13

I'm developing for a single-core embedded chip. In C & C++ it's common to statically-define mutable values that can be used globally. The Rust equivalent is roughly this:

static mut MY_VALUE: usize = 0;

pub fn set_value(val: usize) {
    unsafe { MY_VALUE = val }
}

pub fn get_value() -> usize {
    unsafe { MY_VALUE }
}

Now anywhere can call the free functions get_value and set_value.

I think that this should be entirely safe in single-threaded embedded Rust, but I've not been able to find a definitive answer. I'm only interested in types that don't require allocation or destruction (like the primitive in the example here).

The only gotcha I can see is with the compiler or processor reordering accesses in unexpected ways (which could be solves using the volatile access methods), but is that unsafe per se?


Edit:

The book suggests that this is safe so long as we can guarantee no multi-threaded data races (obviously the case here)

With mutable data that is globally accessible, it’s difficult to ensure there are no data races, which is why Rust considers mutable static variables to be unsafe.

The docs are phrased less definitively, suggesting that data races are only one way this can be unsafe but not expanding on other examples

accessing mutable statics can cause undefined behavior in a number of ways, for example due to data races in a multithreaded context

The nomicon suggests that this should be safe so long as you don't somehow dereference a bad pointer.

10
  • The term "unsafe" is incorrect here. Yes, it is unsafe, because Rust requires unsafe to access it. You probably meant unsound. Commented May 24, 2022 at 21:03
  • 1
    @ChayimFriedman I thought it was common to use "unsafe" in a context meaning "this piece of unsafe-wrapped code is not a valid safe abstraction". I'm confident I've seen it used in that context before many times. To me "unsound" could include broader correctness concerns. But please do point me to a ref if I've got these mixed up.
    – JMAA
    Commented May 24, 2022 at 21:07
  • 1
    Soundness is a logical property. A block of Rust code is unsafe if the compiler can not prove that it is sound.
    – Ian S.
    Commented May 24, 2022 at 21:20
  • 1
    Here is the official description of unsafe vs unsound in the Rust documentation: doc.rust-lang.org/beta/reference/… `
    – Finomnis
    Commented May 24, 2022 at 21:24
  • 3
    I think the most crucial error in your train of thought is that single-threaded microcontrollers do not care about concurrency problems. Interrupts are also a form of concurrency which cause the exact same problems as multithreading, and they exist on almost every microcontroller.
    – Finomnis
    Commented May 24, 2022 at 21:35

4 Answers 4

13

Be aware as there is no such thing as single-threaded code as long as interrupts are enabled. So even for microcontrollers, mutable statics are unsafe.

If you really can guarantee single-threaded access, your assumption is correct that accessing primitive types should be safe. That's why the Cell type exists, which allows mutability of primitive types with the exception that it is not Sync (meaning it explicitely prevents threaded access).

That said, to create a safe static variable, it needs to implement Sync for exactly the reason mentioned above; which Cell doesn't do, for obvious reasons.

To actually have a mutable global variable with a primitive type without using an unsafe block, I personally would use an Atomic. Atomics do not allocate and are available in the core library, meaning they work on microcontrollers.

use core::sync::atomic::{AtomicUsize, Ordering};

static MY_VALUE: AtomicUsize = AtomicUsize::new(0);

pub fn set_value(val: usize) {
    MY_VALUE.store(val, Ordering::Relaxed)
}

pub fn get_value() -> usize {
    MY_VALUE.load(Ordering::Relaxed)
}

fn main() {
    println!("{}", get_value());
    set_value(42);
    println!("{}", get_value());
}

Atomics with Relaxed are zero-overhead on almost all architectures.

13
  • My understanding was that atomics with Ordering::Relaxed basically compile to ordinary mov on most architectures, so is this actually any different or does it simply avoid needing unsafe blocks?
    – JMAA
    Commented May 24, 2022 at 21:48
  • Having tested this for my specific case at hand (armv4) unfortunately Ordering::Relaxed is my own option. I get linker errors with acqurie/release (presumably because of lack of relevant intrinsics, but that's getting off-topic for this question).
    – JMAA
    Commented May 24, 2022 at 22:24
  • 1
    Be aware that Atomics might not work if no respective mov command exists on the architecture, for example AtomicU128 is not lock-free on a 32-bit system and might therefore fail to compile.
    – Finomnis
    Commented May 24, 2022 at 22:34
  • 2
    There is another fact about Cell that makes it sound besides the fact it is !Sync: it does not allow the user to get any references to the inside from a shared reference to the cell itself. To allow such access would make it unsound, even apart from thread safety.
    – trent
    Commented May 25, 2022 at 10:06
  • (That is the case both in your and the OP's examples, but it is not made explicit anywhere)
    – trent
    Commented May 25, 2022 at 10:08
4

In this case it's not unsound, but you still should avoid it because it is too easy to misuse it in a way that is UB.

