3

I'm having speed issues multiplying the transpose of a sparse matrix with a column vector.

In my code the matrix A is

501×501 SparseMatrixCSC{Float64, Integer} with 1501 stored entries:

⠻⣦⡀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⢸

⠀⠈⠻⣦⡀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⢸

⠀⠀⠀⠈⠻⣦⡀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⢸

⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠈⠻⣦⡀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⢸

⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠈⠻⣦⡀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⢸

⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠈⠻⣦⡀⠀⠀⠀⠀⢸

⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠈⠻⣦⡀⠀⠀⢸

⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠈⠻⣦⡀⢸

⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⡀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠈⠻⣾

These are the results I get from the multiplication with f0 = rand(Float64,501,1):

Method 1

A_tr = transpose(A)

@benchmark A_tr*f

BenchmarkTools.Trial: 10000 samples with 1 evaluation.

Range (min … max): 350.083 μs … 9.066 ms ┊ GC (min … max): 0.00% … 95.44%

Time (median): 361.208 μs ┊ GC (median): 0.00%

Time (mean ± σ): 380.269 μs ± 355.997 μs ┊ GC (mean ± σ): 4.06% ± 4.15%

Memory estimate: 218.70 KiB, allocs estimate: 11736.

Method 2

A_tr = Matrix(transpose(A))

@benchmark A_tr*f

BenchmarkTools.Trial: 10000 samples with 1 evaluation.

Range (min … max): 87.375 μs … 210.875 μs ┊ GC (min … max): 0.00% … 0.00%

Time (median): 88.542 μs ┊ GC (median): 0.00%

Time (mean ± σ): 89.286 μs ± 3.266 μs ┊ GC (mean ± σ): 0.00% ± 0.00%

Memory estimate: 4.06 KiB, allocs estimate: 1.

Method 3

A_tr = sparse(Matrix(transpose(A)))

@benchmark A_tr*f

BenchmarkTools.Trial: 10000 samples with 9 evaluations.

Range (min … max): 2.102 μs … 1.017 ms ┊ GC (min … max): 0.00% … 99.40%

Time (median): 2.477 μs ┊ GC (median): 0.00%

Time (mean ± σ): 2.725 μs ± 13.428 μs ┊ GC (mean ± σ): 6.92% ± 1.41%

Memory estimate: 4.06 KiB, allocs estimate: 1.

Why doesn't Method 1 produce a similar performance as Method 3? I'm probably missing something basic here.

Thank you for your help!

2
  • Not an answer, but transposing a sparse matrix is not a trivial operation. Once the transpose is computed, the multiplication should be fast. So you may want to time the individual steps and see where the time is being spent. If you can avoid taking the transpose, that would help. Apr 27 at 16:36
  • IIRC, transpose(A) makes a view of A through LinearAlgebra, which requires translating coordinates for every access. I don't think the fast ways of doing MV math will work through that interface. I'm not surprised that converting your transpose to a matrix object instead of trying to do math through the view is faster.
    – CJR
    Apr 27 at 19:08

2 Answers 2

1

501×501 SparseMatrixCSC{Float64, Integer} with 1501 stored entries

Integer is an abstract type. This is what is slowing your code down. See the performance tips.

0

using the following MWE

using LinearAlgebra, BenchmarkTools, SparseArrays

A = sprand(501,501,0.005)
At1 = transpose(A)
At2 = sparse(Matrix(transpose(A)))
f = rand(Float64,501,1)

you will find no significant performance difference between

@benchmark $At1*$f

and

@benchmark $At2*$f

As was pointed out by @SGJ the trick is to have a primitive type as parameter for your container, i.e. SparseMatrixCSC{Float64, Int64} instead of SparseMatrixCSC{Float64, Integer}, which is what sprand(501,501,0.005) generates.


@CRJ

IIRC, transpose(A) makes a view of A through LinearAlgebra, which requires translating coordinates for every access. I don't think the fast ways of doing MV math will work through that interface. I'm not surprised that converting your transpose to a matrix object instead of trying to do math through the view is faster.

transpose(A) yields Transpose(A), where Transpose is a lazy transpose wrapper. For sparse-matrix-dense-vector multiplication there are tailored methods, which do not require any mutations of A.

1
  • Thank you Martin! I'm new to Julia and I didn't realize this. Indeed, I was defining the matrix A as SparseMatrixCSC{Float64,Integer}. My intuition was that, when in doubt, a more general type should be better. Thanks again, I learned something new from you! Apr 28 at 0:29

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