I have a development database that re-deploy frequently from a Visual Studio Database project (via a TFS Auto Build).

Sometimes when I run my build I get this error:

ALTER DATABASE failed because a lock could not be placed on database 'MyDB'. Try again later.  
ALTER DATABASE statement failed.  
Cannot drop database "MyDB" because it is currently in use.  

I tried this:

ALTER DATABASE MyDB SET RESTRICTED_USER WITH ROLLBACK IMMEDIATE

but I still cannot drop the database. (My guess is that most of the developers have dbo access.)

I can manually run SP_WHO and start killing connections, but I need an automatic way to do this in the auto build. (Though this time my connection is the only one on the db I am trying to drop.)

Is there a script that can drop my database regardless of who is connected?

11 Answers 11

up vote 423 down vote accepted
+50

Updated

For MS SQL Server 2012 and above

USE [master];

DECLARE @kill varchar(8000) = '';  
SELECT @kill = @kill + 'kill ' + CONVERT(varchar(5), session_id) + ';'  
FROM sys.dm_exec_sessions
WHERE database_id  = db_id('MyDB')

EXEC(@kill);

For MS SQL Server 2000, 2005, 2008

USE master;

DECLARE @kill varchar(8000); SET @kill = '';  
SELECT @kill = @kill + 'kill ' + CONVERT(varchar(5), spid) + ';'  
FROM master..sysprocesses  
WHERE dbid = db_id('MyDB')

EXEC(@kill); 
  • 23
    This is the better answer of the two; avoids taking the database offline and the accepted answer doesn't always work (sometimes it can't roll everything back). – Mark Henderson May 1 '13 at 21:50
  • 3
    Such a nice answer for aggregating kill statements all together. I would use a cursor to kill each process, which of course is not efficient at all. The technique used in this answer is brilliant. – Saeed Neamati Mar 2 '14 at 6:27
  • I agree with Mark. This method should be the accepted answer as it is significantly more elegant and less impacting for the databases. – Austin S. Nov 21 '14 at 1:11
  • 1
    good one and quick. Only problem could be system spid so u can add WHERE dbid = db_id('My_db') and spid > 50 – Saurabh Sinha Nov 25 '14 at 19:17
  • 1
    @FrenkyB You need to change the database context before run script. For ex.: USE [Master] – AlexK Mar 12 '15 at 11:58
USE master
GO
ALTER DATABASE database_name
SET OFFLINE WITH ROLLBACK IMMEDIATE
GO

Ref: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb522682%28v=sql.105%29.aspx

  • 8
    Oddly enough it was USE master that was the key. I was trying to drop the db while connected to it (Duh!). Thanks! – Vaccano Aug 25 '11 at 22:02
  • 7
    If you use SET OFFLINE you have to manually delete the db files. – mattalxndr Oct 13 '13 at 18:40
  • 5
    Wouldn't alter database YourDatabaseName set SINGLE_USER with rollback immediate be better? If you set it to OFFLINE (as @mattalxndr states) the files will be left on disk, but with SINGLE_USER your connection will be left as the only one, and drop database YourDatabaseName will still remove the files. – Keith Dec 12 '13 at 15:11
  • 1
    @Keith in the script, you aren't connected to the DB, so it's not "your connection" but some other that will be left. Immediately after the set offline, you can issue set online to avoid the leftover files problem (yes, there's a race condition possibility). – ivan_pozdeev Aug 8 '14 at 11:55
  • 2
    Thanks! I didn't realize that some tab with sql statement in SQL Management Studio, executed earlier on this database, was causing my db to be reported in use. Use master, and go, made everything work! – eythort Oct 6 '14 at 12:22

You can get the script that SSMS provides by doing the following:

  1. Right-click on a database in SSMS and choose delete
  2. In the dialog, check the checkbox for "Close existing connections."
  3. Click the Script button at the top of the dialog.

The script will look something like this:

USE [master]
GO
ALTER DATABASE [YourDatabaseName] SET  SINGLE_USER WITH ROLLBACK IMMEDIATE
GO
USE [master]
GO
DROP DATABASE [YourDatabaseName]
GO
  • 1
    I will not recommend taking databse in single user mode for any of users as this can cause you loose current connection to some application user and unnecesarry trouble to find those users and kill same or some times u have to restart sql server if connections to db are so frequent. – Saurabh Sinha Nov 25 '14 at 19:16

Little known: the GO sql statement can take an integer for the number of times to repeat previous command.

So if you:

ALTER DATABASE [DATABASENAME] SET SINGLE_USER
GO

Then:

USE [DATABASENAME]
GO 2000

This will repeat the USE command 2000 times, force deadlock on all other connections, and take ownership of the single connection. (Giving your query window sole access to do as you wish.)

  • GO is not a TSQL command but a special command only recognized by the sqlcmd and osql utilities and SSMS. – diceless Aug 9 at 14:30

To my experience, using SINGLE_USER helps most of the times, however, one should be careful: I have experienced occasions in which between the time I start the SINGLE_USER command and the time it is finished... apparently another 'user' had gotten the SINGLE_USER access, not me. If that happens, you're in for a tough job trying to get the access to the database back (in my case, it was a specific service running for a software with SQL databases that got hold of the SINGLE_USER access before I did). What I think should be the most reliable way (can't vouch for it, but it is what I will test in the days to come), is actually: - stop services that may interfere with your access (if there are any) - use the 'kill' script above to close all connections - set the database to single_user immediately after that - then do the restore

How does that sound ?

