9

I've got a function of the form:

def get_new_file(prefix: str) -> pathlib.Path:
    for i in itertools.count(0):
        p = pathlib.Path(f'{prefix}_{i}')
        if not p.is_file():
            return p
    # This line is unreachable.

mypy understandably complains that the function is missing a return statement. Is there a way to mark a line so as to inform mypy that the line should be considered unreachable?

0

3 Answers 3

9

This was raised as an issue. The recommended solution is assert False.

def get_new_file(prefix: str) -> pathlib.Path:
    for i in itertools.count(0):
        p = pathlib.Path(f'{prefix}_{i}')
        if not p.is_file():
            return p
    assert False
3

Once again this is a typical issue where keeping things simple should apply. mypy obviously does not know where the loops ends, so it's warning you about it in advance as the function's end-of-line statement does not have a return statement.

A simple approach is to break the loop and return the last value of the pathlib.Path which was last set. Here is an example.

def get_new_file(prefix: str) -> pathlib.Path:
    p : Optional[pathlib.Path] = None 
    for i in itertools.count(0):
        p = pathlib.Path(f'{prefix}_{i}')
        if not p.is_file():
            break
        
    return p 

If you restructure the above code snippet, mypy will not raise the errors again.

2

Mypy is not wrong, you should not mark that line as unreachable but raise an error, even if you are sure that you won't ever hit that line it's a good coding practice and you can save yourself some time debugging later on

def get_new_file(prefix: str) -> pathlib.Path:
    for i in itertools.count(0):
        p = pathlib.Path(f'{prefix}_{i}')
        if not p.is_file():
            return p
    raise Exception # pick a meaningful exception
4
  • Doesn't assert False raise such an assertion? Mar 3, 2023 at 14:34
  • No, asserts are no-OP and they are only run on debug mode. Mar 3, 2023 at 14:49
  • Fair point. However, in such a case as this where the line is quite obviously unreachable, I'm happy with merely satisfying mypy. Mar 3, 2023 at 14:55
  • 1
    you can also just use a while loop, but it's a bit more ugly I guess Mar 3, 2023 at 15:01

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