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I want to verify if i am doing things right, the question is : The function random, without arguments, assumed to be imported, returns a random real of the interval [0,1[. Write a function init(N) taking as input a strictly positive integer, and returning a grid (NxN) (in the form of a list of lists), each cell containing a cell with a value of True with a probability of 1/3. For example:

init(4) => [[True, False, False, False],[False, False, True, True],[False,False,False,False],[True,False, True, False]]

from random import random
def init(N):
    return [ [True if random()<1/3 else False  for j in range(N)] for i in range (N) ]
print(init(4))

I am confused is the probablity 1/3 means that the generated random value is less than 1/3 or it is referring to a weighted probability such the one used in random.choice

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  • From what I understand, both approaches are the same. You can either say that if the result of random is <1/2 then it is True, else it is False, and tweak the probabilities for the result to be <1/2 only 1/3 of the time OR say that the result will be distributed normally, but that True will be returned only if the result is <1/3. The easy way is the second, and it is what's been done here, which works greatly btw! Apr 22 at 9:59
  • Thank you, "You can either say that if the result of random is <1/2 then it is True, else it is False, and tweak the probabilities for the result to be <1/2 only 1/3 of the time". Can you explain more why should I consider 0.5 as a threshold. Apr 22 at 13:19
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    random() returns a float in this interval [0;1). Thus, because you have two outcomes, you could consider the threshold to be 0.5 (but it would not really matter). The main point is that you could "weigh" the probabilities in order for the result to effectively be <0.5 (or the threshold you've determined) only 1/3 of the time. This would be way more complex than what you've done, and frankly I wouldn't know why someone would do that. To be more precise you chose a particular case, putting the threshold at 0.333, which allows you to not touch the underlying distribution. Apr 22 at 13:29

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