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I am working on a port of a Borland C++Builder 6 (BCB6) application to C++Builder 11 (CB11). Library code that compiles, links, and runs under BCB6 also compiles and links, but causes an access violation, under CB11. The AV doesn't occur in the library code, rather it happens when an fstream type is instantiated somewhere else in the application - say, on the MainForm.

The AV looks like this:

Project Executable.exe raised exception class $C0000005 with message 'access violation at 0x00406af9: write of address 0x00409240'.

It pops up here in xlocale at the specified line:

operator size_t()
    {   // get stamp, with lazy allocation
    if (_Id == 0)
        {   // still zero, allocate stamp
        _Lockit _Lock(_LOCK_LOCALE);
        if (_Id == 0)
            _Id = ++_Id_cnt; // <-- AV here
        }
    return (_Id);
    }

My library unit implements a Singleton class with static member functions, but as it turns out any class with a static member function that instantiates an fstream object anywhere (in any method) and is implemented within a static library seems to cause this issue. Based on my limited testing at least. Here is my trivial example:

LibraryUnit.h

class Foo
{
  public:
  static void Bar();
};

LibraryUnit.cpp

void Foo::Bar(){
  ifstream in1;
}

fmMain.cpp (MainForm constructor only)

__fastcall TForm1::TForm1(TComponent* Owner)
    : TForm(Owner)
{
  ofstream out;  // <= access violation here ...
}

If I exclude the library (.lib) from the executable, and include the library unit directly, there is no AV.

It would seem to me that this is an issue with the linker and/or library initialization.

This works fine in BCB6.

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  • I am in porting process from BDS2006 (direct successor of BCB6 before RAD) to RAD11 too no clue to your problem just a silly note is your app 32 or 64 bit? if 64 then you might have problem with 32bit obj/dll ... have you tried using CodeGuard ? It might find the problem or at least hint what is wrong my bet is you got wrong pointer somewhere along the way ...
    – Spektre
    May 16 at 7:34
  • The application is Win32 using the classic C++ compiler. I tried building my test app / test lib with clang compiler but the result was the same. May 16 at 7:50
  • Using CodeGuard throws to an assembly language window. A bit low gear I think and at this point not helpful. There are no pointers in my example. May 16 at 7:58
  • The CodeGuard crash usually holds up the whole calling sequence so you know which line of code call the function that crash (at least in BDS2006 did not get to the point using it in RAD yet)... from there you can inspect pointers or object references one of them might be NULL or unitialized ... assembly is for stuff that has no source code ... that is to be expected for linked stuff like dll,obj,...
    – Spektre
    May 16 at 8:49

1 Answer 1

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It turned out that the application and library setting for "Link with Dynamic RTL" were different.

It seems the default for a new lib is false while the default for a new exe is true.

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  • good to know +1 ...
    – Spektre
    May 17 at 7:50

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