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I wondered if it is possible if two threads belonging to the same program with the same PCID can share the TLB entry when they are scheduled to run on the same physical CPU?

I already looked into the SDM (https://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/developer/articles/technical/intel-sdm.html); page 3115 (TLB and HT) does not mention any sharing mechanism. But another part of the document states that before accessing the TLB entry, the PCID value is checked, and if it is equal, the value is used. However, there is also a bit for the current thread set next to the PCID identifier.

My question: is the PCID value used with priority over the CPU-thread bit or is it necessary that both values match?

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  • Good question; you'd hope threads of the same process sharing a physical core could share TLB entries, in TLB levels that are competitively shared, not statically partitioned. But the semantics of invlpg might be a problem for allowing that. Or maybe not since speculative loads of a TLB can happen at any time, and that time could be due to the other logical core's activity. May 18, 2022 at 15:55
  • From my understanding, this could be possible and would allow some performance benefits. However, it is not stated anywhere. Yes, obviously I was thinking about the shared L1TLB. Not about the partitioned ones. Empirically verifying it can be really hard, since the is so much noise and the program has to be large enough to fill the differents sets in the cache May 20, 2022 at 7:01
  • Since you mention it, maybe not that hard to test. There are perf counters for L1dTLB misses, so pin two threads to the same physical core, and have them each repeatedly touch a working set a couple entries smaller than the full L1dTLB size. Like dtlb_load_misses.stlb_hit plus dtlb_load_misses.miss_causes_a_walk May 20, 2022 at 11:50
  • I conducted some experiments, would you interpret the results also like I did? May 20, 2022 at 15:37

1 Answer 1

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From my observations, it is not possible (at least for the dTLB), even though it would bring performance benefits.

How I came to that conclusion

As suggested by Peter, I wrote a small program that consists of two worker threads that access the same heap region over and over again.

Compile with -O0 to prevent optimization.

#define _GNU_SOURCE
#include <stdio.h>
#include <pthread.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <inttypes.h>
#include <err.h>
#include <sched.h>
#include <sys/mman.h>

#define PAGE_SIZE 4096

int repetitions = 1ll << 20;
uint64_t ptrsize = 1ll<<18;
uint64_t main_cpu, co_cpu ;

void pin_task_to(int pid, int cpu)
{
    cpu_set_t cset;
    CPU_ZERO(&cset);
    CPU_SET(cpu, &cset);
    if (sched_setaffinity(pid, sizeof(cpu_set_t), &cset))
        err(1, "affinity");
}
void pin_to(int cpu) { pin_task_to(0, cpu); }


void *foo(void *p)
{
    pin_to(main_cpu);

    int value;
    uint8_t *ptr = (uint8_t *)p;
    printf("Running on CPU: %d\n", sched_getcpu());
    for (size_t j = 0; j < repetitions; j++)
    {
        for (size_t i = 0; i < ptrsize; i += PAGE_SIZE)
        {
            value += ptr[i];
        }
    }
    volatile int dummy = value;
    pthread_exit(NULL);
}

void *boo(void *p)
{
    pin_to(co_cpu);

    int value;
    uint8_t *ptr = (uint8_t *)p;
    printf("Running on CPU: %d\n", sched_getcpu());
    for (size_t j = 0; j < repetitions; j++)
    {
        for (size_t i = 0; i < ptrsize; i+=PAGE_SIZE)
        {
            value += ptr[i];
        }
    }
    volatile int dummy = value;
    pthread_exit(NULL);
}

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    if (argc < 3){
        exit(-1);
    }
    main_cpu = strtoul(argv[1], NULL, 16);
    co_cpu = strtoul(argv[2], NULL, 16);
    pthread_t id[2];
    void *mptr = malloc(ptrsize);

    pthread_create(&id[0], NULL, foo, mptr);
    pthread_create(&id[1], NULL, boo, mptr);

    pthread_join(id[0], NULL);
    pthread_join(id[1], NULL);
}

I decided to sum up all the values in the memory region (obviously, the value will overflow) to prevent the CPU from doing microarchitectural optimization.

[The other Idea was to simply dereference the memory region byte by byte and load the value in RAX]

We go over the memory region repetitions times to reduce the noise within one run induced by the slightly different startup time of the threads and other processes and interrupts on the system.

Results

My machine has four physical and eight logical cores. Logical core x and x+4 are located on the same physical one (lstopo).

CPU: Intel Core i5 8250u

Running on the same logical core

Since the kernel uses PCIDs to identify TLB entries, a context switch to the other thread should not invalidate the TLBs.

