94

I have the classic case of trying to remove an item from a collection while enumerating it in a loop:

List<int> myIntCollection = new List<int>();
myIntCollection.Add(42);
myIntCollection.Add(12);
myIntCollection.Add(96);
myIntCollection.Add(25);

foreach (int i in myIntCollection)
{
    if (i == 42)
        myIntCollection.Remove(96);    // The error is here.
    if (i == 25)
        myIntCollection.Remove(42);    // The error is here.
}

At the beginning of the iteration after a change takes place, an InvalidOperationException is thrown, because enumerators don’t like when the underlying collection changes.

I need to make changes to the collection while iterating. There are many patterns that can be used to avoid this, but none of them seems to have a good solution:

  1. Do not delete inside this loop, instead keep a separate “Delete List”, that you process after the main loop.

    This is normally a good solution, but in my case, I need the item to be gone instantly as “waiting” till after the main loop to really delete the item changes the logic flow of my code.

  2. Instead of deleting the item, simply set a flag on the item and mark it as inactive. Then add the functionality of pattern 1 to clean up the list.

    This would work for all of my needs, but it means that a lot of code will have to change in order to check the inactive flag every time an item is accessed. This is far too much administration for my liking.

  3. Somehow incorporate the ideas of pattern 2 in a class that derives from List<T>. This Superlist will handle the inactive flag, the deletion of objects after the fact and also will not expose items marked as inactive to enumeration consumers. Basically, it just encapsulates all the ideas of pattern 2 (and subsequently pattern 1).

    Does a class like this exist? Does anyone have code for this? Or is there a better way?

  4. I’ve been told that accessing myIntCollection.ToArray() instead of myIntCollection will solve the problem and allow me to delete inside the loop.

    This seems like a bad design pattern to me, or maybe it’s fine?

Details:

  • The list will contain many items and I will be removing only some of them.

  • Inside the loop, I will be doing all sorts of processes, adding, removing etc., so the solution needs to be fairly generic.

  • The item that I need to delete may not be the current item in the loop. For example, I may be on item 10 of a 30 item loop and need to remove item 6 or item 26. Walking backwards through the array will no longer work because of this. ;o(

3
  • Possible useful info for someone else: Avoid Collection has been modified error (an encapsulation of pattern 1) Aug 25 '11 at 15:54
  • A side note: Lists spare much time (generally O(N), where N is the length of the list) moving the values. If efficient random access is really needed, it is possible to achieve deletes in O(log N), using a balanced binary tree holding the number of nodes in the subtree whose root it is. It is a BST whose key (the index in the sequence) is implied.
    – Palec
    Mar 1 '16 at 14:29
  • Please see the answer:stackoverflow.com/questions/7193294/…
    – Dabbas
    Apr 20 '16 at 9:14

10 Answers 10

205

The best solution is usually to use the RemoveAll() method:

myList.RemoveAll(x => x.SomeProp == "SomeValue");

Or, if you need certain elements removed:

MyListType[] elems = new[] { elem1, elem2 };
myList.RemoveAll(x => elems.Contains(x));

This assume that your loop is solely intended for removal purposes, of course. If you do need to additional processing, then the best method is usually to use a for or while loop, since then you're not using an enumerator:

for (int i = myList.Count - 1; i >= 0; i--)
{
    // Do processing here, then...
    if (shouldRemoveCondition)
    {
        myList.RemoveAt(i);
    }
}

Going backwards ensures that you don't skip any elements.

Response to Edit:

If you're going to have seemingly arbitrary elements removed, the easiest method might be to just keep track of the elements you want to remove, and then remove them all at once after. Something like this:

List<int> toRemove = new List<int>();
foreach (var elem in myList)
{
    // Do some stuff

    // Check for removal
    if (needToRemoveAnElement)
    {
        toRemove.Add(elem);
    }
}

// Remove everything here
myList.RemoveAll(x => toRemove.Contains(x));
2
  • Regarding your response: I need to remove the items instantly during the processing of that item not after the whole loop has been processed. The solution I'm using is to NULL any items that I want to delete instantly and delete them afterwards. This is not an ideal solution as I have to check for NULL all over the place, but it DOES work.
    – John Stock
    Aug 27 '11 at 14:34
  • Wondering If 'elem' is not an int , then we can't use RemoveAll that way it is present on the edited response code.
    – User M
    Jun 7 '19 at 19:48
27

If you must both enumerate a List<T> and remove from it then I suggest simply using a while loop instead of a foreach

var index = 0;
while (index < myList.Count) {
  if (someCondition(myList[index])) {
    myList.RemoveAt(index);
  } else {
    index++;
  }
}
1
  • This should be the accepted answer in my opinion. This allows you to consider the rest of the items in your list, without re-iterating a shortlist of items to be removed.
    – Slvrfn
    Oct 17 '18 at 3:05
13

I know this post is old, but I thought I'd share what worked for me.

