10

I would like to know where I can find some documentation about the following behavior:

class Foo {
public:
  Foo(int argX) : Foo(argX, defaultYValue) {}
  Foo(int argX, int argY) : x(argX), y(argY) {};
private:
  const int x;
  const int y;
  const int defaultYValue = -1;
}

Might it be possible that y value is undefined ? Or is there some documentation in the standard that tells that it works (I did noticed that the default member initialization is discarded if it is otherwise overridden inside the constructor)

PS: this was discovered while forgetting the static for defaultYValue.

8
  • 1
    In what case would x not be initialized? Did you perhaps means to ask about y whose value depends on defaultYValue in the first constructor? May 17 at 13:29
  • Yes, I modified the post (also put the exact order I have in my code (default initialized member after the other members) May 17 at 13:33
  • Constructors must initialize all data members that have no default values. Are you asking about : Foo(argX, defaultYValue)? This works fine, it is called a delegating constructor, doc: en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/language/constructor
    – Oasin
    May 17 at 13:37
  • Boils down to the question when those defaulting values actually get initialised... As it is -i-s- has been first variable declared it will be initialised first, have some doubts, though, that this will occur before delegating to the other constructor, so I'd assume you indeed are reading an uninitialised value – even before your edit...
    – Aconcagua
    May 17 at 13:38
  • 1
    @Oasin I assume it's clear that we are talking about constructor delegation – however the problem is that a value to be initialised is passed as argument to the delegated constructor – and question now is: Are we passing an uninitialised value to the latter or not???
    – Aconcagua
    May 17 at 13:41

3 Answers 3

12

Yes, the code has undefined behavior. When using a delegating constructor it is the delegating constructor that will initialize the class members. When you pass defaultYValue to the delegating constructor, it has not yet be initialized so you are passing an uninitialized value to the delegate, and said delegate uses that value to set y.

This is called out by [class.base.init]/7

The expression-list or braced-init-list in a mem-initializer is used to initialize the designated subobject (or, in the case of a delegating constructor, the complete class object) according to the initialization rules of [dcl.init] for direct-initialization.

0
3

As pointed out in the other answers at the time you use defaultYValue it has not yet been initialized. You can fix that by making it satic:

class Foo {
public:
  Foo(int argX) : Foo(argX, Foo::defaultYValue) {}
  Foo(int argX, int argY) : x(argX), y(argY) {};
private:
  const int x;
  const int y;
  static const int defaultYValue = -1;
}

But never write 2 constructors when one will suffice:

class Foo {
public:
  Foo(int argX, int argY = defaultYValue) : x(argX), y(argY) {};
private:
  const int x;
  const int y;
  static const int defaultYValue = -1;
}

But really why define a constant when it is only ever used once? It's clear from the use that it is the default value for y. There is no additional information gained from naming it defaultYValue:

class Foo {
public:
  Foo(int argX, int argY = -1) : x(argX), y(argY) {};
private:
  const int x;
  const int y;
}
3
  • In the context it needs to be names in order to give more context to what it is and the value should be owned by the class because it is private implementation of some weird behavior. I am not a big fan in general of having default values in method/constructor definition, I prefer to be explicit (it helped me several time when doing refactor to always have mandatory parameters, it is also easier for finding reference of a specific constructor call in your IDE. May 17 at 14:10
  • Then go with the static const int, an enum or enum class. May 17 at 14:12
  • As I stated in the initial post, the resulting code was only produced because I forgot the static (it was what I aimed), the question was mostly why it had undefined behavior, I looked for default initialized member and found nothing, the answer was near constructor delegation. May 17 at 14:14
2

I would like to know where I can find some documentation about the following behavior:

This is called delegation and the constructor Foo::Foo(int) is called a delegating constructor.

From class.base.init-6

A mem-initializer-list can delegate to another constructor of the constructor's class using any class-or-decltype that denotes the constructor's class itself. If a mem-initializer-id designates the constructor's class, it shall be the only mem-initializer; the constructor is a delegating constructor, and the constructor selected by the mem-initializer is the target constructor. The target constructor is selected by overload resolution. Once the target constructor returns, the body of the delegating constructor is executed. If a constructor delegates to itself directly or indirectly, the program is ill-formed, no diagnostic required.


Might it be possible that y value is undefined ?

Yes, the program has undefined behavior.

From class.base.init-7:

The expression-list or braced-init-list in a mem-initializer is used to initialize the designated subobject (or, in the case of a delegating constructor, the complete class object) according to the initialization rules of [dcl.init] for direct-initialization.

This means that the target constructor Foo::Foo(int, int) is used to initialize the data members. But since you're passing a data member defaultYValue which has not yet been initialized, we have undefined behavior.

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