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I have 17 (len(inputStartSlice)) slices of indexes that'll make a series of string slices. Currently, my code is only producing a single slice of strings (a single input, as I hardcode the positions, seen below) when I have 17 that I need to loop through into a single, 2D array of strings.

var inputSlices []string
var inputStartSlice []int
var inputEndSlice []int
var input []string
var inputs [][]string


for v, line := range inputSlices {
  if strings.Contains(line, "{") {
    inputStartSlice = append(inputStartSlice, v)
  }
  if strings.Contains(line, "}") {
    inputEndSlice = append(inputEndSlice, v+1)
  }
}

input = inputSlice[inputStartSlice[3]:inputEndSlice[3]]

inputs = append(inputs, input)
fmt.Println(inouts)

Playground

Is there a better way to go about doing this? I'm sure there is, if anybody can help me understand better approaches or elaborate on how I can solve where I'm currently stuck..

3
  • 2
    What do you want to achieve exactly? Please provide sample input data and a desired output as well.
    – Fenistil
    May 4 at 10:18
  • 1
    It's still not clear. Please make a working code example on Go Playground and share with us. And edit your question, write down the exact input slices and the desired output in go syntax. What is String!? It can be any string or is it literally String!?
    – Fenistil
    May 4 at 21:50
  • 1
    It looks like you are trying to parse a mini-language that describes your data - I don't recognise the format. If you have the option, I'd strongly recommend using a standard format. Eg: JSON, Protobuf, or TOML instead - then you can use common libraries to marshal/unmarshal data. You may need to write a tokenizer and lexer to parse the data if you must use a custom data format.
    – mpx
    May 5 at 5:48

2 Answers 2

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You can achieve the same without using extra variables

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "log"
    "strings"

    "golang.org/x/exp/slices"
)

func main() {

    var codeSlices = []string{
        "# INPUTS",
        "",
        "input CreateUserInput {",
        "  username: String!",
        "  email: String!",
        "  password: String!",
        "}",
        "",
        "input AuthUserInput {",
        "  user: String!",
        "  password: String!",
        "  code: String",
        "}",
        "",
        "input RefreshTokensInput{",
        "  refreshToken: String!",
        "}",
        "",
        "input VerifyEmailInput {",
        "  token: String!",
        "}",
        "",
        "# OBJECTS",
        "",
    }

    //Check for boundaries
    inputStart := slices.Index(codeSlices, "# INPUTS") //Use built-in functions for the search
    if inputStart == -1 {
        log.Fatal("# INPUTS not found")
    }

    objectStart := slices.Index(codeSlices, "# OBJECTS")
    if objectStart == -1 {
        log.Fatal("# OBJECTS not found")
    }

    inputStart = 0
    var inputs [][]string
    for i := inputStart + 2; i < objectStart-1; i++ {
        if idx := strings.Index(codeSlices[i], "{"); idx > 0 {
            inputStart = i
            continue
        }
        if idx := slices.Index(codeSlices[inputStart:], "}"); inputStart > 0 {
            inputs = append(inputs, codeSlices[inputStart:i+idx])
            inputStart = 0
        }
    }

    if inputStart > 0 {
        log.Fatal("Mismatch inputs")
    }

    fmt.Printf("%#v\n", inputs)
}

Playground

1

I've rewritten your code in a more idiomatic way. Check the comments for explanations. This code works, but as mpx suggested, for processing any custom format you have to write a tokenizer and a lexer to be sure that everything is parsed correctly and every possible syntax error is handled.

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "log"
    "strings"

    "golang.org/x/exp/slices"
)

func main() {

    var codeSlices = []string{
        "# INPUTS",
        "",
        "input CreateUserInput {",
        "  username: String!",
        "  email: String!",
        "  password: String!",
        "}",
        "",
        "input AuthUserInput {",
        "  user: String!",
        "  password: String!",
        "  code: String",
        "}",
        "",
        "input RefreshTokensInput{",
        "  refreshToken: String!",
        "}",
        "",
        "input VerifyEmailInput {",
        "  token: String!",
        "}",
        "",
        "# OBJECTS",
        "",
    }

    //Check for boundaries
    inputStart := slices.Index(codeSlices, "# INPUTS") //Use built-in functions for the search
    if inputStart == -1 {
        log.Fatal("# INPUTS not found")
    }

    objectStart := slices.Index(codeSlices, "# OBJECTS")
    if objectStart == -1 {
        log.Fatal("# OBJECTS not found")
    }

    var inputStartSlice []int
    var inputEndSlice []int

    //No need to copy your codeSlices to inputSlice, just go from inputs to objects, this is faster.
    for i := inputStart + 2; i < objectStart-1; i++ {
        if strings.HasSuffix(codeSlices[i], "{") { //HasSuffix is better here, since the { must be the last char
            inputStartSlice = append(inputStartSlice, i)
            continue //No need to check for closing bracket, so we can continue to skip another check
        }
        if codeSlices[i] == "}" { //Direct equality is faster than Contains
            inputEndSlice = append(inputEndSlice, i+1)
        }
    }

    //Check to every open bracket have a closing one
    if len(inputStartSlice) != len(inputEndSlice) {
        log.Fatal("len(inputStartSlice) != len(inputEndSlice)")
    }

    //Concating final results
    var inputs [][]string
    for i := range inputStartSlice {
        inputs = append(inputs, codeSlices[inputStartSlice[i]:inputEndSlice[i]])
    }

    fmt.Println(inputs)
}
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