  • If the SINGLE_USER command is in the same batch as your (scripted) restore command -- not separated by a GO statement! -- then no other process can grab single user access, in my experience. However, I was caught tonight because my nightly scheduled job of set-single-user;restore;set-multi-user blew up. another process had exclusive file access to my bak file (smh) and therefore the restore failed, followed by the SET MULTI_USER failing ... meaning when I got called in the middle of the night to clean up the blood, someone else had SINGLE_USER access and had to be killed. – Ross Presser Oct 20 '16 at 9:58

Matthew's supremely efficient script updated to use the dm_exec_sessions DMV, replacing the deprecated sysprocesses system table:

USE [master];
GO

DECLARE @Kill VARCHAR(8000) = '';

SELECT
    @Kill = @Kill + 'kill ' + CONVERT(VARCHAR(5), session_id) + ';'
FROM
    sys.dm_exec_sessions
WHERE
    database_id = DB_ID('<YourDB>');

EXEC sys.sp_executesql @Kill;

Alternative using WHILE loop (if you want to process any other operations per execution):

USE [master];
GO

DECLARE @DatabaseID SMALLINT = DB_ID(N'<YourDB>');    
DECLARE @SQL NVARCHAR(10);

WHILE EXISTS ( SELECT
                1
               FROM
                sys.dm_exec_sessions
               WHERE
                database_id = @DatabaseID )    
    BEGIN;
        SET @SQL = (
                    SELECT TOP 1
                        N'kill ' + CAST(session_id AS NVARCHAR(5)) + ';'
                    FROM
                        sys.dm_exec_sessions
                    WHERE
                        database_id = @DatabaseID
                   );
        EXEC sys.sp_executesql @SQL;
    END;

You should be careful about exceptions during killing processes. So you may use this script:

USE master;
GO
 DECLARE @kill varchar(max) = '';
 SELECT @kill = @kill + 'BEGIN TRY KILL ' + CONVERT(varchar(5), spid) + ';' + ' END TRY BEGIN CATCH END CATCH ;' FROM master..sysprocesses 
EXEC (@kill)

@AlexK wrote a great answer. I just want to add my two cents. The code below is entirely based on @AlexK's answer, the difference is that you can specify the user and a time since the last batch was executed (note that the code uses sys.dm_exec_sessions instead of master..sysprocess):

DECLARE @kill varchar(8000);
set @kill =''
select @kill = @kill + 'kill ' +  CONVERT(varchar(5), session_id) + ';' from sys.dm_exec_sessions 
where login_name = 'usrDBTest'
and datediff(hh,login_time,getdate()) > 1
--and session_id in (311,266)    
exec(@kill)

In this example only the process of the user usrDBTest which the last batch was executed more than 1 hour ago will be killed.

You can use Cursor like that:

USE master
GO

DECLARE @SQL AS VARCHAR(255)
DECLARE @SPID AS SMALLINT
DECLARE @Database AS VARCHAR(500)
SET @Database = 'AdventureWorks2016CTP3'

DECLARE Murderer CURSOR FOR
SELECT spid FROM sys.sysprocesses WHERE DB_NAME(dbid) = @Database

OPEN Murderer

FETCH NEXT FROM Murderer INTO @SPID
WHILE @@FETCH_STATUS = 0

    BEGIN
    SET @SQL = 'Kill ' + CAST(@SPID AS VARCHAR(10)) + ';'
    EXEC (@SQL)
    PRINT  ' Process ' + CAST(@SPID AS VARCHAR(10)) +' has been killed'
    FETCH NEXT FROM Murderer INTO @SPID
    END 

CLOSE Murderer
DEALLOCATE Murderer

I wrote about that in my blog here: http://www.pigeonsql.com/single-post/2016/12/13/Kill-all-connections-on-DB-by-Cursor

SELECT
    spid,
    sp.[status],
    loginame [Login],
    hostname, 
    blocked BlkBy,
    sd.name DBName, 
    cmd Command,
    cpu CPUTime,
    memusage Memory,
    physical_io DiskIO,
    lastwaittype LastWaitType,
    [program_name] ProgramName,
    last_batch LastBatch,
    login_time LoginTime,
    'kill ' + CAST(spid as varchar(10)) as 'Kill Command'
FROM master.dbo.sysprocesses sp 
JOIN master.dbo.sysdatabases sd ON sp.dbid = sd.dbid
WHERE sd.name NOT IN ('master', 'model', 'msdb') 
--AND sd.name = 'db_name' 
--AND hostname like 'hostname1%' 
--AND loginame like 'username1%'
ORDER BY spid

/* If a service connects continously. You can automatically execute kill process then run your script:
DECLARE @sqlcommand nvarchar (500)
SELECT @sqlcommand = 'kill ' + CAST(spid as varchar(10))
FROM master.dbo.sysprocesses sp 
JOIN master.dbo.sysdatabases sd ON sp.dbid = sd.dbid
WHERE sd.name NOT IN ('master', 'model', 'msdb') 
--AND sd.name = 'db_name' 
--AND hostname like 'hostname1%' 
--AND loginame like 'username1%'
--SELECT @sqlcommand
EXEC sp_executesql @sqlcommand
*/

I have tested successfully with simple code below

USE [master]
GO
ALTER DATABASE [YourDatabaseName] SET SINGLE_USER WITH ROLLBACK IMMEDIATE
GO
  • 2
    I had issues with set SINGLE_USER when there already was a single active connection. – ivan_pozdeev Aug 8 '14 at 11:49

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