26

I have this code and this outputs the following:

link to the following example https://godbolt.org/z/z8Pn9GsTv

template <typename T>
struct A1 {
    A1() {
        std::cout << "construction of a1" << std::endl;
    }

    ~A1() {
        std::cout << "destruction of a1" << std::endl;
    }
    ~A1() requires (std::is_same_v<T,int>) {
        std::cout << "it is an int" << std::endl;
    }
};

int main() {
    A1 <int>a;
    
    return 0;
}

output:

construction of a1
destruction of a1

but swapping places of destructors it gives other result:

link to the code https://godbolt.org/z/vxj7dPqaj

template <typename T>
struct A1 {
    A1() {
        std::cout << "construction of a1" << std::endl;
    }

    ~A1() requires (std::is_same_v<T,int>) {
        std::cout << "it is an int" << std::endl;
    }
    ~A1() {
        std::cout << "destruction of a1" << std::endl;
    }
};

output:

construction of a1
it is an int

wondering is this a bug?

2

3 Answers 3

14

That's indeed a reported Clang bug1, as noted by Quimby.

Note that the second snippet (the one with the the constrained destructor first) doesn't really "work" in Clang, which just ignores the second destructor2.

Also note that, unlike gcc, at the moment I'm writing, Clang doesn't seem to have implemented [P0848R3] (which is about conditional trivial special member functions) yet3.


1) https://bugs.llvm.org/show_bug.cgi?id=50570
2) See e.g.: https://godbolt.org/z/rff7qfK65
3) See the reported values of the feature test macro __cpp_concepts, e.g. here: https://godbolt.org/z/P4z3Pj5vT

-2

In your 2'nd code,

Try changing this:

A1 <int>a;

To this:

A1 <double>a;

And you'll get the output:

construction of a1
destruction of a1 // With MSVC & GCC compiler

My interpretation here is that when the condition for the first constructor (with requires) fails, the 2'nd constructor is called which prints "destruction of a1" and destroys a.

Here is a more detailed explanation...

2
  • 1
    That's not the output one gets, Clang emits an error about an unsatisfied constraint. May 17 at 7:10
  • 1
    Yes true. Clang has a bug. I've mentioned the behavior that's correct according to me. I'll mention the compiler. May 17 at 7:12
-5

On your class template, you have two destructors definition recipe. During instantiation the The compiler gets the "first" recipe that match the signature needed. Depending the compiler depending the result. I think clang, gcc and mingw will provide the same result, msvc approach is different. Better pattern for partial specialization disambiguation precedence chain?

4
  • 2
    "The compiler gets the "first" recipe that match the signature needed. Depending the compiler depending the result.": No, that's not how it works. The order of declarations is supposed to be irrelevant. I don't know how the linked CWG issue is supposed to relate. May 17 at 15:44
  • "A1 <int>a; generates ~A1<int>() requires (std::is_same_v<T,int>){...} first and ~A1<int>(){...} after. both are valid. Which one is selected first according to the standard?"
    – abdeldiaz
    May 18 at 16:21
  • Your answer could be improved with additional supporting information. Please edit to add further details, such as citations or documentation, so that others can confirm that your answer is correct. You can find more information on how to write good answers in the help center.
    – Community Bot
    May 18 at 16:46
  • @abdeldiaz Normal overload resolution is applied (see eel.is/c++draft/class.dtor#4) If std::is_same_v<T,int> is satisfied, then the first overload is chosen since it is more constrained than the other (eel.is/c++draft/over#match.best.general-2.6). If it not satisfied than the other one, since it is the only viable overload. Overload resolution doesn't depend on the order of declarations. If the resolution was ambiguous the program would simply be ill-formed and should fail to compile. May 18 at 17:13

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