5

I think, it is easier explain using an example. Let's take a class that model the speed of a Formula 1 car, the interface may look something like:

class SpeedF1
{
public:
  explicit SpeedF1(double speed);
  double getSpeed() const;
  void setSpeed(double newSpeed);
  //other stuff as unit 
private:
  double speed_;
};

Now, negative speed are not meaningful in this particular case and neither value greater then 500 km/h. In this case the constructor and the setSpeed function may throw exceptions if the value provide is not within a logical range.

I can introduce an extra layer of abstraction and insert a extra object instead of double. The new object will be a wrapper around the double and it will be construct and never modify. The interface of the class will be changed to:

class ReasonableSpeed
{
public:
  explicit ReasonableSpeed(double speed); //may throw a logic error
  double getSpeed() const;
  //no setter are provide
private:
  double speed_;
};

class SpeedF1
{
public:
  explicit SpeedF1(const ReasonableSpeed& speed);
  ReasonableSpeed getSpeed() const;
  void setSpeed(const ReasonableSpeed& newSpeed);
  //other stuff as unit 
private:
  ReasonableSpeed speed_;
};

With this design SpeedF1 cannot throw, however I need to extra pay an object constructor every time I want to reset the speed.

For class where a limited set of value are reasonable (for example the Months in a calendar) I usually make the constructor private and provide a complete set of static functions. In this case it is impossible, another possibility is implement a null object pattern but I am not sure it is superior to simply throw an exception.

Finally, my question is:

What is the best practise to solve this kind of problem?

2
  • 1
    A class that represents the velocity of the car? What are you trying to encapsulate? Also don't enforce things that are not physically/mathematically impossible, like speed < 500km/h, someone <strike>will build<strike> built a supersonic car and will file you a bug. Aug 27 '11 at 16:15
  • the class was just an example, as I said at the first line, think at any class that accept a real number between two values. The percentage is another example it is a real number between 0 and 100. Aug 27 '11 at 18:23
6

First off, don’t overestimate the cost of the extra constructor. In fact, this cost should be exactly the cost of initialising a double plus the cost for the validity check. In other words, it is likely equal to using a raw double.

Secondly, lose the setter. Setters – and, to a lesser degree, getters – are almost always anti-patterns. If you need to set a new (maximum) speed, chances are you actually want a new car.

Now, about the actual problem: a throwing constructor is completely fine in principle. Don’t write convoluted code to avoid such a construct.

On the other hand, I also like the idea of self-checking types. This makes the best use of C++’ type system and I’m all in favour of that.

Both alternatives have their advantages. Which one is best really depends on the exact situation. In general, I try to exploit the type system and static type checking as much as possible. In your case, this would mean having an extra type for the speed.

12
  • 2
    "lose the setter... chances are you actually want a new car" That's a quite functional approach to look at things, but I am not sure whether liberal use of this style in C++ really has no adverse effects on performance.
    – kizzx2
    Aug 27 '11 at 16:06
  • @Konrad Rudolph "lose the setter.Setters are almost always anti-patterns." I would like to learn more about this, do you have any good link (or book) on this topic? Aug 27 '11 at 16:10
  • @Alessandro Felleisen has a talk on teaching this type of design ccs.neu.edu/home/matthias/Presentations/FDPE2005/htdch.pdf and a book draft. ccs.neu.edu/home/matthias/htdc.html
    – antonakos
    Aug 27 '11 at 16:55
  • 3
    "If you need to set a new speed, chances are you actually want a new car." Seriously? I am probably the most "functional" programmer in my office, and even I think that sounds insane. I can change speeds in my actual car without buying a new one; why should the object representing my car be different?
    – Nemo
    Aug 27 '11 at 17:13
  • 1
    @Nemo I agree, "chances are you want a new car" is ridiculous. To add a little to the answer, I'd also say that if people see something thrown in the constructor, they know that they constructed the object wrong. But if some other member function throws, it's not clear that they constructed it wrong because they might just have used the function that threw wrong. Aug 27 '11 at 17:50
1

I strongly vote for the second option. This is only my personal opinion without a lot of academic backing. My experience is that setting up a "pure" system that operates on only valid data makes your code a lot cleaner. This can be achieved by using your second approach which ensures that only valid data enters the system.

If your system grows, you may find that ReasonableSpeed gets used in a lot of places (use your discretion, but chances are things actually get reused quite a lot). The second approach will save you a lot of error checking codes in the long term.

1
  • I agree with the overall argument (the “pure system” part especially). On the other hand, having an entity represent speed may be overkill. Aug 28 '11 at 8:19
1

If only one class inherits from ReasonableSpeed then it seems a bit of an overkill.

If many classes inherit from, or use ReasonableSpeed, then it's smart.

0

Both of your designs yield the same result when an invalid value is used as speed, i.e. they both throw an exception. Applying Occam's razor principle, or Unix Rule of Rarsimony:

Rule of Parsimony: Write a big program only when it is clear by demonstration that nothing else will do.

‘Big’ here has the sense both of large in volume of code and of internal complexity. Allowing programs to get large hurts maintainability. Because people are reluctant to throw away the visible product of lots of work, large programs invite overinvestment in approaches that are failed or suboptimal.

you may like to pick the first simpler approach. Unless you'd like to reuse ReasonableSpeed class.

0

I would recommend doing this instead:

class SpeedF1
{
public:
  explicit SpeedF1(double maxSpeed);
  double getSpeed() const;
  void accelerate();
  void decelerate();
protected:
  void setSpeed(double speed);
  //other stuff as unit 
private:
  double maxSpeed_;
  double curSpeed_;
};

SpeedF1::SpeedF1(double maxSpeed) maxSpeed_(maxSpeed), curSpeed_(0.0) { }

double SpeedF1::getSpeed() const { return curSpeed_; }

void SpeedF1::setSpeed(double speed) {
    if(speed < 0.0) speed = 0.0;
    if(speed > maxSpeed_) speed = maxSpeed_;
    curSpeed = speed;
}

void SpeedF1::accelerate() {
    setSpeed(curSpeed_ + SOME_CONSTANT_VELOCITY);
}


void SpeedF1::decelerate() {
    setSpeed(curSpeed_ - SOME_CONSTANT_VELOCITY);
}

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