2

I was just experimenting and this got me confused. I don't see why calling foo two times should affect output of the timeout callback from previous invocation. This code:

let state = {
    age: 0
};
let getState = () => {
     let setState = () => {
        state = {
            age: state.age + 1
        }
    }
    return {
        state,
        setState
    }
}

function foo() {
    let {
        state:st,
        setState
    } = getState();
    replicaUseEffect = () => {
        console.log("replicaUseEffect", st);
    }
    console.log("before", st);

    setState()
    console.log("after", st);


    setTimeout(() => replicaUseEffect(), 1000)
};
foo();

produces following output which I am ok with more or less:

"before", {
  age: 0
}
"after", {
  age: 0
}
"replicaUseEffect", {
  age: 0
}

Now, simply call foo twice instead:

foo();
foo();

And output is this:

"before", {
  age: 0
}
"after", {
  age: 0
}
"before", {
  age: 1
}
"after", {
  age: 1
}
"replicaUseEffect", {
  age: 1
}
"replicaUseEffect", {
  age: 1
}

Why calling foo two times affect both replicaUseEffect values in the second example and output 1 two times? I tried also printing inside the console.log with JSON.stringify but result is the same.

1 Answer 1

1

The reason that both replicaUseEffect calls output the same value, is that replicaUseEffect has been defined as a global variable, and so the second call of foo replaces the previous version of replicaUseEffect with a new one. And although its code is exactly the same, it lives in a different closure, which has the st local variable of the second execution context of foo.

You don't have this effect when replicaUseEffect is defined as a local variable:

let state = {
    age: 0
};
let getState = () => {
     let setState = () => {
        state = {
            age: state.age + 1
        }
    }
    return {
        state,
        setState
    }
}

function foo() {
    let {
        state:st,
        setState
    } = getState();
    const replicaUseEffect = () => {
        console.log("replicaUseEffect", st);
    }
    console.log("before", st);

    setState()
    console.log("after", st);


    setTimeout(() => replicaUseEffect(), 1000)
};
foo();
foo();

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