42

It turns out +0 === -0 evaluates to true despite +0 and −0 being different entities. So, how do you differentiate +0 from −0?

There is a hack:

if (1 / myZero > 0) {
   // myZero is +0
} else {
   // myZero is -0
}

Can I do better?

6
  • 17
    Why do you need to know this? (Not condescending... I am really curious!) Aug 28, 2011 at 20:35
  • 2
    your solution seems reasonable. (+0 === -0) being true seems like an oversight in the language so I don't know how else you'll resolve it. I wouldn't expect it to come up frequently.
    – evan
    Aug 28, 2011 at 20:35
  • 12
    @evan, it's not an oversight, it's what IEEE 754 requires. Aug 28, 2011 at 20:42
  • 2
    You don't need a function, just do this check: if ( 1 / x > 0 ) { ... Aug 28, 2011 at 20:44
  • 5
    @Jason: I'm just playing around with the specs, and considering a bunch of thought experiments. These kind of bizarre things could potentially lead to difficult-to-find bugs. See one of my fears here: stackoverflow.com/questions/7223517/…
    – Randomblue
    Aug 28, 2011 at 21:02

9 Answers 9

27

In ECMAScript 6 Object.is behaves like === except that it distinguishes positive and negative zeroes, and Object.is(NaN, NaN) evaluates to true. (See here for a writeup.)

Chrome 24 supports Object.is.

1
  • there's also an alternative version for ECMAScript 5 at the end of this documentation if you need it for old browsers Aug 16, 2016 at 1:43
14

This is still some kind of hack, but a look at the specs suggests this:

Math.atan2(0, -0) === Math.PI // true
Math.atan2(0,  0) === 0       // true
6
  • Which specs are you referring to? ECMAScript? (Not doubting, I just want to know...) Aug 28, 2011 at 20:43
  • @Jared Farrish: Yes, the part of atan2.
    – pimvdb
    Aug 28, 2011 at 20:44
  • Do you have a link by chance? Aug 28, 2011 at 20:44
  • Ok, thanks guys. :) It's for my own edification. (Note, pimvdb's reference is found at bclary.com/2004/11/07/#a-15.8.2.5) Aug 28, 2011 at 20:47
  • 1
    It works but is x10 times slower on my chrome than 1/zero test
    – csharpfolk
    Aug 7, 2015 at 17:09
9

According to David Flanagan's book, p. 34, dividing 1 by your zero will produce the corresponding infinity, which can then be used in an equality check:

1 / 0
> Infinity
1 / -0
> -Infinity

And here's the behavior of the equality comparisons of infinities:

Infinity === -Infinity
> false
Infinity === Infinity
> true
-Infinity === Infinity
> false
-Infinity === -Infinity
> true
3
  • 1
    This doesn't work with every number: 1 / -5e-324 results in -Infinity, yet -5e-324 === -0 is false.
    – Timothy Gu
    Dec 8, 2017 at 2:38
  • @TimothyGu What's your point? The question specifically asks about +0 and -0, not about "every number". Dec 8, 2017 at 11:25
  • Certainly true. My bad for forgetting the original question
    – Timothy Gu
    Dec 9, 2017 at 18:49
4

To check the negative zero, here is one simple solution.

function isNegativeZero(n) {
    n = Number( n );
    return (n === 0) && (1 / n === -Infinity);
}
3

This returns +0:

-0 + 0

This doesn't help to differenciate -0 and +0, but this helps in ensuring that some value is not -0.

1 / -0       => -Infinity  
1 / (-0 + 0) => Infinity
2
  • 4
    or you could use Math.abs(-0).
    – evan
    Aug 28, 2011 at 21:12
  • 5
    This is very useful for me because I needed to specifically ensure positive zero but leave other signed numbers alone.
    – Semicolon
    Mar 23, 2014 at 4:00
3

As people seem stumped as to what the practical need for this would be: here is my use case...

I needed a solution to sort the columns of a table by their index. Click the <th> and invoke the sorter with [ordinal] for ascending and -[ordinal] for descending. The first column would give -0 for descending or 0 for ascending.

So I need to differentiate between +0 and -0 and ended up here. The solution that worked for me is in the comment by @Šime Vidas, but is hidden away somewhat.

// This comparison works for all negatives including -0
if ( 1 / x > 0 ) { }

1 / -0 > 0  // false
1 / 0 > 0  // true
1 / -99 > 0 // false
1 / 99 > 0 // true

// WRONG: this naive comparison might give unexpected results
if ( x > 0 ) { }

-0 > 0 // true
// Gotcha
0
1

One straight option in Node.js is to use Buffer.

var negZero = Buffer('8000000000000000', 'hex')

var buf = Buffer(8);
buf.writeDoubleBE(myZero);

if (buf.equals(negZero)) {
    // myZero is -0
} else {
    // myZero is +0
}

Also, you can easily browserify them by buffer module.

1
  • 1
    Same idea by using TypedArray: isPosZero = x => !(new Uint8Array(new Float64Array([x]).buffer).some(Boolean))
    – tsh
    Jan 9, 2018 at 7:37
0

As hinted at by Matt Fenwick, you could just do (using the var zero):

if(1/zero===Infinity) {
  // zero is +0
} else {
  // zero is -0
}
0

Use Math.sign()

console.log(Math.sign( 1 / +0 ));
console.log(Math.sign( 1 / -0 ));

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