Instead, use a wrapper around UnsafeCell that is Sync:

pub struct SyncCell<T>(UnsafeCell<T>);

unsafe impl<T> Sync for SyncCell<T> {}

impl<T> SyncCell<T> {
    pub const fn new(v: T) -> Self { Self(UnsafeCell::new(v)); }

    pub unsafe fn set(&self, v: T) { *self.0.get() = v; }
}

impl<T: Copy> SyncCell<T> {
    pub unsafe fn get(&self) -> T { *self.0.get() }
}

If you use nightly, you can use SyncUnsafeCell.

5
  • Is there any advantage to using UnsafeCell over Cell here?
    – hkBst
    Commented May 25, 2022 at 13:59
  • 1
    @hkBst No, not really. UnsafeCell is the basic interior mutability primitive all other primitives are based on. But you can wrap Cell and unsafe impl Sync for it. Commented May 25, 2022 at 20:39
  • Would you mind elaborating how this is sound? To me, your code very much sounds like it contains a race condition... There is nothing preventing two threads to simultaneously call "set" or "set" and "get", so i don't think this struct should be "sync"
    – Finomnis
    Commented Aug 27, 2022 at 8:13
  • @Finomnis The OP is talking about a scenraio where everything is single threaded. Commented Aug 27, 2022 at 23:59
  • I guess he then has to manually make sure not to call this from within an interrupt handier?
    – Finomnis
    Commented Aug 28, 2022 at 6:55
2

Mutable statics are unsafe in general because they circumvent the normal borrow checker rules that enforce either exactly 1 mutable borrow exists or any number of immutable borrows exist (including 0), which allows you to write code which causes undefined behavior. For instance, the following compiles and prints 2 2:

static mut COUNTER: i32 = 0;

fn main() {
    unsafe {
        let mut_ref1 = &mut COUNTER;
        let mut_ref2 = &mut COUNTER;
        *mut_ref1 += 1;
        *mut_ref2 += 1;
        println!("{mut_ref1} {mut_ref2}");
    }
}

However we have two mutable references to the same location in memory existing concurrently, which is UB.

I believe the code that you posted there is safe, but I generally would not recommend using static mut. Use an atomic, SyncUnsafeCell/UnsafeCell, a wrapper around a Cell that implements Sync which is safe since your environment is single-threaded, or honestly just about anything else. static mut is wildly unsafe and its use is highly discouraged.

5
  • Thanks. This answers the question of the title, but not the code in the body of my question (which doesn't allow such aliasing by construction).
    – JMAA
    Commented May 24, 2022 at 20:49
  • 1
    Edited to reply to your code example specifically
    – Ian S.
    Commented May 24, 2022 at 20:53
  • "static mut is wildly unsafe..." perhaps my question might have been better posed as a "so long as I use primitives and avoid aliasing and threading, is it unsafe?". Maybe I'll write a new clearer question later.
    – JMAA
    Commented May 24, 2022 at 20:57
  • Of course I would normally use atomics/mutexes/etc., but not every platform supports those and not every usecase can bear the overhead. I will look more into UsafeCell et al
    – JMAA
    Commented May 24, 2022 at 21:04
  • 1
    I mean yes if you do everything correctly (ensure the borrow rules are upheld, which broadly covers everything you've mentioned) then it's sound, tautologically. The point is that it's extremely easy to mess that up, and other abstractions (such as UnsafeCell and SyncUnsafeCell which Chayim mentioned) are available to make the unsafety more explicit, and have documentation outlining the contract you're opting-into more explicitly. My personal recommendation would be to base your solution off of Chayim's answer or do something similar by just wrapping Cell since your type is Copy.
    – Ian S.
    Commented May 24, 2022 at 21:08
0

In order to sidestep the issue of exactly how mutable statics can be used safely in single-threaded code, another option is to use thread-local storage:

use std::cell::Cell;

thread_local! (static MY_VALUE: Cell<usize> = {
    Cell::new(0)
});

pub fn set_value(val: usize) {
    MY_VALUE.with(|cell| cell.set(val))
}

pub fn get_value() -> usize {
    MY_VALUE.with(|cell| cell.get())
}
2
  • (a) Cell is much better than RefCell for that. (b) The OP said they are developing for emebedded, so they likely have neither std nor thread locals. Commented May 25, 2022 at 11:49
  • @ChayimFriedman, two good points, thanks! I fixed (a) and accept (b) as a limitation. I still think this is useful for non-embedded.
    – hkBst
    Commented May 25, 2022 at 13:57

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.