1

I have a list of HEX colours that I want to use for my graphs/tables etc in R.

I have written a piece of code that calls these values at the start of the script.

col1 <- '#00573F'
col2 <- '#40816F'
col3 <- '#804B9F' 
col4 <- '#C0D5D0'
col5 <- '#A29161'

I then call these values when plotting throughout, for example:

x <- seq(-pi, pi, 0.1)
plot(x, sin(x),
     main="The Sine Function",
     ylab="sin(x)",
     type="l",
     col=col1)

This works perfectly.

However, I was wondering if there is a way to store these colour variables within R as a standard set of variables that I don't have to call every time I start a new script?

Also, it would be great if they didn't show up in the Environment as values purely because there are so many of these colours and I have a hard time keeping track of all the other values in there.

3 Answers 3

4

Many have adopted packages as the default way to write R code, to enable organising things like this.

You can get away with a barebone version, which I'll describe here.

You need a R/ folder; dir.create("R"). This directory should not contain scripts, but rather standalone functions, etc. that you have no problem sourcing whenever appropriate.

Inside of this you could make a custom_colors function; file.edit("R/custom_colors.R") (this will open a file in RStudio). Add:

custom_colors <- function(color_id) {
  c(
    col1 = '#00573F',
    col2 = '#40816F',
    col3 = '#804B9F',
    col4 = '#C0D5D0',
    col5 = '#A29161'
  )[color_id]
}

Then wherever you need it, you may write source("R/custom_colors.R") to have that single function enter your environment.

Thus you may call custom_colors(1) instead of col1.

0
3

A handful of options to consider

Develop an internal package for your color constants

I won't so far as to write the package, but packages may contain any R object (not just functions and data). You could develop an internal package to hold your color constants. If your package is names myInternals, you can then call

x <- seq(-pi, pi, 0.1)
plot(x, sin(x),
     main="The Sine Function",
     ylab="sin(x)",
     type="l",
     col= myInternals::col1)

If you have multiple people that need access to your constants, this is the path I would take. It's a bit more overhead work, but separates the constants into a separate environment that is relatively easy to access.

Truth be told, I have an internal package where I work now that uses @Mossa's strategy.

Use 'hidden objects'

If you precede an object with a ., it won't show up in the list of items in the environment (assuming you're using the RStudio pane)

But run the following:

.col1 <- "#00573F"

# .col1 doesn't show up
ls()

# .col1 does show up
ls(all.names = TRUE)

x <- seq(-pi, pi, 0.1)
plot(x, sin(x),
     main="The Sine Function",
     ylab="sin(x)",
     type="l",
     col= .col1)

This is probably the easiest, in my opinion, and what I would do if no one else needed access to my constants.

Use a list

Much like @Mossa's answer, using a list will reduce the number of new objects shown in the environment to just 1.

col_list <- list(col1 = '#00573F'
                 col2 = '#40816F'
                 col3 = '#804B9F' 
                 col4 = '#C0D5D0'
                 col5 = '#A29161')

x <- seq(-pi, pi, 0.1)
plot(x, sin(x),
     main="The Sine Function",
     ylab="sin(x)",
     type="l",
     col=col_env$col1)

Use an environment

This also only adds one object to the environment, and stores the constants outside of the current environment. Using them isn't much different than using a list, however, so I'm not sure what exactly is gained.

col_env <- new.env()

assign("col1", "#00573F", col_env)

x <- seq(-pi, pi, 0.1)
plot(x, sin(x),
     main="The Sine Function",
     ylab="sin(x)",
     type="l",
     col=col_env$col1)
1
  • Wow, thank you for this. I have accepted the first answer as it worked brilliantly. However, I will be taking a look at these options later and investigating how they work. Thank you for the thorough information.
    – Miki Parr
    Commented May 12, 2022 at 11:12
2

You can add them to your .Rprofile as list or a function (as Mossa suggests), that R will run at each startup.

See this post on how to find your .Rprofile.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.