> $ perf stat -e dtlb_load_misses.stlb_hit,dtlb_load_misses.miss_causes_a_walk,cycles,task-clock ./main 1 1
Running on CPU: 1
Running on CPU: 1

 Performance counter stats for './main 1 1':

        12,621,724      dtlb_load_misses.stlb_hit:u #   49.035 M/sec
             1,152      dtlb_load_misses.miss_causes_a_walk:u #    4.475 K/sec
       834,363,092      cycles:u                  #    3.241 GHz
            257.40 msec task-clock:u              #    0.997 CPUs utilized

       0.258177969 seconds time elapsed

       0.258253000 seconds user
       0.000000000 seconds sys

Running on two different physical cores

No TLB sharing or interference whatsoever.

> $ perf stat -e dtlb_load_misses.stlb_hit,dtlb_load_misses.miss_causes_a_walk,cycles,task-clock ./main 1 2
Running on CPU: 1
Running on CPU: 2

 Performance counter stats for './main 1 2':

        11,740,758      dtlb_load_misses.stlb_hit:u #   45.962 M/sec
             1,647      dtlb_load_misses.miss_causes_a_walk:u #    6.448 K/sec
       834,021,644      cycles:u                  #    3.265 GHz
            255.44 msec task-clock:u              #    1.991 CPUs utilized

       0.128304564 seconds time elapsed

       0.255768000 seconds user
       0.000000000 seconds sys

Running on the same physical core

If TLB sharing is possible, I would expect to have here the lowest sTLB hits and a low number of dTLB page walks. But instead, we have the highest number in both cases.

> $ perf stat -e dtlb_load_misses.stlb_hit,dtlb_load_misses.miss_causes_a_walk,cycles,task-clock ./main 1 5
Running on CPU: 1
Running on CPU: 5

 Performance counter stats for './main 1 5':

       140,040,429      dtlb_load_misses.stlb_hit:u #  291.368 M/sec
           198,827      dtlb_load_misses.miss_causes_a_walk:u #  413.680 K/sec
     1,596,298,827      cycles:u                  #    3.321 GHz
            480.63 msec task-clock:u              #    1.990 CPUs utilized

       0.241509701 seconds time elapsed

       0.480996000 seconds user
       0.000000000 seconds sys

Conclusion

As you can see, we have the most sTLB hits and dTLB page walks when running on the same physical core. Thus, I would follow from it that there is no sharing mechanism for the same PCID on the same physical core. Running the process on the same logical core and two different physical cores results in roughly the same amount of misses/hits to the sTLB. This further supports the thesis that there is sharing on the same logical core but not on the physical one.

Update

As suggested by Peter also use a linked-list approach to prevent THP and prefetching. The modified data is shown below.

Compile with -O0 to prevent optimization

#define _GNU_SOURCE
#include <stdio.h>
#include <pthread.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <inttypes.h>
#include <err.h>
#include <sched.h>
#include <time.h>
#include <sys/mman.h>

#define PAGE_SIZE 4096

const int repetitions = 1ll << 20;
const uint64_t ptrsize = 1ll<< 5;
uint64_t main_cpu, co_cpu ;

void pin_task_to(int pid, int cpu)
{
    cpu_set_t cset;
    CPU_ZERO(&cset);
    CPU_SET(cpu, &cset);
    if (sched_setaffinity(pid, sizeof(cpu_set_t), &cset))
        err(1, "affinity");
}
void pin_to(int cpu) { pin_task_to(0, cpu); }


void *foo(void *p)
{
    pin_to(main_cpu);

    uint64_t *value;
    uint64_t *ptr = (uint64_t *)p;
    printf("Running on CPU: %d\n", sched_getcpu());
    for (size_t j = 0; j < repetitions; j++)
    {
        value = ptr;
        for (size_t i = 0; i < ptrsize; i++)
        {
            value = (uint64_t *)*value;
        }
    }
    volatile uint64_t *dummy = value;
    pthread_exit(NULL);
}

void *boo(void *p)
{
    pin_to(co_cpu);

    uint64_t *value;
    uint64_t *ptr = (uint64_t *)p;
    printf("Running on CPU: %d\n", sched_getcpu());
    for (size_t j = 0; j < repetitions; j++)
    {
        value = ptr;
        for (size_t i = 0; i < ptrsize; i++)
        {
            value = (uint64_t *)*value;
        }
    }
    volatile uint64_t *dummy = value;
    pthread_exit(NULL);
}

