2

I have a dynamic data structure which looks like this:

struct tree_node {
    int y;
    int x;
    struct tree_node *left;
    struct tree_node *right;
    struct tree_node *parent;
};

The structure is a node of a binary tree, with the addition that each node also points to its parent. Now, using the classical method of adding nodes to the binary tree using malloc() I can populate the binary tree easily. However, I am having trouble deallocating the binary tree from memory.

Usually, to remove nodes from the binary tree you perform a post-order traversal and then free each node like this:

void deleteTree(struct tree_node* node)
{
    if (node == NULL) return;

    deleteTree(node->left);
    deleteTree(node->right);

    printf("Deleting node with values [%d][%d]\n", node->y , node-> x);

    free(node -> left);
    free(node -> right);
    free(node -> parent);
    free(node);
    printf("\nNode deleted");
}

However, when I run the above function it does not deallocate the binary tree from memory. When I run the function, it deallocates one leaf and then when it tries to delete the next node it gets stuck in an endless loop and my computer either crashes or the program exits with a non-descriptive error.

The output in the terminal is the following:

Deleting node with values [11][4]
Node deleted
Deleting node with values [7739840][0]

So the terminal shows that it deletes the first leaf, and then it tries to fetch the values from the next node but it cannot (which is why it displays 7739840). Then it gets stuck in an endless loop since it does not print "Node deleted".

How can I correctly deallocate the memory? Does it have to do with the way my node is built?

9
  • 1
    Just from my gut, I'd say you are trying to access a member of a freed structure. May 23, 2022 at 13:53
  • 1
    Fyi, the output on my compiler tells me there is no next_1 or next_2 members of struct tree_node, when deleteTree(node->next_1); and deleteTree(node->next_2); are encountered. And judging by your stated structure definition, that's correct. So either the posted structure isn't real, or the posted code isn't (or both?). One thing with near-certainty, however: free(node -> parent); is wrong. the parent will be deleted in a parental recursion. In fact, so will left and right if you pass those to deleteTree rather than the fictitious next_ and next_2.
    – WhozCraig
    May 23, 2022 at 13:53
  • 1
    struct treenode does not have next_1 and next_2 fields.
    – Zakk
    May 23, 2022 at 13:53
  • 3
    The primary issue I see right now is, that you are calling free(node->left) etc, meaning you deallocate the left/right/parent nodes from memory. Once you go back to the parent object, its memory has already been deallocated, meaning that you are now accessing uninitialized memory. May 23, 2022 at 13:55
  • 3
    Pay close attention to Refugnic's comment: The only free call in that function should be free(node);. the entire function should be four lines long. 1. leave if node is null. Otherwise 2. deleteTree(node->left);, then 3. deleteTree(node->right), and finally 4. free(node); That's it.
    – WhozCraig
    May 23, 2022 at 14:01

3 Answers 3

5

The correct way of deallocating all the nodes from your tree structure looks like this:

void deleteTree(struct tree_node* node)
{
    if (node == NULL) return;

    deleteTree(node->left);
    deleteTree(node->right);

    free(node);
}
5

You're deallocating nodes multiple times.

When you delete a given node, after deleteTree(node->left) is called the left node has already been freed, so it doesn't need to be freed again. So remove free(node->left).

The current node has also been freed because free(node->parent) was called in that function, so any further reads of node access freed memory. So remove free(node->parent).

And similarly to the call to deleteTree(node->left), calling deleteTree(node->right) already frees the right node, so remove the call to free(node->right).

So now you're left with:

void deleteTree(struct tree_node* node)
{
    if (node == NULL) return;

    deleteTree(node->left);
    deleteTree(node->right);

    printf("Deleting node with values [%d][%d]\n", node->y , node-> x);

    free(node);
    printf("\nNode deleted");
}

In short, each node is responsible for cleaning itself up.

0

This is happening because you are freeing the same node multiple times.

To delete a binary search tree you have to do something like this.

void bst_destroy(BSTNode node) {
    if (node == NULL) {
        return;
    }

    bst_destroy(node->left);
    bst_destroy(node->right);

    free(node);
}

Basically to delete a binary search tree you have to delete the leaves of the tree one by one so you don't end up deleting parent nodes you might have to visit again (which you will have to do if you are using recursion).

1

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