5

I have data frame like this

       class     col2    col3   col4   col5  col6
A      AA         0        5      4      2    15
B      AA         4       10     14     12    25
C      AA         19       2      8      5     3  
D      SS         17       5      5     32    12
E      AA         14       2      12    14    55
F      II         12      17       1     9     0 
G      SS         10      37       8     2    17
H      II         17       7       5     7   14

I want to remove all columns that have zero values

       class         col3    col4   col5     
A      AA              5       4      2   
B      AA               10     14     12    
C      AA                2      8      5      
D      SS                5      5     32    
E      AA                2     12    14    
F      II               17       1     9      
G      SS               37       8     2    
H      II                7       5     7    

So the result I want is just want those columns which do not contain any zeros

Thank you

4
  • 2
    df[,colSums(df==0)==0]. May 3, 2022 at 8:53
  • 1
    @user2974951 you have answered the question that was asked nicely! But actually all the columns have zeroes and the OP wants to know how to remove the rows that don't have any zeroes, rather than the columns. So it should be df[rowSums(df==0)==0,].
    – SamR
    May 3, 2022 at 8:57
  • 1
    why is col3 remaining?
    – TarJae
    May 3, 2022 at 9:20
  • I edited the question, can you please check it again
    – Reda
    May 3, 2022 at 9:21

7 Answers 7

4

Based on your description I assume you want to remove rows with zero values, not columns. Here's how you can do it with dplyr:

library(dplyr)

filter(df, across(everything(), ~.!=0))

#> # A tibble: 4 x 6
#>   class  col2  col3  col4  col5  col6
#>   <chr> <dbl> <dbl> <dbl> <dbl> <dbl>
#> 1 AA        4    10    14    12    25
#> 2 AA       19     2     8     5     3
#> 3 AA       14     2    12    14    55
#> 4 SS       10    37     8     2    17
1
  • I'm sorry i have modified the question can you please check it again
    – Reda
    May 3, 2022 at 9:11
4

A possible solution:

df[apply(df == 0, 2, sum) == 0]

#>   class col3 col4 col5
#> A    AA    5    4    2
#> B    AA   10   14   12
#> C    AA    2    8    5
#> D    SS    5    5   32
#> E    AA    2   12   14
#> F    II   17    1    9
#> G    SS   37    8    2
#> H    II    7    5    7
3
  • 1
    Please note rownames
    – patL
    May 3, 2022 at 9:33
  • 1
    Thanks for having commented my answer, @patL. I had no rownames in my dataframe, but I have meanwhile added them.
    – PaulS
    May 3, 2022 at 9:37
  • 1
    It was just to match the op ;) thanks
    – patL
    May 3, 2022 at 9:38
4

With the new dataset: base R: In base R we can use Filter and negate any:

Filter(function(x) !any(x %in% 0), df) 
  class col3 col4 col5
A    AA    5    4    2
B    AA   10   14   12
C    AA    2    8    5
D    SS    5    5   32
E    AA    2   12   14
F    II   17    1    9
G    SS   37    8    2
H    II    7    5    7
2
  • I'm sorry i have modified the question can you please check it again
    – Reda
    May 3, 2022 at 9:11
  • See my update, please.
    – TarJae
    May 3, 2022 at 9:34
3

One base R option could be:

df_so[,!sapply(df_so, function(x) any(x == 0))]

#  class col3 col4 col5
#A    AA    5    4    2
#B    AA   10   14   12
#C    AA    2    8    5
#D    SS    5    5   32
#E    AA    2   12   14
#F    II   17    1    9
#G    SS   37    8    2
#H    II    7    5    7

Not my answer, but @user2974951 provided a very fast and straightforward answer as a comment in the Original Post:

df[,colSums(df==0)==0]
2

Here is another option using a combination of select and where:

library(tidyverse)

df %>%
  select(where(~!any(. == 0)))

Output

  class col3 col4 col5
A    AA    5    4    2
B    AA   10   14   12
C    AA    2    8    5
D    SS    5    5   32
E    AA    2   12   14
F    II   17    1    9
G    SS   37    8    2
H    II    7    5    7

Before select_if was deprecated, we could have written it like:

df %>%
  select_if( ~ !any(. == 0))

Data Table

Here is a possible data.table solution:

library(data.table)

dt <- as.data.table(df)

dt[, .SD,  .SDcols = !names(dt)[(colSums(dt == 0) > 0)]]

Data

df <- structure(list(class = c("AA", "AA", "AA", "SS", "AA", "II", 
"SS", "II"), col2 = c(0L, 4L, 19L, 17L, 14L, 12L, 10L, 17L), 
    col3 = c(5L, 10L, 2L, 5L, 2L, 17L, 37L, 7L), col4 = c(4L, 
    14L, 8L, 5L, 12L, 1L, 8L, 5L), col5 = c(2L, 12L, 5L, 32L, 
    14L, 9L, 2L, 7L), col6 = c(15L, 25L, 3L, 12L, 55L, 0L, 17L, 
    14L)), class = "data.frame", row.names = c("A", "B", "C", 
"D", "E", "F", "G", "H"))
1

You can try the trick Filter + anyNA

> Filter(Negate(anyNA), replace(df, df == 0, NA))
  class col3 col4 col5
A    AA    5    4    2
B    AA   10   14   12
C    AA    2    8    5
D    SS    5    5   32
E    AA    2   12   14
F    II   17    1    9
G    SS   37    8    2
H    II    7    5    7
0

If you want to remove columns that have at least one zero value, u can uses colSums(df == 0) == 0 to identify columns where the sum of zeros is zero (i.e., no zeros in the column). The resulting df will only contain columns without any zero values.

df <- data.frame(
  row.names = c("A", "B", "C", "D", "E", "F", "G", "H"),
  class = c("AA", "AA", "AA", "SS", "AA", "II", "SS", "II"),
  col2 = c(0, 4, 19, 17, 14, 12, 10, 17),
  col3 = c(5, 10, 2, 5, 2, 17, 37, 7),
  col4 = c(4, 14, 8, 5, 12, 1, 8, 5),
  col5 = c(2, 12, 5, 32, 14, 9, 2, 7),
  col6 = c(15, 25, 3, 12, 55, 0, 17, 14)
)

df[, colSums(df == 0) == 0, drop = FALSE]
class col3 col4 col5
A    AA    5    4    2
B    AA   10   14   12
C    AA    2    8    5
D    SS    5    5   32
E    AA    2   12   14
F    II   17    1    9
G    SS   37    8    2
H    II    7    5    7

or simply

df[, !apply(df == 0, 2, any)]

or

df[, colSums(df != 0) == nrow(df)]

U can also use purr package aswell

library(purrr)
df %>% keep(~ !any(. == 0)) # or discard 

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