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    if (argc < 3){
        exit(-1);
    }
    srand(time(NULL));

    uint64_t *head,*tail,*tmp_ptr;
    int r;
    head = mmap(NULL,PAGE_SIZE,PROT_READ|PROT_WRITE,MAP_PRIVATE | MAP_ANONYMOUS,0,0);
    tail = head;
    for (size_t i = 0; i < ptrsize; i++)
    {
        r = (rand() & 0xF) +1;
        // try to use differents offset to the next page to prevent microarch prefetching
        tmp_ptr = mmap(tail-r*PAGE_SIZE, PAGE_SIZE, PROT_READ | PROT_WRITE, MAP_PRIVATE | MAP_ANONYMOUS, 0, 0);
        *tail = (uint64_t)tmp_ptr;
        tail = tmp_ptr;
    }

    printf("%Lx, %lx\n", head, *head);
    main_cpu = strtoul(argv[1], NULL, 16);
    co_cpu = strtoul(argv[2], NULL, 16);
    pthread_t id[2];

    pthread_create(&id[0], NULL, foo, head);
    pthread_create(&id[1], NULL, boo, head);

    pthread_join(id[0], NULL);
    pthread_join(id[1], NULL);
}

Same Logical Core

> $ perf stat -e dtlb_load_misses.stlb_hit,dtlb_load_misses.miss_causes_a_walk,cycles,task-clock ./main 1 1                                 
7feac4d90000, 7feac4d5b000
Running on CPU: 1
Running on CPU: 1

 Performance counter stats for './main 1 1':

             3,696      dtlb_load_misses.stlb_hit:u #   11.679 K/sec
               743      dtlb_load_misses.miss_causes_a_walk:u #    2.348 K/sec
       762,856,367      cycles:u                  #    2.410 GHz
            316.48 msec task-clock:u              #    0.998 CPUs utilized

       0.317105072 seconds time elapsed

       0.316859000 seconds user
       0.000000000 seconds sys

Different Physical Cores

> $ perf stat -e dtlb_load_misses.stlb_hit,dtlb_load_misses.miss_causes_a_walk,cycles,task-clock ./main 1 2                                 
7f59bb395000, 7f59bb34d000
Running on CPU: 1
Running on CPU: 2

 Performance counter stats for './main 1 2':

            15,144      dtlb_load_misses.stlb_hit:u #   49.480 K/sec
               756      dtlb_load_misses.miss_causes_a_walk:u #    2.470 K/sec
       770,800,780      cycles:u                  #    2.518 GHz
            306.06 msec task-clock:u              #    1.982 CPUs utilized

       0.154410840 seconds time elapsed

       0.306345000 seconds user
       0.000000000 seconds sys

Same Physical Core / Different Logical Cores

> $ perf stat -e dtlb_load_misses.stlb_hit,dtlb_load_misses.miss_causes_a_walk,cycles,task-clock ./main 1 5                                 
7f7d69e8b000, 7f7d69e56000
Running on CPU: 5
Running on CPU: 1

 Performance counter stats for './main 1 5':

         9,237,992      dtlb_load_misses.stlb_hit:u #   20.554 M/sec
               789      dtlb_load_misses.miss_causes_a_walk:u #    1.755 K/sec
     1,007,185,858      cycles:u                  #    2.241 GHz
            449.45 msec task-clock:u              #    1.989 CPUs utilized

       0.225947522 seconds time elapsed

       0.449813000 seconds user
       0.000000000 seconds sys
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  • 1
    Did you compile with optimization disabled (the gcc default)? I assume so or it would have removed your loops that only update a local value that isn't used later, with the array reads not being volatile. Without optimization, it won't inline or do constant-propagation across statements. Oh, and you didn't use const or static const on your global variables, so main can't assume their initial values, even if you did enable optimization. May 20, 2022 at 16:18
  • 1
    That makes sense. Thank you very much so far. I still find it a little strange that there are (apparently) no sharing mechanisms implemented. Even if Intel holds a patent in that area (patents.google.com/patent/US9703566) May 24, 2022 at 11:51
  • 1
    True. But after taking a closer look at the kernel code again, PCIDs are only used on a per-CPU basis. And as far as I can tell these are logical ones. However, the kernel only makes use of 6-different PCID values (with KPTI 12 different, the upper PCID bit is used to switch between kernel and userspace mappings). So I would assume there are collisions if we execute it multiple times. May 25, 2022 at 7:48
  • 1
    It should have been enabled when I conducted the experiments (it's the default for desktop systems isn't it?). According to Intel flushes of the TLB (induced by a CR3 write with the MSB set or a context switch) do not affect global entries. May 12, 2023 at 11:47
  • 1
    @MohammadSiavashi: PCIDs are only a few bits wide and their meaning is private to each logical core. (I think I didn't know this a year ago when I was commenting.) So the architectural guarantees they define make it impossible to share them between logical cores, I'm pretty sure. If one logical core still had some hot TLB entries tagged with one PCID when the other core the same PCID and even the same CR3 physical address of the top-level page directory (but with different entries), it's required that the new core doesn't use the stale entries. So they can't share. May 12, 2023 at 16:31

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