Create a copy of the list for enumerating, and then in the for each loop, you can process on the copied values, and remove/add/whatever with the source list.

private void ProcessAndRemove(IList<Item> list)
{
    foreach (var item in list.ToList())
    {
        if (item.DeterminingFactor > 10)
        {
            list.Remove(item);
        }
    }
}
3
  • Great idea on the ".ToList()"! Simple head-slapper, and also works in cases where you're not using the stock "Remove...()" meths directly.
    – galaxis
    Jul 17 '15 at 16:36
  • 2
    Very inefficient though.
    – nawfal
    Jul 26 '20 at 6:06
  • How inefficient is "very inefficient"? Are you just referring to the extra space that creating a new list takes up? If space isn't a concern then it seems like a very intuitive straight forward answer. Apr 9 at 20:37
8

When you need to iterate through a list and might modify it during the loop then you are better off using a for loop:

for (int i = 0; i < myIntCollection.Count; i++)
{
    if (myIntCollection[i] == 42)
    {
        myIntCollection.Remove(i);
        i--;
    }
}

Of course you must be careful, for example I decrement i whenever an item is removed as otherwise we will skip entries (an alternative is to go backwards though the list).

If you have Linq then you should just use RemoveAll as dlev has suggested.

3
  • Only works when you are removing the current element though. If you are removing an arbitrary element, you will need to check whether its index was at/before or after the current index to decide whether to --i.
    – CompuChip
    Mar 1 '16 at 11:03
  • The original question did not make it clear that deletion of other elements than the current one must be supported, @CompuChip. This answer has not changed since it was clarified.
    – Palec
    Mar 1 '16 at 11:06
  • @Palec, I understand, hence my comment.
    – CompuChip
    Mar 1 '16 at 11:07
5

As you enumerate the list, add the one you want to KEEP to a new list. Afterward, assign the new list to the myIntCollection

List<int> myIntCollection=new List<int>();
myIntCollection.Add(42);
List<int> newCollection=new List<int>(myIntCollection.Count);

foreach(int i in myIntCollection)
{
    if (i want to delete this)
        ///
    else
        newCollection.Add(i);
}
myIntCollection = newCollection;
2

Let's add you code:

List<int> myIntCollection=new List<int>();
myIntCollection.Add(42);
myIntCollection.Add(12);
myIntCollection.Add(96);
myIntCollection.Add(25);

If you want to change the list while you're in a foreach, you must type .ToList()

foreach(int i in myIntCollection.ToList())
{
    if (i == 42)
       myIntCollection.Remove(96);
    if (i == 25)
       myIntCollection.Remove(42);
}
0
1

For those it may help, I wrote this Extension method to remove items matching the predicate and return the list of removed items.

    public static IList<T> RemoveAllKeepRemoved<T>(this IList<T> source, Predicate<T> predicate)
    {
        IList<T> removed = new List<T>();
        for (int i = source.Count - 1; i >= 0; i--)
        {
            T item = source[i];
            if (predicate(item))
            {
                removed.Add(item);
                source.RemoveAt(i);
            }
        }
        return removed;
    }
0

How about

int[] tmp = new int[myIntCollection.Count ()];
myIntCollection.CopyTo(tmp);
foreach(int i in tmp)
{
    myIntCollection.Remove(42); //The error is no longer here.
}
1
  • In current C#, it can be rewritten as foreach (int i in myIntCollection.ToArray()) { myIntCollection.Remove(42); } for any enumerable, and List<T> specifically supports this method even in .NET 2.0.
    – Palec
    Mar 1 '16 at 11:11
0

If you're interested in high performance, you can use two lists. The following minimises garbage collection, maximises memory locality and never actually removes an item from a list, which is very inefficient if it's not the last item.

private void RemoveItems()
{
    _newList.Clear();

    foreach (var item in _list)
    {
        item.Process();
        if (!item.NeedsRemoving())
            _newList.Add(item);
    }

    var swap = _list;
    _list = _newList;
    _newList = swap;
}
0

Just figured I'll share my solution to a similar problem where i needed to remove items from a list while processing them.

So basically "foreach" that will remove the item from the list after it has been iterated.

My test:

var list = new List<TempLoopDto>();
list.Add(new TempLoopDto("Test1"));
list.Add(new TempLoopDto("Test2"));
list.Add(new TempLoopDto("Test3"));
list.Add(new TempLoopDto("Test4"));

list.PopForEach((item) =>
{
    Console.WriteLine($"Process {item.Name}");
});

Assert.That(list.Count, Is.EqualTo(0));

I solved this with a extension method "PopForEach" that will perform a action and then remove the item from the list.

public static class ListExtensions
{
    public static void PopForEach<T>(this List<T> list, Action<T> action)
    {
        var index = 0;
        while (index < list.Count) {
            action(list[index]);
            list.RemoveAt(index);
        }
    }
}

Hope this can be helpful to any one.

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