bar {
                width: 100%;
                background-color: #e0e0e0;
                padding: 3px;
                border-radius: 3px;
                box-shadow: inset 0 1px 3px rgba(0, 0, 0, .2);
            }
            
            .progress-bar-fill {
                display: block;
                height: 22px;
                background-color: #659cef;
                border-radius: 3px;
                
                transition: width 500ms ease-in-out;
            }
        </style>
        
    </head>
    <body>
        <div class="wrapper">
            <div class="progress-bar">
                <span class="progress-bar-fill" style="width: 70%;"></span>
            </div>
        </div>
    </body>
</html>
0

        .progress > progress{
            height: 30px;
            width: 320px;
        }
        .progress::before{
            content: '';
            position: absolute;
            background: rgb(17, 138, 17);
            height: 20px;
            top: 343px;
            animation: progressAnimate 3s linear infinite;
        }
        @keyframes progressAnimate{
            0%{
                width: 0;
            }
            10%{
                width: 10px;
            }
            20%{
                width: 12px;
            }
            50%{
                width: 18px;
            }
            100%{
                width: 320px;
            }
        }
                @-webkit-keyframes progressAnimate{
            0%{
                width: 0;
            }
            10%{
                width: 10px;
            }
            20%{
                width: 12px;
            }
            50%{
                width: 18px;
            }
            100%{
                width: 320px;
            }
        }
        .progress::after{
            content: '';
            position: absolute;
            background: linear-gradient(to right,transparent,#fff,transparent);
            height: 50px;
            width: 98px;
            left: 500px;
            top: 343px;
            animation: linearAnimate 3s linear infinite;
        }
        @keyframes linearAnimate{
            0%{
                left: 400px;
            }
            10%{
                left: 549px;
            }
            20%{
                left: 590px;
            }
            50%{
                left: 599px;
            }
            100%{
                left: 600px;
            }
        }
                @-webkit-keyframes linearAnimate{
            0%{
                left: 400px;
            }
            10%{
                left: 549px;
            }
            20%{
                left: 590px;
            }
            50%{
                left: 599px;
            }
            100%{
                left: 600px;
            }
        }
<div class="progress"><progress max="100" value="0">0%</progress></div><br>

windows 10 progress bar

-4

Why can't you just Create Multiple pictures for each part of the status bar? If it's a third just show a third of the status bar... it's very simple. You could probably figure out how to change it to the next picture based of input with the form tag. Here's my part of the code, you have to figure out the form stuff later

<form> <!--(extra code)-->
<!--first progress bar:-->
<img src="directory"></img>
<!--second progress bar:-->
<img src="directory"></img>
<!--et caetera...-->
</form>

Now it seems simple, doesn't it?

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