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I am converting a Delphi 6 project on Windows XP to Delphi 11 on Windows 11. I have an issue that is most likely common, but not knowing Assembly I am a bit confused.

//This complies fine in 64 or 32 bit
{$IFDEF WIN32}
asm
    mov edx, aStream
    mov eax, aObject
    call aPointer
end;
{$ENDIF}
//this does not compile in 64 due to inline Assembly
{$IFDEF WIN64}
asm
    mov ecx, aStream
    mov eax, aObject
    call aPointer
end;
{$ENDIF}

Is there a good reference I can use to learn this quickly? Is there a simple solution?

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  • Do you know why the x86 code is written the way it is? What is being pointed to by aPointer, why does it (apparently) expect its (apparently) two parameters in edx and eax, which does not match a popular calling convention? Is the 64-bit version of the thing pointed-to by aPointer also engaged in funny calling conventions?
    – GSerg
    May 16 at 14:46
  • 2
    @GSerg Delphi's x86 ABI uses the Borland fastcall (aka : 'register') calling convention where arguments to methods are passed left-to-right in EAX, EDX, and ECX (in that order) followed by the remainder on the stack. Naturally, the same is not true for x64.
    – J...
    May 16 at 14:53
  • 3
    @JimRodimon - to answer your question, NO - there is no way to learn this quickly. If that was going to happen, you'd have learned it already. Unfortunately, like many things, x64 assembly is a complex topic that takes time to learn. For one, x64 uses a different suite of registers than x86, has a different native pointer size, a different calling convention, and different rules for the responsibilities of methods in the application. You can't write effective assembly without understanding all of these subtleties and how they interact.
    – J...
    May 16 at 14:55
  • 5
    The other thing you should consider is whether, if you're attempting to translate x86 code to x64, whether assembly is even the right answer. This seems to be a short section that simply call another method. If you don't have a good reason for doing this in assembly, the best advice is probably to just rewrite this in pure pascal, something like, ie : TMyMethod(aPointer)(aObject, aStream); Maybe even consider getting rid of the need for that ugly cast - it's probably not necessary and is simply the result of a poor design choice elsewhere in the application.
    – J...
    May 16 at 14:58
  • I have no idea why it was written this way. May 16 at 15:33

1 Answer 1

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So the best asm is the no-asm to write.

We can replace

{$IFDEF WIN32}
asm
    mov edx, aStream
    mov eax, aObject
    call aPointer
end;
{$ENDIF}

with native pascal code.

This is a no-operation, just a function call.

Just replace it with

type
  TMethodCallWithStream = procedure(Instance: TObject; Str: TStream);
...
   TMethodCallWithStream(aPointer)(aObject, aStream);

It won't be slower than previous asm code, and it will work on all platforms, both Win32 and WIN64.

Here self is passed as first argument. So the actual method called is something like MethodName(Stream: TStream); But this is how methods are called: self is passed as first argument - eax in Win32 assembly. Then the 2nd argument is in fact the first method argument in the source - edx in Win32 assembly. You could use a TMethod wrapper, but it would be more complicated.

See the Delphi documentation about reference about how methods are called:

Under the register convention, Self behaves as if it were declared before all other parameters. It is therefore always passed in the EAX register.

Edit/Hint: When you do some refactoring for a new target, the less rewrite, the better. You should use the working target (here Win32) as reference, and always validate any modification you made in the code on it. So here, replacing asm with pascal code does make sense. Don't rewrite any further yet. Then when everything compiles on both Win32 and Win64, ensure it still runs on Win32, then see if it is fine on Win64. Use the debugger to validate each modification. My advice with refactoring is to first make it run, never break the existing, and then make it better - if you have time.

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